Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Frank Hovis

Out Of Date Language

Recommended Posts

I was pulled up on another forum for saying about somebody being "duffed up" and accused of living in the 1950s :huh:

Are you sill using anything antiquated in daily speech?

I will also 'fess up to Latin, not a lot but things like "terra incognita" for anywhere a bit remote and suchlike which nobody ever understands but I use as I think it suits.

Oh, and antediluvian and superannuated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I drop the occasional Latin, I'm afraid.

Slang (like "duffed up") moves so rapidly, everyone's out of date by the time they're 25. I've been mixing with some youngsters lately and the slang may as well be Greek to me.

The dated language I find interesting is those stock phrases and comparisons which have outlived understanding. For example, cumulonimbus clouds are "anvil shaped" - yet when was the last time anyone saw an anvil (outside of Looney Tunes)? "Missed by a fag paper" is rapidly ageing as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I knew what duffed up meant, it was the main term used for someone who came off worst in a fight or bundle.

This thread could be groovy-cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was pulled up on another forum for saying about somebody being "duffed up" and accused of living in the 1950s :huh:

Sounds like a bit of a farrago.

I dig antiquated turns of phrase deeply. It the kind of bag I'm into in a way that really lights my candle. Seventies blaxploitation, Polari and Victorian street urchin are personal favourites

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

and lest ye forget shipmates,

international "talk like a pirate day" Sept 19th

Advanced pirate lingo; or On beyond “Aarrr!”

Once you've mastered the basics, you're ready to start expanding your pirate vocabulary. Try these for starters

Beauty – The best possible pirate address for a woman. Always preceded by “me,” as in, “C’mere, me beauty,” or even, “me buxom beauty,” to one particularly well endowed. You’ll be surprised how effective this is.

Bilge rat – The bilge is the lowest level of the ship. It’s loaded with ballast and slimy, reeking water. A bilge rat, then, is a rat that lives in the worst place on the ship. On TLAP Day – A lot of guy humor involves insulting your buddies to prove your friendship. It’s important that everyone understand you are smarter, more powerful and much luckier with the wenches than they are. Since bilge rat is a pretty dirty thing to call someone, by all means use it on your friends.

Bung hole – Victuals on a ship were stored in wooden casks. The stopper in the barrel is called the bung, and the hole is called the bung hole. That’s all. It sounds a lot worse, doesn’t it? On TLAP Day – When dinner is served you’ll make quite an impression when you say, “Well, me hearties, let’s see what crawled out of the bung hole.” That statement will be instantly followed by the sound of people putting down their utensils and pushing themselves away from the table. Great! More for you!

Grog – An alcoholic drink, usually rum diluted with water, but in this context you could use it to refer to any alcoholic beverage other than beer, and we aren’t prepared to be picky about that, either. Call your beer grog if you want. We won’t stop you! Water aboard ship was stored for long periods in slimy wooden barrels, so you can see why rum was added to each sailor’s water ration – to kill the rancid taste. On TLAP Day – Drink up, me hearties! And call whatever you’re drinking grog if you want to. If some prissy pedant purses his lips and protests the word grog can only be used if drinking rum and water, not the Singapore Sling you’re holding, keelhaul him!

Hornpipe – Both a single-reeded musical instrument sailors often had aboard ship, and a spirited dance that sailors do. On TLAP Day – We are not big fans of the capering, it’s not our favorite art form, if you will, so we don’t have a lot to say on the subject, other than to observe that the common term for being filled with lust is “horny,” and hornpipe then has some comical possibilities. “Is that a hornpipe in your pocket, or are you just glad to see me? Or both?”

Lubber – (or land lubber) This is the seaman’s version of land lover, mangled by typical pirate disregard for elocution. A lubber is someone who does not go to sea, who stays on the land. On TLAP Day – More likely than not, you are a lubber 364 days of the year. But not if you’re talking like a pirate! Then the word lubber becomes one of the more fierce weapons in your arsenal of piratical lingo. In a room where everyone is talking like pirates, lubber is ALWAYS an insult.

Smartly – Do something quickly. On TLAP Day – “Smartly, me lass,” you might say when sending the bar maid off for another round. She will be so impressed she might well spit in your beer.

http://www.talklikeapirate.com/howto.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching a 1980s British drama last night and somebody saying they had been chucked by their partner as opposed to dumped stood out. I guess we change with the times.

When I was at school in the 1970s the word skill was very vogue and had multiple meanings, went somewhere and it was skill, scored a goal, skill. Now I can't see a single reference to the usage of the word on google. Perhaps the use of the word sick as used by school kids now will be forgotten by the 2050s.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a bit of a farrago.

