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crashmonitor

Sugar Or Fat ?

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Dr. Atkins would turn in his grave at my diet. And my addiction to sugar is probably not doing my health any good. Just been to the kids sweets counter and quickly downed 100g of jelly beans (yep I'm nearly 50 not 5) at 360 calories a pop.

Otherwise I eat carbs .....bread, oats, vegetables, fruit, veg and stuff that is easily converted into sugar like red wine.

Other health issues aside (although my cholesterol has collapsed to 4 from 6 by staying away from fat), I am exceptionally lean, 30" waist, ironing board stomoch.

Carbs and sugar get such a bad press.

But my vote is sugar.

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I try to cut down on sugar but its hard. I find on days when i am booze free - i get a real rush for a sugar fix. Makes sense considering what's in beer.

Saw a really interesting Scottish tv programme about various human 'addictions'. One programme was on sugar..

Unfortunately we are hard wired to like sweet things. It is the only part of our taste that is universally linked with positives .

Only issue is today its far too easy to get whenever you want.

Back in the day folk would have stuffed their faces with berries or honey on whatever when they had the chance - and then had very little for weeks or maybe longer.

We have to somehow manage to say no to something that we are meant to stuff in our faces whenever we get the chance.

Its not easy. That's why i exercise like a ****. Don't feel so bad if i break and get myself some sweet treat.

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I try to cut down on sugar but its hard. I find on days when i am booze free - i get a real rush for a sugar fix. Makes sense considering what's in beer.

Saw a really interesting Scottish tv programme about various human 'addictions'. One programme was on sugar..

Unfortunately we are hard wired to like sweet things. It is the only part of our taste that is universally linked with positives .

Only issue is today its far too easy to get whenever you want.

Back in the day folk would have stuffed their faces with berries or honey on whatever when they had the chance - and then had very little for weeks or maybe longer.

We have to somehow manage to say no to something that we are meant to stuff in our faces whenever we get the chance.

Its not easy. That's why i exercise like a ****. Don't feel so bad if i break and get myself some sweet treat.

Exercise is probably the secret to having your cake and eating it.

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Exercise is probably the secret to having your cake and eating it.

More likely a serious gut issue...

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Dr. Atkins would turn in his grave at my diet. And my addiction to sugar is probably not doing my health any good. Just been to the kids sweets counter and quickly downed 100g of jelly beans (yep I'm nearly 50 not 5) at 360 calories a pop.

Otherwise I eat carbs .....bread, oats, vegetables, fruit, veg and stuff that is easily converted into sugar like red wine.

Other health issues aside (although my cholesterol has collapsed to 4 from 6 by staying away from fat), I am exceptionally lean, 30" waist, ironing board stomoch.

Carbs and sugar get such a bad press.

But my vote is sugar.

Bumnp this thread when you reach 100. Then we'll know.

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I'm reasonably sure, for me, fat trumps sugar.

I do permit myself a sugary binge every now and again, scarf a load of junk down, feel like cr@p immediately afterwards, ask myself what possessed me, then leave it alone until the memory dims once more.

Exercise is going to help, especially when you're younger, but I suspect twenty, thirty years of hefty sugar spikes will probably take their toll on your blood sugar regulation mechanisms eventually.

Of course, if that were true there'd be an epidemic of people with stuffed-up blood sugar in countries where people load up on sugary cr@p.

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...writes the man who bought 10kg of cane sugar (and four jars of honey) to fuel various homebrew projects last Saturday

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Sugar is evil. I crave it. It makes me even hungrier if I eat it. I can basically eat it non stop

Fat makes me feel full. After a big healthy meal, I can go 24 hours without even thinking about food.

Even after a big meal, when I couldn't squeeze another thing inside me, I would still be able to eat a dessert, if I let myself. (I suspect there may be logic to it - sugar provides instant energy which will actually help digest the food in your stomach. If you're just eating fat, then the body can't digest it fast enough from its own resources, so you need to pause.)

When I'm bored and think "I wish I had some chocolate biscuits in the house", and make an effort to think what I might like to eat instead (some macaroni cheese? Steak?) I realise that Im not really hungry.

Remember also, that some things that you might be counting as "fatty", like burgers with various relishes, and many ready meals or pizzas can have getting on for 10% sugar in them.

There are other foods that are also moreish and which I tend not have ib the house, e.g. peanuts. Probably the salt.

