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Genetic Testing

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Is this a good thing ? We already have people having major surgery for breast removal. Because they MAY get breast cancer.

Now we may have a test to determine which women MAY be more susceptible to post natal depression.

Test

What about the placebo effect ? Surely if a woman is told they are highly likely to get this - its almost guarantee to happen !?

It would be in their mind permanently whether they liked it or not.

I don't get a good feeling about all this sort of stuff that is supposed to 'help' us.

Something just doesn't sit right with me. Not very scientific but then again us humans do really seem to have a 6th sense about certain things.

Thoughts ?

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Yes i think people have the choice.

However for many people i think it will be just too tempting to ignore.

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Is this a good thing ? We already have people having major surgery for breast removal. Because they MAY get breast cancer.

Angelina Jolie's high profile elective surgery, excellent news for Myriad Genetics stock holders and its $4,000 tests

Myriad Genetics being told a few weeks later that it can't patent human genes and enforce monopoly pricing on testing them, not such good news for stockholders

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So it's genetic, not hormone induced? So what's the cure - Don't have a baby?

I suppose that's the ultimate solution.

All this does is tell a person if they have a certain gene that CAN increase chances of depression.

Personally i would rather just not know. Then again i am a bloke so won't have to worry about it.

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Is this a good thing ? We already have people having major surgery for breast removal. Because they MAY get breast cancer.

Now we may have a test to determine which women MAY be more susceptible to post natal depression.

Test

What about the placebo effect ? Surely if a woman is told they are highly likely to get this - its almost guarantee to happen !?

It would be in their mind permanently whether they liked it or not.

I don't get a good feeling about all this sort of stuff that is supposed to 'help' us.

Something just doesn't sit right with me. Not very scientific but then again us humans do really seem to have a 6th sense about certain things.

Thoughts ?

The presence of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation increases a woman's risk of breast or ovarian cancer substantially. Some stats:

Likelihood of a 25-year-old woman surviving to age 70 (without screening or medical interventions to prevent cancer); percentage of group surviving to age 70:

Typical woman: 84%

BRCA1 mutation: 53%

BRCA2 mutation: 71%

My wife (who died of breast cancer) almost certainly carried the BRCA2 mutation, since it was found in her sister when she was also recently diagnosed with the disease. She's now had a full mastectomy and ovaries removed in order to minimise the chance of recurrence.

Edit: Also, my MIL has seen the results of the reconstructive surgery and was gushing about the skills of the surgeons. She reckoned you couldn't tell the difference from before. I refrained from saying I'd like to perform a check myself before making judgement. ;)

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Shades of Pierce Brosnans daughter here? Was it preventable?

It wasn't preventable then, but the advent of genetic testing makes it preventable. If it had been known then that she carried the mutation, she would have been screened more closely and, at the first sign of cancer, she would have had surgery and would likely still be here today.

Edit: That's breast cancer. Ovarian cancer is trickier, since once diagnosed it's often too late.

Edit: Also, it's a question that my son will have to wrestle with when he's older. There's a (close to) 50% chance that he is carrying the BRCA2 mutation and, while it's not likely to affect him, he could pass it on to any children he might have.

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I suppose that's the ultimate solution.

All this does is tell a person if they have a certain gene that CAN increase chances of depression.

Personally i would rather just not know. Then again i am a bloke so won't have to worry about it.

You will if you're the father, a depressed new mum is not the worst thing a new father could have in his life but it must be pretty close.

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Guest eight

Is this a good thing ? We already have people having major surgery for breast removal. Because they MAY get breast cancer.

Now we may have a test to determine which women MAY be more susceptible to post natal depression.

Test

What about the placebo effect ? Surely if a woman is told they are highly likely to get this - its almost guarantee to happen !?

It would be in their mind permanently whether they liked it or not.

I don't get a good feeling about all this sort of stuff that is supposed to 'help' us.

Something just doesn't sit right with me. Not very scientific but then again us humans do really seem to have a 6th sense about certain things.

Thoughts ?

Just part of the growing medicalisation of everything, I suppose.

I ask in all seriousness, what's so bad about dying? I get the impression some people see it as a personal failure, like actually admitting you're mortal is some kind of stain on your character. I made the mistake of glancing at the Daily Express today - I do wonder about the mental health of people who read that on a daily basis. Do you know how often I think about getting cancer/stroke/diabetes/heart disease? Never. If i read that heap of shit every day I'd be a gibbering wreck.

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Likelihood of a 25-year-old woman surviving to age 70 (without screening or medical interventions to prevent cancer); percentage of group surviving to age 70:

Typical woman: 84%

BRCA1 mutation: 53%

BRCA2 mutation: 71%

So with a BRCA1 mutation there is a 53% of surviving to the age 70 rather than an 84% chance. What that tells me is that even with a BRCA1 mutation (and all other risks of life!) more than half of all women with that mutation never get breast cancer!

In other words the BRCA1 mutation might increase the statistical risk of getting breast cancer but what really determines whether a woman actually gets breast cancer or not is not the BRCA1 mutation but rather other factors.

If I was a woman with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, I'd much rather adopt a healthy lifestyle than let a doctor butcher my body for a statistical risk that can much better be avoided with a healthy lifestyle.

