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Big Orange

I've Been To London.

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I've been to London and I must say that the architecture (whether it's Georgian, Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco, post-WWII concrete garbage or Foster futurism) is an odd mishmash of huge impressive ugliness, especially around Tooley Street with the triple whammy of Tower Bridge, the splurging of original Georgian and Victorian buildings into 1960s/1970s and 1990s/2000s buildings, and the Shard (it's out of place, not very easy on the eye, not fitting into any coherent urban planning, but seems to be pretty much London construction in the past couple of centuries).

The London Underground was overcrowded, with thousands of commuters flowing down passageways in waves, but luckily the Underground was functioning relatively well on the day of my visit. I really like Paddington Station (it flows better than that other 19th century station that's a monstrosity in comparison, St. Pancras Station).

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Yes. American cities seem to have strict zoning (and possibly european cities too, ie all the skyscrapers in Paris at la defense) policies re: height.

I suppose some think that the shard is in the middle of nowhere high rise wise makes london look 'unique'

Looks a mess to me.

I think you got lucky with the transport. I avoid the place, but whenever dad goes down to watch the football (about once a month) something is wrong with the underground, delaying him for 3-6 hours most times. Third world transport. and thats north of the river. South of the river, no underground, no proper high capacity roads. Shocking really.

OTOH ive never been to Paris. Apparently they have constant riots there, so i guess everything is relative.

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I think you got lucky with the transport. I avoid the place, but whenever dad goes down to watch the football (about once a month) something is wrong with the underground, delaying him for 3-6 hours most times. Third world transport.

I don't think one of the deepest and most extensive underground high capacity train networks in the world is strictly Third World, but more prone to things going badly wrong and needs constant maintenance. The stations, the Central Line and commuter tunnels in general seemed smarter than they did a decade ago.

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I LOVE LONDON

agree, it's just the people that live there that are shi&tes :)

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Third world transport. and thats north of the river. South of the river, no underground, no proper high capacity roads. Shocking really.

You don't spend much time in the third world, do you? As a frequent traveller to SE Asia, I'd be delighted at a London level of transportation. The only subway I know of in the developing world with comparable coverage is Beijing. The two last times I was in Manila (one rickety monorail line unconnected to the airport) and Jakarta (they are discussing building a monorail) it took 3 hours and 2 hours respectively to get to my hotel.

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I've been to London and I must say that the architecture (whether it's Georgian, Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco, post-WWII concrete garbage or Foster futurism) is an odd mishmash of huge impressive ugliness, especially around Tooley Street with the triple whammy of Tower Bridge, the splurging of original Georgian and Victorian buildings into 1960s/1970s and 1990s/2000s buildings, and the Shard (it's out of place, not very easy on the eye, not fitting into any coherent urban planning, but seems to be pretty much London construction in the past couple of centuries).

You need to keep in mind that most of the big planning decisions for more recent buildings were taken by the Luftwaffe. Once planning permission for redevelopment was granted, they would helpfully mark the spot with a big crater.

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Almost unrecognisable from the city I knew in my youth.

This is not just down to thing such as immigration.

The actual appearance of many of the buildings from earlier centuries has changed due to cleaning and the decline in the use of coal.

Although the Clean Air act was initially introduced in 1956 you could still see why London was known as 'the smoke' right into the 1970s

An Exchange student from southern France who stayed with me at that time was amazed by the amount of soot on buildings

You sometimes catch a glimpse of that world in British films from the 1960s such as Robbery or the IPCRESS file.

By the way watch the car chase in Peter Yates Robbery. It predates those in Bullitt (which Yates also directed) and the French Connection

Great scene also filmed at Leyton Orient football ground which will give you some idea how open to the elements football crowds were in that era

A grubby, sometimes violent, but more intimate and freer world than today

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Almost unrecognisable from the city I knew in my youth.

Same here, nice clip.....how things have changed, notice the lack of yellow lines and driving/parking restrictions....somehow I think people have far fewer freedoms today in all sorts of ways than they had then. :(

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Pah! Southern nancies. This was Milnsbridge Huddersfield in its hey day *cough* * cough*

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Primrose Hill looking towards the town..

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Same here, nice clip.....how things have changed, notice the lack of yellow lines and driving/parking restrictions....somehow I think people have far fewer freedoms today in all sorts of ways than they had then. :(

I can't say for any time prior to 1970, but for me, London is the best it's ever been since the 70s, easily.

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It is interesting to hear people's first impressions of a place you may have become so familiar with that you fail to see it any more.