But I suspect different people react differently to different intakes

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Nothing wrong with unprocessed animal fats. Nothing.

Refined sugars and starchy carbs are the flab culprits.

But mostly, though, it's a case of real foods vs. junk.

I know a lot of posters are aware of paleo. Check that out.

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But mostly, though, it's a case of real foods vs. junk.

That's a fair point. Once you give up sugar, you pretty much have to give up all industrially produced foodstuffs

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Nothing wrong with unprocessed animal fats. Nothing.

Refined sugars and starchy carbs are the flab culprits.

Absolutely this in my opinion.

All through the 70's and 80's we had massive ad campaigns about eating less fat, we now see most of our shelves stocked with low fat products. Yet we are fatter than ever. The only culprit in my opinion is over consumption, the only role fat plays in the equation is there are 9 cals per gram as opposed to 4 cals for carbs and protein, the higher your fat intake the higher potentially your calories intake will be.

Ultimately the classic high fat diet is just a high calorie diet. The difference is the body is designed to process that fat, it's not designed to process the sugar and carb heavy diet we do it. Keep to a low (or normal) calorie diet and it's all good, although personally I'd prefer those calories to come from unprocessed animal fats and vegetables rather than highly processed sugar and carbs.

Also depends on how old you are... I was skinny as a rake when I was in my teens and twenties. Could eat anything I fancied.

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I go days just eating butter and cream.

Yep, that's the stuff my grandparents ate and they all lived until their late eighties.

The men worked in a coal-mine and a steelworks - hardly renowned for health benefits - and the women ran the homes and prepared all the food from fresh ingredients.

What they didn't eat was processed food.

Or margarine - they wouldn't entertain it.

And I could imagine their reaction if anyone were to suggest they try skimmed milk.

Both my nanas could bake pies, bread and scones for Britain.

And they rubbed lard and butter into flour for pastry, or suet for dumplings.

Most of the pensioners alive today who are living way beyond what the governments of yesterday calculated as their life-expectancies had very similar diets.

What they didn't have was do-gooders and control freaks telling them what was best for them...

XYY

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Yep, that's the stuff my grandparents ate and they all lived until their late eighties.

The men worked in a coal-mine and a steelworks - hardly renowned for health benefits - and the women ran the homes and prepared all the food from fresh ingredients.

What they didn't eat was processed food.

Or margarine - they wouldn't entertain it.

What they didn't have was do-gooders and control freaks telling them what was best for them...

XYY

http://www.ericcressey.com/healthy-food-options-why-you-should-never-take-nutrition-advice-from-your-government

A guy here says vegetable fat Bad....animal fat Good.

AND : http://www.leangains.com/2010/06/diet-mythology-ancel-keys-fat-fallacy.html :)

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I imagine we have been eating a lot of animal fats for the majority of our time on this planet.

I very much doubt you can say the same for high amounts of sugar.

Our bodies cannot really cope with it - that's for sure.

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I imagine we have been eating a lot of animal fats for the majority of our time on this planet.

I very much doubt you can say the same for high amounts of sugar.

Our bodies cannot really cope with it - that's for sure.

Indeed.

Not an expert, but I think the mechanisms are pretty well understood and it basically comes down to this -

Sugar and processed carbs = blood sugar spike = release of insulin = body stores fat instead of burning it = weight gain.

Over decades of this constant cycle, eventually the insulin release mechanism is shagged and diabetes ensues.

Without the excessive carbs, the body burns the fat to release energy, which was our normal state for millions of years.

In this context, fat is only bad when combined with sugar and processed carbs. By itself, it is essential to our health.

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Not really a fan of sweet things! I fancy a bacon sandwich, with a fried egg on it! ;)

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Sweet enough......fat it has to be, none of that reduced, lite or half fat nonsense at full price....buy half the amount but only full fat rocks. ;)

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Well I just about remember adverts about "go to work on an egg" and drink a pint of milk a day! Where is that lovely milk now with about three inches of cream at the top of the bottle? :blink:

I also remember "bread and dripping" sandwiches! My mum is 87.. ;)

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Nothing wrong with unprocessed animal fats. Nothing.

Refined sugars and starchy carbs are the flab culprits.

But mostly, though, it's a case of real foods vs. junk.

I know a lot of posters are aware of paleo. Check that out.

