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Das Ist Ein 'sh*tstorm'

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23142660

Germany's standard dictionary has included a vulgar English term, used by Chancellor Angela Merkel among others, as an acceptable German word.

Duden, the equivalent of the Oxford English Dictionary in the UK, said it was reflecting the common use of the word "sh*tstorm" among Germans.

The word, which is used in German to denote a public outcry, seems to have caught on during the eurozone crisis.

German language experts voted it "Anglicism of the year" in 2012.

One of them, Michael Mann, explained in a report by the Local newspaper, that the English word conveyed a "new kind of protest... clearly different in kind and degree from what could be expected in the past in response to a statement or action".

In the past there have been controversies over German usage of words like "download", "job-hopping" or "eye-catcher", the BBC's Steve Evans reports from Berlin.

The new word has crept into the language, imported by people who heard its use primarily in American English, he says.

It is used by the highest and lowest in the land and when Chancellor Merkel used it at a public meeting, nobody batted an eyelid, our correspondent adds.

First time I've seen a rude word not censored on the Beeb's news pages.

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-23142660

First time I've seen a rude word not censored on the Beeb's news pages.

It is used by the highest and lowest in the land and when Chancellor Merkel used it at a public meeting, nobody batted an eyelid, our correspondent adds.

Commonly used, topical words are often cross language boundaries, sometimes changing their meaning as they do so. In particular, swear words, or words containing swear words, tend to lose their potency in the other language though, this being a case in point.

My German mother-in-law, for example, who doesn't speak English, would never dream of saying the word "Scheisse" in company and would be offended by anyone else saying it. However, she's heard others using the English word "shit" and happily uses it herself to express minor annoyance. It always makes me jump when she does; I don't think I'll ever quite get used to the incongruity of it!

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Commonly used, topical words are often cross language boundaries, sometimes changing their meaning as they do so. In particular, swear words, or words containing swear words, tend to lose their potency in the other language though, this being a case in point.

My German mother-in-law, for example, who doesn't speak English, would never dream of saying the word "Scheisse" in company and would be offended by anyone else saying it. However, she's heard others using the English word "shit" and happily uses it herself to express minor annoyance. It always makes me jump when she does; I don't think I'll ever quite get used to the incongruity of it!

What about going the other way? What funny expressions used in colloquial English are obscene and offensive in their original language?

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What about going the other way? What funny expressions used in colloquial English are obscene and offensive in their original language?

Don't know... but how about this linguistic oddity... The German word for mobile phone is 'hand y', which is directly taken from the English meaning of the word i.e. convenient. So the Germans use an English word for something that the English don't use themselves.

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What about going the other way? What funny expressions used in colloquial English are obscene and offensive in their original language?

I went for a job for a company that supplied security equipment to a lot of African nations (thankfully, I didn't get the job). The interviewer was anxious that I would not be upset by cultural differences with potential customers.

He explained to me that in parts of Africa, it is perfectly acceptable to describe equipment as *f*cked', even in official literature and technical documents, where we would use terms like 'faulty' or 'unservicable'..

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What's wrong with Schei├česturm?

Nothing at all - bloody Erics should use their own lingo and not nick ours.

Maybe these fellas could help spread the word...

XYY

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In Sweden it's perfectly normal to swear. Even on tv! Even before "the watershed!" -gasp! There was even a kids TV show act that had "the swear song" - basically listing lots of swear words. Very popular.

The British are so repressed - what would the masters say if I swore? Oh dear. Can't even swear on this board. Silly.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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