Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum
Sign in to follow this  
campervanman

Eu Roaming Charges Fall From Today

Recommended Posts

Most reasonable people are not against the EU as a whole, they are against the excesses of centralisation that have developed in the last 15 years. I was in favour of the EU as it was in the '90s I just don't like how it has been morphing into a centralised totalitarian superstate in recent years.

I don't think leaving the EU would solve anything, the EU needs to be reformed from within.

I'm benefiting myself from one of the nicer aspects of EU rules, freedom of movement, as it allowed me to move to another European country without all the hassle that comes with moving to countries outside of the EU (like Canada, the US, and so on where you have to go through a long-winded complicated and expensive VISA process).

Edited by The Eagle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23098623

Lower charges only apply within the borders of the EU.

I wonder if UKIP or the DM/Sun have a view?

Your other point about competition is more interesting. It has been apparent for some time that roaming charges (esp. data) were a bit of a cash cow for the operators. In a "free market" you would have expected one of them to break ranks in order to win custom from their competitors. The fact that none of them did without their hand being forced clearly demonstrates cartel behaviour. How about some retrospective refunds into the bargain?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your other point about competition is more interesting. It has been apparent for some time that roaming charges (esp. data) were a bit of a cash cow for the operators. In a "free market" you would have expected one of them to break ranks in order to win custom from their competitors. The fact that none of them did without their hand being forced clearly demonstrates cartel behaviour. How about some retrospective refunds into the bargain?

A bit OT, but I've never really understood how cartels work. Why does a cartel prevent anyone breaking ranks? Why do competitors not come along who are not part of the cartel?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

A bit OT, but I've never really understood how cartels work. Why does a cartel prevent anyone breaking ranks? Why do competitors not come along who are not part of the cartel?

Usually, regulation. Like in this case, there are only so many operator licenses. Perfect cartel breeding conditions.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23098623

Lower charges only apply within the borders of the EU.

I wonder if UKIP or the DM/Sun have a view?

Apparently, the list of countries are:

UK, Northern Ireland, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canary Islands, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark ,France, Germany, Greece, Guadeloupe, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden.

Monaco, Norway, San Marido are not part of EU (Norway is EEC) and they still get the benefits. EEC will do just fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

getting that sms from tmobile makes me think i will not have to buy a local sim pay as you go on my next holiday in two weeks as the cost of a roaming call will be cheaper.

Only trouble is when your family needs to contact you (they live in that country on local charges.). For them it will be international call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you know if the data prices have come down with T-Mobile - it still looks quite expensive on their website for Poland where I'm travelling in a few weeks?

I've ordered a 3G dongle (unlocked) off ebay for about £20, and will see if I can pick up a local pay-as-you-go SIM (probably also from the Polish version of T-Mobile) at a reasonable price.

getting that sms from tmobile makes me think i will not have to buy a local sim pay as you go on my next holiday in two weeks as the cost of a roaming call will be cheaper.

Only trouble is when your family needs to contact you (they live in that country on local charges.). For them it will be international call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-23098623

Lower charges only apply within the borders of the EU.

I wonder if UKIP or the DM/Sun have a view?

Well, I don't know about anyone else but this has completely changed my views on the European Union.

I used to be skeptical about such a centralised, unelected, unaccountable parasitic socialistic and obviously corrupt political union, thinking that localism and less beaurocracy and less petty rules and pointless directives and laws could actually make life better for everyone.

But now they've made it cheaper to text my mummy when I'm on the Costas, I can let that all slide.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I don't know about anyone else but this has completely changed my views on the European Union.

I used to be skeptical about such a centralised, unelected, unaccountable parasitic socialistic and obviously corrupt political union, thinking that localism and less beaurocracy and less petty rules and pointless directives and laws could actually make life better for everyone.

But now they've made it cheaper to text my mummy when I'm on the Costas, I can let that all slide.

:lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A bit OT, but I've never really understood how cartels work. Why does a cartel prevent anyone breaking ranks? Why do competitors not come along who are not part of the cartel?

not many competitors with the kit or the cash to compete in this cartel.

costs of entry are vast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently, the list of countries are:

UK, Northern Ireland, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canary Islands, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark ,France, Germany, Greece, Guadeloupe, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden.

Monaco, Norway, San Marido are not part of EU (Norway is EEC) and they still get the benefits. EEC will do just fine.

Sure, if you don't like democracy. Personally, I find voting for my MEPs and having a Commissioner, members in the council, and on the committee, is quite the benefit.

What all the countries you labelled have is the costs - paying into budgets, none of which is spent in them. Unlike us.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, if you don't like democracy. Personally, I find voting for my MEPs and having a Commissioner, members in the council, and on the committee, is quite the benefit.

What all the countries you labelled have is the costs - paying into budgets, none of which is spent in them. Unlike us.

An EUphile lecturing others about Democracy, very cute.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, if you don't like democracy. Personally, I find voting for my MEPs and having a Commissioner, members in the council, and on the committee, is quite the benefit.

What all the countries you labelled have is the costs - paying into budgets, none of which is spent in them. Unlike us.