I agree. I've lost some weight over the past few years, about three stone. Last autumn I decided I wanted abs, which basically involves dropping body fat <10%. I reduced my carb intake, no pasta, white rice, bread, etc, but found I'd hit a plateau and couldn't shift the last bit of fat just under my belly button. The past four weeks I've only been eating foods with a GI index <55. This excludes pretty much anything containing refined sugar, plus many fruits. The fat has vanished. Yes, I'm starting to see my abs...

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;)

The good news being that after years of medical advice that Type 2 diabetes is irreversible it turns out that, for some at least, it is reversible...

Guardian: Type 2 diabetes and the diet that cured me

We're still not quite there yet as the 'cure' is reportedly the result of a ultra-low calorie diet - c.800 a day. Funnily enough, those ultra-low calorie diets also just happen to be low carb...

Others have also changed their lives through the diet. Carlos Cervantes, 53 and from the US, was at death's door when he tried it. He weighed 120kg, suffered a heart attack in spring 2011, his eyesight and kidneys were failing and he faced having an infected toe amputated. He even had fungus growing out of his ears, feeding on his ultra-high blood sugar levels. But after seeing a TV report on the Newcastle research, he started eating only 600 calories a day, replacing the supplements with not just vegetables but fruit, lean chicken, turkey, occasional bread and a daily milkshake. Two months later he had lost 40kg and 18 months later he is still free of his type 2 diabetes.

Henry Cole, 67, from New Jersey, USA, did likewise. He saw a 20-second news clip on TV and took up the diet days later. He stuck rigidly to 600 calories daily from just protein (steak, chicken, turkey or fish) plus green veg, eating his one meal at 6pm most days, with coffee and calorie-counted cream for breakfast and 1.5 litres of water. His weight went down from 81kg to a stable 70kg on a now daily 1,500 cal diet, with his HbA1c level down to 5.6% from 6.9%.

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I always had having a 'sweet tooth' as being a feminine thing. My father in law always used to say, "you don't see men going out stuffing their faces with cream cakes together". And he's right.

1220062688_9b2f.jpg

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;)

The good news being that after years of medical advice that Type 2 diabetes is irreversible it turns out that, for some at least, it is reversible...

Guardian: Type 2 diabetes and the diet that cured me

We're still not quite there yet as the 'cure' is reportedly the result of a ultra-low calorie diet - c.800 a day. Funnily enough, those ultra-low calorie diets also just happen to be low carb...

Wow, fascinating stuff.

I do wonder how much influence the food industry has had over dietary science during the past three or four decades - it does seem that it has taken a long long time for us to come to the conclusion that refined sugar, refined flour and trans fats are the ones doing the most harm, rather than the animal fats that we've been consuming for thousands of years.... and even now this is only seemingly obvious to those people who do their own research into these matters - the mainstream media and dieticians still seem to be peddling the old mantras. And let's not even get started on the 'diet' foods industry!

;)

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Wow, fascinating stuff.

I do wonder how much influence the food industry has had over dietary science during the past three or four decades - it does seem that it has taken a long long time for us to come to the conclusion that refined sugar, refined flour and trans fats are the ones doing the most harm, rather than the animal fats that we've been consuming for thousands of years.... and even now this is only seemingly obvious to those people who do their own research into these matters - the mainstream media and dieticians still seem to be peddling the old mantras. And let's not even get started on the 'diet' foods industry!

;)

Problem is there are two camps in my opinion...

I have been morbidly obese, over 25 stone at one point. I'd broadly agree with the standard advice on diet, low(ish) fats, a range of fruit and veg and a mix of whole grain style carbs (although they would be the things I would be most suspicious of). However if you are in any way over weight switching to that is not going to do you any favours, you need to do something a little more drastic.

It seems diet is one of the few things where experience seems to count for nothing, why put your faith in people who have never had to seriously face the challenge of serious weight reduction. The low fat mantra is so deeply ingrained in our minds that it becomes the total focus of any effort, I know I was in that mind set for years, didn't eat an ounce of fat, but what I did do was stuff my face with rice, pasta, bread.

As for the food industry, they are in the business of making money, if the advice is low fat then that is what they will make. Of course it is then stuffed full of sugar and processed stuff to replace the fats. It then of course becomes self generating, people jump on the band wagon and we get more and more and more of the stuff.

While weight is ultimately all about self responsibility it doesn't help people when they get force fed the wrong information and pushed down blind alleys.

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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