You sound like Russell Brand.

People always giggle when I refer to the "gramophone" - what do they call it these days? iPode or somesuch?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was watching a 1980s British drama last night and somebody saying they had been chucked by their partner as opposed to dumped stood out. I guess we change with the times.

When I was at school in the 1970s the word skill was very vogue and had multiple meanings, went somewhere and it was skill, scored a goal, skill. Now I can't see a single reference to the usage of the word on google. Perhaps the use of the word sick as used by school kids now will be forgotten by the 2050s.

You've brought memories back -- skill was very much the word as you say, and back then it really irritated me, I never used it for that reason, but so many did.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You sound like Russell Brand.

People always giggle when I refer to the "gramophone" - what do they call it these days? iPode or somesuch?

My kids tell me off for saying "telephone" instead of "mobile" or, if I must, "'phone". They say I speak as if it was 1920.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You've brought memories back -- skill was very much the word as you say, and back then it really irritated me, I never used it for that reason, but so many did.

It was still around in the early 80s, I remember using it at school (I was probably 7 or so at the time) and my mum telling me that it was wrong. I didn't see why it was any different from any other word so ignored her.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids tell me off for saying "telephone" instead of "mobile" or, if I must, "'phone". They say I speak as if it was 1920.

Strictly speaking, to distinguish it from a landline, a mobile is a wireless telephone. Maybe your kids would happier if you started calling it that?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My kids tell me off for saying "telephone" instead of "mobile" or, if I must, "'phone". They say I speak as if it was 1920.

If they want a mobile then give them one although most children outgrow those by the time they've stopped sleeping in cots.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strictly speaking, to distinguish it from a landline, a mobile is a wireless telephone. Maybe your kids would happier if you started calling it that?

I'm surprised the kids don't call it a 'cell' like Americans.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised the kids don't call it a 'cell' like Americans.

In the same way that Her Majesty's constabulary are now all 'feds' apparently

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i had a fun exchange on another (leftish) forum where somebody was complaining bitterly about the word "Gay" having been "hi-jacked" by modern yoof to mean "rubbish" thus subverting its PC connotation.

I pointed out that the word "hi-jacked" has itself changed in meaning from its former usage in the 1940s* which was "to steal that which is already stolen", ie. to steal from thieves.

which being the case, I congratulated the OP for properly respecting the original nuance.

He didn't get it.

*It's used like this explicity in the Raymond Chandler-scripted movie "The Big Sleep".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It was still around in the early 80s, I remember using it at school (I was probably 7 or so at the time) and my mum telling me that it was wrong. I didn't see why it was any different from any other word so ignored her.

I was at school with kids who would say something that sounded to my ears like "doosh" as they did something, especially any winning move in a game (of marbles, for example)

Strictly speaking, to distinguish it from a landline, a mobile is a wireless telephone. Maybe your kids would happier if you started calling it that?

:D Yes right in front of their friends, for example! That would be wizard!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strictly speaking, to distinguish it from a landline, a mobile is a wireless telephone. Maybe your kids would happier if you started calling it that?

That'd confuse them a lot. The idea of a telephone being tethered to a wall. They've never lived in a house with a landline and I wonder if they've even seen one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That would be wizard!

Positively spiffing

Talk Like a Pirate Day is all very well and good but Talk Like Terry Thomas Day now that, that would be top hole

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That'd confuse them a lot. The idea of a telephone being tethered to a wall. They've never lived in a house with a landline and I wonder if they've even seen one.

Tell them that in your day 'Siri' was called 'Operator'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sounds like a bit of a farrago.

I dig antiquated turns of phrase deeply. It the kind of bag I'm into in a way that really lights my candle. Seventies blaxploitation, Polari and Victorian street urchin are personal favourites

You're a rum cove, and no mistake. Most of them brats are on the kinchin lay. I'll wager your kingsman's gone west already...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Positively spiffing

Talk Like a Pirate Day is all very well and good but Talk Like Terry Thomas Day now that, that would be top hole

How times's change! No worries about exhaust emissions, and he was smoking at the petrol station! :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You're a rum cove, and no mistake. Most of them brats are on the kinchin lay. I'll wager your kingsman's gone west already...

:lol:

That's diamond

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Strictly speaking, to distinguish it from a landline, a mobile is a wireless telephone. Maybe your kids would happier if you started calling it that?

Talking of wireless, I'm always getting ticked off by my daughter for referring to the radio as a wireless. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.