The Eurocrats do not understand democracy...just expand their empires and their fat expenses, salaries and pensions

Edited by THE BALD MAN

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently, the list of countries are:

UK, Northern Ireland, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canary Islands, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark ,France, Germany, Greece, Guadeloupe, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden.

Monaco, Norway, San Marido are not part of EU (Norway is EEC) and they still get the benefits. EEC will do just fine.

What would the Sun/Mail/UKIP have to say about a Norway style arrangement (pay more and have no influence) though? I'm sure it wouldn't be long before they started to wind up the electorate again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What would the Sun/Mail/UKIP have to say about a Norway style arrangement (pay more and have no influence) though? I'm sure it wouldn't be long before they started to wind up the electorate again.

No influence...but Norway also get to pick and choose and it is far cheaper: Looks like EEA/EFTA related contribution also consist of 2.4% of the total EU budget..and if it is so, the rest of 97.5% are borne by the full EU members (?)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norway%E2%80%93European_Union_relations

The EEA EFTA participation is hence on an equal footing with EU member states. The total EEA EFTA commitment amounts to 2.4% of the overall EU programme budget . In 2008 Norway’s contribution was €188 million. Throughout the programme period 2007—2013, the Norwegian contribution will increase substantially in parallel with the development of the EU programme budget, from €130 million in 2007 to €290 million in 2013.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No influence...but Norway also get to pick and choose and it is far cheaper: Looks like EEA/EFTA related contribution also consist of 2.4% of the total EU budget..and if it is so, the rest of 97.5% are borne by the full EU members (?)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norway%E2%80%93European_Union_relations

The EEA EFTA participation is hence on an equal footing with EU member states. The total EEA EFTA commitment amounts to 2.4% of the overall EU programme budget . In 2008 Norway’s contribution was €188 million. Throughout the programme period 2007—2013, the Norwegian contribution will increase substantially in parallel with the development of the EU programme budget, from €130 million in 2007 to €290 million in 2013.

The non-EU EEA members have a total population of about 5.5 million compared to the the 503 million of the EU. It would be surprising if they were contributing more than 2.4% of the EU budget.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

An EUphile lecturing others about Democracy, very cute.

Living, as I do, in a very safe Conservative constituency within a system that includes a monarchy and hereditary peers, the only vote I get that can make any difference whatsoever is the one for the European Parliament. And is it not just a little ironic that UKIP, a party claiming that criticises the EU for a perceived democratic deficit, has MEPs but no MPs?

Brits should perhaps look a little closer to home before lecturing others on democracy!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The non-EU EEA members have a total population of about 5.5 million compared to the the 503 million of the EU. It would be surprising if they were contributing more than 2.4% of the EU budget.

I am not sure but the way I read it is that EEA-EFTA budget is only 2.4% of Total EU budget. So, out of £100 UK pays into the EU, £2.40 are for its EEA-EFTA involvement and £97.60 for its 'EU' commitment. Further, it appears that since Thatcher time, the 'influence' can only be exercised if the French and the Germany agree.

In any case, Norway GDP is $485 billion and it contributed around e290 million / $400 million @ <0.1% of its GDP.

UK on the other hand contributed 12.1 billion euros (after rebate) or around $16 billion or 0.6% of the GDP ( about 6x as expensive) and Norway is about 2-3x richer per capita than the UK.

Any EU expert here who can clarify ?

Edited by easy2012

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Apparently, the list of countries are:

UK, Northern Ireland, Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canary Islands, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark ,France, Germany, Greece, Guadeloupe, Hungary, Italy, Lithuania, Malta, Monaco, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden.

Monaco, Norway, San Marido are not part of EU (Norway is EEC) and they still get the benefits. EEC will do just fine.

Last I heard, Northern Ireland was part of the UK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was intruiged by the BBC's idea of a weeks typical data use.

Data used during a week's trip

Checking a map five times

Checking social media accounts every day for half an hour

Uploading one photo every day

Sending one email per day

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Living, as I do, in a very safe Conservative constituency within a system that includes a monarchy and hereditary peers, the only vote I get that can make any difference whatsoever is the one for the European Parliament. And is it not just a little ironic that UKIP, a party claiming that criticises the EU for a perceived democratic deficit, has MEPs but no MPs?

Brits should perhaps look a little closer to home before lecturing others on democracy!

You live in a safe seat, that is just unfortunate and of course rather frustrating but there seems little way of avoiding this with the FPTP system while preserving a sensible number of elected representatives. I lived in a marginal seat at the last election, but even then it was obvious the incumbent Labour MP was going to be removed as the majority was about 1,500.

If the UK were to adopt a different system, UKIP could be properly represented in line with their share of the popular vote, which on current trends might be over 100 MPs. I'm not sure whether that's something you would be happy to accept in return for a greater say locally. I voted to keep the FPTP system in the recent referendum on AV, but there's no doubt it greatly hampers a party like UKIP.

Besides, UKIP will send Dave to a (well earned) defeat in 2015, whether they have any MPs or not, if current voting intentions are roughly preserved between now and then. My MP is a Con with a majority of 2,500 or so, must be a target for Labour and they will be unlucky not to get it if UKIP take 10% or more in addition to Dave's general unpopularity.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.