Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

reddog

Ban Parents Watching Sports Day?

Recommended Posts

A lot of HPC posts generally subscribe to the idea that the UK would be a lot better if we all showed a bit of back bone and stopped being so namby pamby. On the whole I generally agree with this.

But can't help thinking strongly discouraging (banning is probably not right for all cases) parents from watching sports day is a good idea.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/education/educationnews/10135434/Parents-banned-from-sports-day-in-case-children-get-stressed.html

This is mainly based on the experiences of an old friend who was pushed pretty/very hard by his dad to make it as a pro footballer.

My friend was pushed from primary school, he was always first choice for our senior school team, played for the local premier league club youth team, but never got a "YTS" with the club. Having being pushed for so long he eventually got sick of it and completely gave up playing at 18 or 19.

With his sporting ability my friend was always very popular at school, at 14 or 15 you would have thought he was the sort of person who was thriving on being watched in a big match, but various slightly drunk conversions in our late teen and twenties showed how much pressure he was feeling before he was even 14 years old, I would say his dads constant pressure really f-ed him up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh Jesus H Tap-dancing Christ.

Sports are competitive. It inherently puts pressure on kids. Their successes should be encouraged and their efforts praised. Schools are a centre of communities and such family events are social occasions and contribute to the cohesion of the community. They are an opportunity for parents to share time with teachers and children. Participation in competition is part of a child's preparation for adulthood, including dealing with disappointment and enjoying other people's success.

It's not a caucus race. Pathetic.

Anyone who can't see this, should be kept away from children, Especially if they are teachers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

With his sporting ability my friend was always very popular at school, at 14 or 15 you would have thought he was the sort of person who was thriving on being watched in a big match, but various slightly drunk conversions in our late teen and twenties showed how much pressure he was feeling before he was even 14 years old, I would say his dads constant pressure really f-ed him up.

Whilst I do sympathise, had he ever got on in a Premier League game the informed comment of the crowd would have made his Dad look like Mary Poppins.

I thought this thread was going to be about everybody being a paedo - again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry no pedophilia angle! With regard to the football crowd, the people playing are adults who actually have a choice as to whether or not they play.

With regard to the other comment. I don't consider myself to be some sort of limp wristed liberal, usually quite the opposite. But I can really see that a lot of parents (even ones who think they are being well meaning) basically just use their kids as extentions of themselves.

As someone who has quite Liberian views it does seem like the kids are in many case being forced into performing in something they don't really want to do. The parents watching makes it a bit like a mini circus.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All adult men are also apparently paedophiles (according to the Daily Mail), so they should be banned on principle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

As someone who has quite Liberian views it does seem like the kids are in many case being forced into performing in something they don't really want to do. The parents watching makes it a bit like a mini circus.

Charles Taylor, is that you? (Sorry, sorry....)

Regarding the parents, you must have seen that bit in the Football Factory where the parents come to blows at the kid's football match and all the kids walk off in despair? Art imitating life, definitely.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry no pedophilia angle! With regard to the football crowd, the people playing are adults who actually have a choice as to whether or not they play.

With regard to the other comment. I don't consider myself to be some sort of limp wristed liberal, usually quite the opposite. But I can really see that a lot of parents (even ones who think they are being well meaning) basically just use their kids as extentions of themselves.

As someone who has quite Liberian views it does seem like the kids are in many case being forced into performing in something they don't really want to do. The parents watching makes it a bit like a mini circus.

Genetically, they are.

The idea of banning parents from Schools Sports Days because they 'put pressure on children' is utterly pathetic.

If you can't see that one purpose of the education system is to prepare children for life, then I hope you don't have children. Seriously.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a parent, I'd be happy if I never had to go anywhere near another school sports day. The idea that I should be banned from doing so though is abhorrent. There's a certain brand of extreme feminism running through a chunk of the teaching profession that jumps on any vague possible excuse for removing men from the lives of children, this is just another example.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Genetically, they are.

The idea of banning parents from Schools Sports Days because they 'put pressure on children' is utterly pathetic.

If you can't see that one purpose of the education system is to prepare children for life, then I hope you don't have children. Seriously.

