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SarahBell

Foi Bedroom Tax

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https://www.whatdotheyknow.com/request/bedroom_tax_14#incoming-389320

1. How many homes in Oldham are subject to 'bedroom tax'?

The Council has identified 2417 households in social housing who're currently under-occupying their home and will be subject to the bedroom tax. These have been broken down into electoral wards as requested.

Ward Number

Chadderton North 49

Chadderton Central 32

Chadderton South 103

St. James' 208

St. Mary's 225

Waterhead 155

Failsworth East 40

Failsworth West 93

Hollinwood 311

Royton North 67

Royton South 74

Shaw 69

Crompton 48

Saddleworth North 18

Saddleworth South 11

Saddleworth West & Lees 15

Alexandra 309

Coldhurst 246

Medlock Vale 210

Werneth 134

2. Number of one bedroom properties currently available for people to move into?

We have interpreted this question as number of one bedroom properties available for re-letting in the social rented sector. At the time of writing four one bedroom properties were in the process of being allocated. However, it's important to note that five-hundred one bedroom properties in the social housing stock became available for re-letting between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013. We're therefore anticipating that a similar number of one bedroom properties will be available in the current financial year.

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Of course there may be people who could move to a 2 or 3 bedroom place to avoid bedroom tax

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Stockport

There are approximately 1500 Council and Stockport Homes tenants affected

by the under-occupation changes to housing benefit that came into effect

in April 2013. The Council does not hold the figures for housing

associations or a breakdown at constituency or ward level.

Council properties are allocated through a 'choice based lettings scheme'

so it is not possible to provide a waiting time for someone to move into a

one bedroom flat, as this depends upon their areas of choice and other

factors that may affect their priority for rehousing. There are 8 one

bedroom flats available this week for people to apply for, and on average

around 450 Council properties of this size become available each year.

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Bolton:

Could you please tell me how many homes in Bolton are subject to

'bedroom tax'

At “go live” 3,469 properties.

The number of 1 bed properties advertised during April was 54.

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St Helens..

https://www.whatdoth...UMULTY.pdf.html

So who's this Gary and has he compiled the results anywhere?

Gary Tumulty is NW organiser for the British National Party Sarah.

Could post a link to the BNP website but I'm not going to.

So its just you and a the British fascist right wing campaigning this. Interesting. B)

Never mind, Gary probably thinks foreigners are hoarding all the bedrooms, in some ghastly plot to destabilise the banking system.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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2. Number of one bedroom properties currently available for people to move into?

We have interpreted this question as number of one bedroom properties available for re-letting in the social rented sector. At the time of writing four one bedroom properties were in the process of being allocated. However, it's important to note that five-hundred one bedroom properties in the social housing stock became available for re-letting between 1st April 2012 and 31st March 2013. We're therefore anticipating that a similar number of one bedroom properties will be available in the current financial year.

Presumably the people moving into the underoccupied properties will be moving from smaller properties so the supply of smaller properties would be higher than that figure suggests.

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I actually think there are people in overcrowded accommodation who'd probably really like the right number of rooms. But social housing has been for keeps up until now - and as many bedrooms as they gave you until you died a cold lonely death in a house that was too big for you to look after or heat.

Of course if there is no one overcrowded anymore in the UK then it shows what a great job has been done by councils over the last decade.

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I actually think there are people in overcrowded accommodation who'd probably really like the right number of rooms. But social housing has been for keeps up until now - and as many bedrooms as they gave you until you died a cold lonely death in a house that was too big for you to look after or heat.

Of course if there is no one overcrowded anymore in the UK then it shows what a great job has been done by councils over the last decade.

Or they could just build more social housing. I'm sure we all agree that not enough housing is being built of any type.

However in my town they are knocking down a 60's tower block of bedsits. for a new Tesco.

The only new building on any scale is student housing.

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Or they could just build more social housing. I'm sure we all agree that not enough housing is being built of any type.

However in my town they are knocking down a 60's tower block of bedsits. for a new Tesco.

The only new building on any scale is student housing.

They could.

But how many bedrooms should they be building per property?

it looks like there should be a huge number of one bedroom flats - or even shared student style accomodation to solve some of the problems at the moment.

As energy bills increase year on year it gets harder for people on benefits, the elderly and sick, to heat these massive homes.

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They could.

But how many bedrooms should they be building per property?

it looks like there should be a huge number of one bedroom flats - or even shared student style accomodation to solve some of the problems at the moment.

As energy bills increase year on year it gets harder for people on benefits, the elderly and sick, to heat these massive homes.

Well my policy would have been to build plenty of new "affordable" modern one bed accommodation to be let on a secure tenancy to start with before implementing the bedroom tax. And a proportion of these would have to ground floor, disability adapted.

This would have substantially cut down on the objections.

The scale of student flat building in my town is something to behold. When there is a will, there is a way.

You seem to be ignoring that many of the people who are paying the bedroom tax, have had their homes adapted for wheelchairs over time, thus why there is resistance to move.

The government could have protected the population from HPI with a massive house building programme. They didn't and therefore they have failed to protect the interests of the population.

If all people want is a spare bedroom, then that is not all difficult or expensive to provide. Its not as if they are demanding swimming pools, en-suites or double garages to park the Ferrari.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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You seem to be ignoring that many of the people who are paying the bedroom tax, have had their homes adapted for wheelchairs over time, thus why there is resistance to move.

If all people want is a spare bedroom, then that is not all difficult or expensive to provide. Its not as if they are demanding swimming pools, en-suites or double garages to park the Ferrari.

There are top ups for people who've got adapted properties. Whether it means everyone who needs a walking stick will get a spare room.

So if they're not expensive why can lots of working people not afford them?

LHA has been 'bedroom tax' for people in the private rented sector.

Why should people social housing be afforded such higher levels of space than those who have the misfortune to rent privately?

It would have been nice if during the boom years councils had looked ahead at the way households were changing and made provision separately.

The investments held in Icelandic banks could have boosted local genuinely affordable housing for people.

If BTL is seen as a pension, then why don't council's do the same with their spare cash?

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So if they're not expensive why can lots of working people not afford them?

The reason why a lot of working people can't afford a spare room is because massive credit expansion has bid up the price of artificially restricted land and building. Land and Building in the UK is a cartel.

It has nothing to do whatsover with social tenants hoarding spare bedrooms

When a lot of social housing was built, the government acquired a lot of agricultural land very cheaply and this wasn't a problem.

None of this was a problem in the 60, 70's, 80's and 90's until house prices got totally out of control under the last 'LabourTory` government

Furthermore more people have become dependent on benefits due to the outsourcing and insourcing of employment and immigration which have put a ceiling on earnings.

Furthermore a lot of one bed social housing which might have been available has been demolished due to lack of demand, social problems and shoddy construction methods employed by private contractors which make continued upkeep prohibitive.

You will of course be objecting to those buying under Help To Buy getting more bedrooms than they really need, in addition to those claiming for SMI payments.

Hopefully you will be insisting that Ian Duncan Smith will be taking a cut from the €1.5M in subsidies he has received for owning more bedrooms (and fields) than he actually needs.

It might also sound an alien concept in a country used to herding tenants around in a permanent state of insecurity like concentration camp victims, but secure tenancies allow people to put down roots and form their own social networks with neighbours and so on, and therefore don't really want to be forced into moving away.

Finally socially tenants didn't cause the financial crisis and didn't help bid up the cost of housing.

When social housing is finally destroyed (I don't think it will survive another full Tory term) there will be no restraint at all in the UK to rampant rentierism.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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