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justthisbloke

What Do You Pay For P Y O Strawbs?

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We had to cough up £1.60 a pound yesterday. I had £1 a pound in my mind so felt a bit robbed. Is my faulty price memory to blame; or is it inflation; or a gouging farmer?

Still we bought 6 kilos and made a shed load of excellent jam. Albeit, the world's most expensive jam.

I'm growing my own from now on.

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We had to cough up £1.60 a pound yesterday. I had £1 a pound in my mind so felt a bit robbed. Is my faulty price memory to blame; or is it inflation; or a gouging farmer?

Still we bought 6 kilos and made a shed load of excellent jam. Albeit, the world's most expensive jam.

I'm growing my own from now on.

I can remember paying 25p a lb in east Sussex in 1976.

How would inflation work out ?

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Just goes to show what good value the supermarkets offer. All that work and the logistics done for you, and scarcely a difference in price.

Yes, I too recollect pick-your-own in the 70s, when it was a whole lot less than shop prices. Though I also have a recollection of picking gooseberries while other family members did strawberries: same local farm grew both.

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Just goes to show what good value the supermarkets offer. All that work and the logistics done for you, and scarcely a difference in price.

Yes, I too recollect pick-your-own in the 70s, when it was a whole lot less than shop prices. Though I also have a recollection of picking gooseberries while other family members did strawberries: same local farm grew both.

There's still the advantage of freshness; from leaving the house to walk to the strawb field to screwing the last jam pot lid on was about 2 hours. The supermarket ones will have had the flavour chilled out of 'em even if they're not days old or transported from Timbuktu.

That said, I ain't paying £1.60 again. I've got a pretty big garden so can afford to set aside a mega-strawberry patch. And get the turnaround time to under 1 hour.

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I think I bought 6 plants at 1.50 each a couple of years ago and now I have about 200 strawberry plants in my garden and on the plot. I reckon I must have given about 100 more away. The buggers send out runners like mad.

It looks a good year for strawberries here if we get some sun in the next week or so.

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If you're bothered about the value of a pick-your-own price then you can always skew the deal in your favour by operating a 'two for the tub, one for me' policy B)

I think the farmers price on the basis that people do that anyway.

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Used to go and pick them down Gower but tbe cost is now just too silly bearing in mind the time and the backache.

Found ways to get over that. ;)

strawberries-1.jpg

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Yes, I must admit even when I was working as strawberry picker one summer - I figured it was simply a great way to absolutely gorge yourself on what is normally quite an expensive fruit. and get paid for it. I'd never consider pick your own on anything but that basis - a day out in the countryside eating free strawberries.

It also used to make me laugh that the crates we were loading the punnets into all implied they were grown in Covent Garden or Kent - when we were picking them in Staffordshire.

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@winkie - is that your crop? Nice work.

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I'm more honest than most of you and wouldn't gorge myself, even so my wife was once reprimanded for feeding our toddler a strawberry in the field.

Ken yon Hall tight duckers and expensive - think it was £4/kg even last year so £1.60/lb seems a bargain.

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Talking of pick-your-own, does anyone actually buy those fruits that are abundant around us and can easily be gathered without nicking them from anyone? I'm thinking above all blackberries, which seem to be super-abundant in most of the country. I love the blueberries I pick for myself too, but they're much harder work.

And then there's nature's bounty that you can't buy in the regular shops at all. Spring stuff is past its best, but at a pinch you could still gather wild garlic or wild nettles.

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Talking of pick-your-own, does anyone actually buy those fruits that are abundant around us and can easily be gathered without nicking them from anyone? I'm thinking above all blackberries, which seem to be super-abundant in most of the country. I love the blueberries I pick for myself too, but they're much harder work.

And then there's nature's bounty that you can't buy in the regular shops at all. Spring stuff is past its best, but at a pinch you could still gather wild garlic or wild nettles.

I go blackberry picking but the ones in the shops are far fuller and juicer. We need more sunshine.

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Talking of pick-your-own, does anyone actually buy those fruits that are abundant around us and can easily be gathered without nicking them from anyone? I'm thinking above all blackberries, which seem to be super-abundant in most of the country. I love the blueberries I pick for myself too, but they're much harder work.

And then there's nature's bounty that you can't buy in the regular shops at all. Spring stuff is past its best, but at a pinch you could still gather wild garlic or wild nettles.

Of course, there's a great little book called "Food for Free" by Richard Mabley for those new to foraging. You can find stuff to eat most months of the year - only December/January is a bit limited. Just exercise a little consideration for the other creatures which don't have the option of hunter gathering in their local supermarket.

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Of course, there's a great little book called "Food for Free" by Richard Mabley for those new to foraging. You can find stuff to eat most months of the year - only December/January is a bit limited. Just exercise a little consideration for the other creatures which don't have the option of hunter gathering in their local supermarket.

Hedgerow Jelly comes highly recommended....September time. ;)

a variety fruit from the hedgerow or garden: blackberries, elderberries, sloes, damsons, wild plums, haws, rosehips.

An equal weight of either cooking or crab apples

Sugar 1lb (500g) per 1 pint (600ml) juice

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I go blackberry picking but the ones in the shops are far fuller and juicer. We need more sunshine.

It's not the sunshine it's the cultivar. Wild blackberries aren't pruned and aren't selected for fruit size and flavour.

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Talking of pick-your-own, does anyone actually buy those fruits that are abundant around us and can easily be gathered without nicking them from anyone? I'm thinking above all blackberries, which seem to be super-abundant in most of the country. I love the blueberries I pick for myself too, but they're much harder work.

And then there's nature's bounty that you can't buy in the regular shops at all. Spring stuff is past its best, but at a pinch you could still gather wild garlic or wild nettles.

I find it hard to believe that supermarkets actually sell blackberries. I've always picked 'em - it wouldn't seem right to buy a chilled pack.

Don't forage a huge amount for other stuff; I'm not 100% certain of my identification skills. I do grab shellfish from time to time - but always a bit worried about how pure they might be.

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but always a bit worried about how pure they might be.

You might be, but I bet the fishermen/wholesalers/middlemen/supermarket aren't to fussed when they handle the ones you buy from the shop in good faith :)

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I go blackberry picking but the ones in the shops are far fuller and juicer. We need more sunshine.

I don't agree - wild UK ones are a bit sharper and less sweet but have more flavour IMO than the bought variety.

Fresh picked - stewed for 5-10 mins with a bit of water and sugar, with a decent quality vanilla icecream and some double cream, yum.

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Blackberry picking, I find there are about three types of wild blackberry, some tiny ones with lots of small berries on one berry, up to the larger softer berries with fewer larger berries on one berry.....they all taste good.

The really good thing about picking wild blackberries is that they ripen at different times over a number of weeks meaning that they can't all be picked together and there will always be some left for others and most importantly the birds and other wildlife who adore them. ;)

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The really good thing about picking wild blackberries is that they ripen at different times over a number of weeks meaning that they can't all be picked together and there will always be some left for others and most importantly the birds and other wildlife who adore them. ;)

Yep.

In 2003 I was still picking blackberries into the second half of November. Of course they were well beyond the season when you'd want to eat them, but beggars can't be choosers.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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