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Family Devastated After House Sale Falls Through At Last Minute And £20,000 Is Wiped Off Value... Because Japanese Knotweed Is Growing On Council Land

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2354563/Family-devastated-house-sale-falls-minute-20-000-wiped-value--Japanese-knotweed-growing-council-land-garden.html

Family devastated after house sale falls through at last minute and £20,000 is wiped off value... because Japanese knotweed is growing on council land behind their garden

Ben Metcalfe, 35, had his mid-terrace home on market for two years

Surveyor said property in Stockport, Greater Manchester, is worth £80,000, not £100,000 because of aggressive weed

Plant can grow to 12ft tall, push through concrete and damage buildings

Costs £100 per square foot to eradicate with pesticides

Another part of the Columbian Exchange.

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So they didn't actually have 20k knocked off the value, they just over- valued it on first place

Ah well

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So they didn't actually have 20k knocked off the value, they just over- valued it on first place

Ah well

It was not overvalued. It should be worth the full price had the council not negligently allowed knotweed to grow.

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The last house I bought was infested with Japanese Knotweed, it took an afternoon to pull it out and then a 10 minute follow-up session once a week to kill the new shoots, within two months it was completely eradicated and it never came back again.

Problem is that too many householders are too "precious" to get their hands dirty, they are fair prey for specialist companies.

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The last house I bought was infested with Japanese Knotweed, it took an afternoon to pull it out and then a 10 minute follow-up session once a week to kill the new shoots, within two months it was completely eradicated and it never came back again.

Problem is that too many householders are too "precious" to get their hands dirty, they are fair prey for specialist companies.

I thought the roots can go down up to 2 metres though if left to grow for a long time?

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The last house I bought was infested with Japanese Knotweed, it took an afternoon to pull it out and then a 10 minute follow-up session once a week to kill the new shoots, within two months it was completely eradicated and it never came back again.

Problem is that too many householders are too "precious" to get their hands dirty, they are fair prey for specialist companies.

Hardwork, effort, personal responsibility!!! What kind of thinking is that. You should be ashamed of yourself, clearly meetings need to be called and a plan of action discussed, with numerous reports and you come out with idiotic statements likes this!

You should hang your head in shame!

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So they didn't actually have 20k knocked off the value, they just over- valued it on first place

Ah well

That house shown in the article is 29 Gradwell Street, there's also a 'For Sale' board on it in Google Maps.

33 Gradwell Street sold for £78,750 in 2010, but that wouldn't make a headline story in the Daily Hate.

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IMGP1483.JPG

It would take an afternoon with an industrial brush cutter to get rid of that, and a few follow-up sessions on the new growth with glyphosate to stop it coming back.

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It would take an afternoon with an industrial brush cutter to get rid of that, and a few follow-up sessions on the new growth with glyphosate to stop it coming back.

How would you get rid of the massive amount of vegetation though? does it have to be burned off to avoid contamination.

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The last house I bought was infested with Japanese Knotweed, it took an afternoon to pull it out and then a 10 minute follow-up session once a week to kill the new shoots, within two months it was completely eradicated and it never came back again.

Problem is that too many householders are too "precious" to get their hands dirty, they are fair prey for specialist companies.

If you really did comprehensively get rid of it, it sounds like you lucked out

http://www.channel4.com/4homes/build-renovate/structural-problems/japanese-knotweed-identifying-and-removing

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The last house I bought was infested with Japanese Knotweed, it took an afternoon to pull it out and then a 10 minute follow-up session once a week to kill the new shoots, within two months it was completely eradicated and it never came back again.

Problem is that too many householders are too "precious" to get their hands dirty, they are fair prey for specialist companies.

I read some where:

- cut it off at the ground level

- drill vertically into the remaining trunk (do not penetrate sides)

- top up a few times with concentrated glyphosate

- repeat if anything new growths up

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Drill into the trunk? I don't know about the Japanese Knotweed you've seen, but the usual variety is a hollow stemmed thing, a bit like a weak bamboo.

As for its supposed supernatural resistance, in my experience it's just the usual hysterical uninformed BS that forms the basis for most urban myths, and suits the pockets of the 'professional' eradicators. Do you remember rising damp and the injection treatments? Same thing, all BS, no such thing as rising damp.

Of course the latest urban myth is the incredibly dangerous Chinese Lantern. These things are so lethal they can set fire instantly to huge piles of soggy cardboard and yoghurt pots. And that's only about the tenth 'recycling centre' to go up this year - no doubt all unfortunate Chinese Lantern strikes, don't you think? Anyway, thank God the Germans didn't think of these during the war. All that money and effort wasted on V1s and V2s, etc.

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Of course the latest urban myth is the incredibly dangerous Chinese Lantern. These things are so lethal they can set fire instantly to huge piles of soggy cardboard and yoghurt pots. And that's only about the tenth 'recycling centre' to go up this year - no doubt all unfortunate Chinese Lantern strikes, don't you think? Anyway, thank God the Germans didn't think of these during the war. All that money and effort wasted on V1s and V2s, etc.

I'm very sceptical of how bad these things are. That said this film of the Birmingham depot seconds before it caught alight is kind of convincing.

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I'm very sceptical of how bad these things are. That said this film of the Birmingham depot seconds before it caught alight is kind of convincing.

I have to say that if one small stray flame can cause that much damage, then the material was improperly stored and fire prevention measures were inadequate.

That said, and pretty as they can be, sending blobs of flame into the sky with no real control as to where they will land does seem a bit foolhardy... (and some models cause problems for cattle).

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Drill into the trunk? I don't know about the Japanese Knotweed you've seen, but the usual variety is a hollow stemmed thing, a bit like a weak bamboo.

As for its supposed supernatural resistance, in my experience it's just the usual hysterical uninformed BS that forms the basis for most urban myths, and suits the pockets of the 'professional' eradicators. Do you remember rising damp and the injection treatments? Same thing, all BS, no such thing as rising damp.

Of course the latest urban myth is the incredibly dangerous Chinese Lantern. These things are so lethal they can set fire instantly to huge piles of soggy cardboard and yoghurt pots. And that's only about the tenth 'recycling centre' to go up this year - no doubt all unfortunate Chinese Lantern strikes, don't you think? Anyway, thank God the Germans didn't think of these during the war. All that money and effort wasted on V1s and V2s, etc.

I don't know about incredibly dangerous. But to randomly launch large numbers of flames into the air seems to me to be a bit stupid.

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Do you think so? Unless it was very windy, the sideways velocity and way it bounced looked very unconvincing to me. There are a lot of questions in my mind, but I need to be careful what I say. Suffice to say that I personally don't believe a word of it.

Have you ever tried to light a damp pile of anything in the garden? Plastic, cardboard, you name it, even diesel-soaked stuff is very difficult when it's cold. Now, petrol, well, just don't try it if you love life. But there you go, what do I know, eh?

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  • 241 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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