Cancer is not a lottery, it's the final stage of a chronically unhealthy lifestyle exacerbated by environmental factors such as pollution and radiation and long-term stress.

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The presence of the BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation increases a woman's risk of breast or ovarian cancer substantially. Some stats:

Likelihood of a 25-year-old woman surviving to age 70 (without screening or medical interventions to prevent cancer); percentage of group surviving to age 70:

Typical woman: 84%

BRCA1 mutation: 53%

BRCA2 mutation: 71%

My wife (who died of breast cancer) almost certainly carried the BRCA2 mutation, since it was found in her sister when she was also recently diagnosed with the disease. She's now had a full mastectomy and ovaries removed in order to minimise the chance of recurrence.

Edit: Also, my MIL has seen the results of the reconstructive surgery and was gushing about the skills of the surgeons. She reckoned you couldn't tell the difference from before. I refrained from saying I'd like to perform a check myself before making judgement. ;)

I am with the eagle on this one. Numbers don't justify it imo. Clearly your personal situation may change your view on that. Fair enough. I am just looking at this from a 'general' angle though.

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Somehow CCC doesn't strike me as the family father type... ;):P

The cheek !!! :D

Just part of the growing medicalisation of everything, I suppose.

I ask in all seriousness, what's so bad about dying? I get the impression some people see it as a personal failure, like actually admitting you're mortal is some kind of stain on your character. I made the mistake of glancing at the Daily Express today - I do wonder about the mental health of people who read that on a daily basis. Do you know how often I think about getting cancer/stroke/diabetes/heart disease? Never. If i read that heap of shit every day I'd be a gibbering wreck.

Agreed. Shit happens in life. May as well just get on with it.

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Just part of the growing medicalisation of everything, I suppose.

I ask in all seriousness, what's so bad about dying? I get the impression some people see it as a personal failure, like actually admitting you're mortal is some kind of stain on your character. I made the mistake of glancing at the Daily Express today - I do wonder about the mental health of people who read that on a daily basis. Do you know how often I think about getting cancer/stroke/diabetes/heart disease? Never. If i read that heap of shit every day I'd be a gibbering wreck.

Most people who are overly afraid of dying are also scared of living.

Waste of a life.

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So with a BRCA1 mutation there is a 53% of surviving to the age 70 rather than an 84% chance. What that tells me is that even with a BRCA1 mutation (and all other risks of life!) more than half of all women with that mutation never get breast cancer!

In other words the BRCA1 mutation might increase the statistical risk of getting breast cancer but what really determines whether a woman actually gets breast cancer or not is not the BRCA1 mutation but rather other factors.

If I was a woman with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, I'd much rather adopt a healthy lifestyle than let a doctor butcher my body for a statistical risk that can much better be avoided with a healthy lifestyle.

Cancer is not a lottery, it's the final stage of a chronically unhealthy lifestyle exacerbated by environmental factors such as pollution and radiation and long-term stress.

The evidence that their are genetic components to many forms of cancer is overwhelming. It's logical too: our genes determine our bodily makeup with all its strengths and weaknesses. The BRCA mutations make women more susceptible to developing breast cancer; nobody claims that they guarantee an early death! The actual development of cancer could be triggered by anything, ranging from environmental factors to the presence or absence of other genes.

My wife actually led a very healthy lifestyle: she was slim, didn't smoke, drank only small amounts of alcohol, ate sensibly (using very little sugar) and exercised regularly. She was did a job she liked, lived and worked in a pleasant environment and didn't get particularly stressed. She was absolutely the last person you'd expect to get cancer at an early age.

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Just part of the growing medicalisation of everything, I suppose.

I ask in all seriousness, what's so bad about dying? I get the impression some people see it as a personal failure, like actually admitting you're mortal is some kind of stain on your character. I made the mistake of glancing at the Daily Express today - I do wonder about the mental health of people who read that on a daily basis. Do you know how often I think about getting cancer/stroke/diabetes/heart disease? Never. If i read that heap of shit every day I'd be a gibbering wreck.

We all have to die in the end, it's just that most of us would prefer it to be later rather than sooner.

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Agreed. Shit happens in life. May as well just get on with it.

That's a very fatalistic attitude. Most of us would prefer to avoid a preventable early death.

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Guest eight

That's a very fatalistic attitude. Most of us would prefer to avoid a preventable early death.

Depends what it involves, I suppose. My sympathies regarding your own circumstances, but it just goes to show that you can't take anything for granted. Might as well just get on with it and try to enjoy yourself along the way.

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That's a very fatalistic attitude. Most of us would prefer to avoid a preventable early death.

Many things may be 'preventable' but there are downsides.

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Most of my male relatives have died of comical piano winching accidents, so although I try to take doctor's advice, I am really looking out for a Steinway, 50 feet in the air! :blink:

I am not sure a genetic test can predict this! :o

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Most of my male relatives have died of comical piano winching accidents, so although I try to take doctor's advice, I am really looking out for a Steinway, 50 feet in the air! :blink:

I am not sure a genetic test can predict this! :o

You'll be OK if it's only the soft pedal that hits you.

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Most of my male relatives have died of comical piano winching accidents, so although I try to take doctor's advice, I am really looking out for a Steinway, 50 feet in the air! :blink:

I am not sure a genetic test can predict this! :o

:lol:

You nutter!

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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