I get the general feeling it's about deliberately not preparing them for real life. That way when it hits, they instinctively fall back on the state to help them out. It's all about producing an obedient generation of willing little clients of the state. Authoritarians across the political divide love it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the opposite.

Parents should be forced to compete as well.

Rich fat parents should be able to hire proxys to compete on their behalf, and buy access to the drinking/smoking tent.

The schools could also run a book, gaining much needed revenue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the opposite.

Parents should be forced to compete as well.

Rich fat parents should be able to hire proxys to compete on their behalf, and buy access to the drinking/smoking tent.

The schools could also run a book, gaining much needed revenue.

Haha, that would be really funny. With my son's current school I'd be utterly fecked given how loaded some of the parents seem to be.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I may seem a bit of a nutter for saying that, and it doesn't really go along with ideas generally expressed on this site.

But the experiences of my friend, the film documentary “Hoop Dreams” (one of my favourite films), and the book “Friday Night Lights” (not the film, as that glosses over the dark side of American High School sports), really show me that competitive sports in front of a group of parents who are just seeing their kids as an extension of themselves can be corrosive.

I do realise that school needs to prepare children for adult life, but I am trying to highlight that the problem often lies with the parents in the audience.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know I may seem a bit of a nutter for saying that, and it doesn't really go along with ideas generally expressed on this site.

But the experiences of my friend, the film documentary “Hoop Dreams” (one of my favourite films), and the book “Friday Night Lights” (not the film, as that glosses over the dark side of American High School sports), really show me that competitive sports in front of a group of parents who are just seeing their kids as an extension of themselves can be corrosive.

I do realise that school needs to prepare children for adult life, but I am trying to highlight that the problem often lies with the parents in the audience.

Surprisingly enough most parents are real people. And make mistakes. Some push their kids too hard, others not enough. There are probably a whole load of other areas in which parents fail to exercise textbook parenting in. And the solution is ..... ?

Where does this stop ? At the school sports day, or at any activity the kid may be involved in outside of school, like football clubs, gymnastics, scouts or air cadets ? And what about academic work ? Surely there are parents who push their kids too hard at that as well ?

Maybe it would be better if the kids were taken away from these inadequate parents ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe they could combine the paedo angle with the sports day ?

Get all the men to wear jimmy saville masks and chase the kids around ?

The winning child is the last one to get caught.

The rest have to spend a week in the lair of the local paedo dungeon.

Everyone is a winner. And all the blokes can then be locked up for being dirty animals that are a danger to children.

We could even get it sponsored by the Daily Mail.

A bit like its a knock out. In fact lets get Stuart Hall to commente !!

Fabulous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a parent, I'd be happy if I never had to go anywhere near another school sports day. The idea that I should be banned from doing so though is abhorrent. There's a certain brand of extreme feminism running through a chunk of the teaching profession that jumps on any vague possible excuse for removing men from the lives of children, this is just another example.

As a teenager I was taught at a very conservative and extremely competitive all boys Grammar school which most definitely was not run by feminists. It was dedicated to giving its pupils the best preparation to help them survive as individuals in outside world. However, I seem to remember that parents who tried to involve themselves too closely in any of the schools activities be it educational or sporting were told politely to 'f*ck off'. Parents were welcome to attend Speech Day, Open Evenings or to volunteer as governors. Otherwise they were expected to keep their noses out of the schools business. I seem remember to my old Dad finding this a great relief as they did not impose on him like my brothers secondary school.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just ban fathers from Sports days. That would leave the mothers, who are paragons of virtue, to attend. Men are all paedos and so the children will be safer, and not exposed to their father's testosterone, which is corrosive. Finally, it will dawn on them all that the kids aren't in contact with their fathers anyway, so they will all be free to blame their children's failures and foibles on father absenteeism. Win win!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just ban fathers from Sports days. That would leave the mothers, who are paragons of virtue, to attend. Men are all paedos and so the children will be safer, and not exposed to their father's testosterone, which is corrosive. Finally, it will dawn on them all that the kids aren't in contact with their fathers anyway, so they will all be free to blame their children's failures and foibles on father absenteeism. Win win!

I wish they would. My lad's sports day is on Wednesday, and I'm expected to be there to cheer him on when he's racing and be bored shitless the rest of the time. I've got plenty of work this week, and can ill afford the time off. :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.