Many years ago I was struck by a Dutch friend's observation when visiting central London on the tourist trail, was how big the doors were on the old buildings. He wondered whether giants had lived there once upon a time.

Of course, a part of our former Imperial grandness of old. One that is not replicated in the likes of Amsterdam and other Dutch cities.

I always notice 'the big doors' now.

Diana Doors?

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I can't say for any time prior to 1970, but for me, London is the best it's ever been since the 70s, easily.

There are certain areas, even Paddington and Islington not so long back, but more recently Brixton, Shoreditch even Hackney (Dalston) that have turned things around and become trendy areas to live and work.

In a sense much of central London is a playground, not just for tourists but for those lucky people who work in media, politics or banking.

I live in London, and can appreciate its good points - on the whole I can avoid the bad parts except for the noise and high prices - but if I was offered a job or business opportunity that involved going elsewhere I'd move like a shot.

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London born and bred... Moved away 7 years ago never looked back.......

It is now not the city I was born or brought up in......

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London born and bred... Moved away 7 years ago never looked back.......

It is now not the city I was born or brought up in......

Same, served its purpose, means to an end, good while it lasted......many followed you? ;)

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London born and bred... Moved away 7 years ago never looked back.......

It is now not the city I was born or brought up in......

I'm seriously thinking of moving to Sweden in a few years time. High quality houses in Gothenburg a third of the price of London. Far less stressful working life. I have close family here. Only problem are the long winters...

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I love London, especially on days like this, walking down the River, along the South Bank. Being inspired by the buildings and the history.

Some London friends are off to the Refinery Bar Southwark to watch the mens finals on a big screen. B*studs :lol::angry:

The sad thing is we have no other City in the UK that in any way matches London. It is a world class City, we might as well be proud of that at least.

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I'm seriously thinking of moving to Sweden in a few years time. High quality houses in Gothenburg a third of the price of London. Far less stressful working life. I have close family here. Only problem are the long winters...

Long winters yes. But there are loads of wintertime stuff you can do and enjoy. Oh how I would love to move back.

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Have to say on a day like this Edinburgh pishes all over London.

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I love London, especially on days like this, walking down the River, along the South Bank. Being inspired by the buildings and the history.

Some London friends are off to the Refinery Bar Southwark to watch the mens finals on a big screen. B*studs :lol::angry:

The sad thing is we have no other City in the UK that in any way matches London. It is a world class City, we might as well be proud of that at least.

Looking at the green hill, paragliders rising on the warm thermals against a clear blue bright sky.....

London is good for certain things, but so are so many other places in the UK. ;)

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I don't think one of the deepest and most extensive underground high capacity train networks in the world is strictly Third World, but more prone to things going badly wrong and needs constant maintenance. The stations, the Central Line and commuter tunnels in general seemed smarter than they did a decade ago.

Yep, most of it built a century or so ago, when Britain had the same mortality rates and so forth as the third world does today. Im sure India has one of the most extensive train networks too. Still third world.

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I love London, especially on days like this, walking down the River, along the South Bank. Being inspired by the buildings and the history.

Some London friends are off to the Refinery Bar Southwark to watch the mens finals on a big screen. B*studs :lol::angry:

The sad thing is we have no other City in the UK that in any way matches London. It is a world class City, we might as well be proud of that at least.

Last time I was in London 'on a day like this' after nearly collapsing of heat exhaustion on the underground London didnt even redeem itself by having lots of scantily clad women enjoying the summer weather. Nope, just lots of women covered head to toe in Islamo-ninja garb. Best thing about summer, gone :angry:

On the otherhand, trying to get away from London on a day like this is even worse. Fancy going to the coast and you can sit on the M23 for 6 hours instead.

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Last time I was in London 'on a day like this' after nearly collapsing of heat exhaustion on the underground London didnt even redeem itself by having lots of scantily clad women enjoying the summer weather. Nope, just lots of women covered head to toe in Islamo-ninja garb. Best thing about summer, gone :angry:

On the otherhand, trying to get away from London on a day like this is even worse. Fancy going to the coast and you can sit on the M23 for 6 hours instead.

The key to London "on a day like this" is to stick to the river which works like a giant air conditioning plant and avoid the public transport like a plague. The only case of heat exhaustion/dehydration I've come close to is being stuck on a double decker bus in traffic, unlike the old routemasters which have some permanent ventilation.

There is something to be said for being amongst "the crowd." Peter Ackroyd comments on this on his history of London. "The crowd" was almost a uniquely London experience with people thronging the markets and the streets. People hadn't really experienced "the crowd" outside of London.

Clearly not the place to be if you want to get away from it all!

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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