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Management Jarjon And The Failings Of Labour

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http://www.telegraph.co.uk/health/10134813/Mr-Cameron-made-a-huge-error-when-he-embraced-the-NHS.html?placement=mid1

Reading through the evidence, you keep coming across new mind-boggling facts. You learn that there were, at one time, three Joint Collaborative Reviews of similar things going on. You encounter jargon, such as this from the meeting notes of CQC’s Regional Director, which says “Bulleting to cascade lessons learnt shared across trust has been developed”. And sloppiness: an investigation manager decides not to pursue the story of Joshua Titcombe after he has given himself only an evening to study 13 documents and 95 pages of information. “I do not think the case meets are [sic] criteria for further investigation”, he emails yawningly when he wakes up the following morning.

You gradually understand that the system doesn’t and can’t work. Those employed inside it recognise this. If they are brave people, they complain, and this makes them unpopular. If they are average, not very brave people, they simply do their best to survive, pretending to hit the targets which are themselves pretences. If they are unpleasant people, they grab such power as the system affords – the power to appoint your cronies, secure large pensions, accumulate honours, invent new “training toolkits” for Equality and Diversity etc, and work out how to use their present job to get an even better-paid one.

“Wherever we find failure,” proclaimed the CQC annual report in 2010, the year when it gave the Furness hospital trust (UHMB) the unwarranted all-clear, “we do not hesitate to take appropriate and proportionate action.” The resemblance to communist regimes boasting about their five-year plans as the harvest fails or steel production becomes unsellable is spooky. In the Sir David Nicholson/Cynthia Bower scheme of things, patients play the same role as workers in the old Soviet system – forever invoked, forever oppressed.

Like Politburo members doing well out of the Ukrainian famine, Sir David and Ms Bower rose to even greater power through their triumphs in Mid Staffs where (over a period which extended longer than their own particular terms of office) 1,200 patients died unnecessarily. After the Francis Report into the Mid Staffs scandal appeared, David Cameron made a critical error. Instead of showing Sir David the door, he praised his “grip and grasp” of the NHS. Sir David stayed. Now the great man has finally told us that he is leaving his job as Chief Executive next year, but he departs full of official honours, gripping and grasping a pension pot of £1.9 million.

The Government has not emphasised that the currently disastrous shape of the NHS and its regulatory system is the creation of Labour. The Nicholsons and Bowers are figures of the Blair/Brown era. They are the breed of managerialists who have come up through directing social services, working for trade unions, running local councils, unsullied by any humane education, professional knowledge (hardly any of those who run health are doctors) or experience of business. They have titles and salaries which ape the private sector, but a mindset and a network which are the purest creations of pre-credit-crunch welfarism. Why hasn’t the Coalition, especially its dominant Tory partner, made hay with this?

Having dealt with similar individuals like the above who are full of management bu115h1t spinning out of any orifice it doesn't surprise me that those regulating are in fact totally useless at their jobs and are nothing but incompetent. However if you are incompetent you clearly don't employ competent people you need to employ cronies and sycophants which allows you to strengthen your power base. Good managers recognised their own mediocrity and hire people who are strong in the areas they are weak. These people hire people who are just as weak as they are to ensure even mediocrity isn't achieved.

I bet there are a lot of "learning outcomes" from this mess these types of people seem to love that term.

You certainly can't read 95 pages in an evening and draw a proper conclusion, you need to read it several times and think about what you are reading.

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I meet with your review and can imagine the scenario you infer...but I dont recognise this in the review that we received, as the long grass hid the conclusion.

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The word Collaborative in the title of any official document or project should be warning enough to anyone that it will probably contain high level of bullsh*t, distortion, coverups and even outright lies. Indeed, the term always seems to magically revert to its war time usage as the people who are involved in running such ventures will nearly always be Quislings with totalitarian sympathies. I would go so far to say that we actually live in a 'Managerialist' rather than a Capitalist or a Socialist society since everything seems designed to support, protect and promote that class be it in banking or the health service. Although they are supposedly in charge they mysteriously never seem to be held responsible when things go wrong and never suffer any financial or career consequences from their failures.

Edited by stormymonday_2011

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I would go so far to say that we actually live in a 'Managerialist' rather than a Capitalist or a Socialist society since everything seems designed to support, protect and promote that class be it in banking or the health service. Although they are supposedly in charge they mysteriously never seem to be held responsible when things go wrong and never suffer any financial or career consequences from their failures.

A point that seems to be totally missed by the "public bad, private good" and the "public good, private bad" brigades.

Managerialism is a virus that has been gradually infecting both sectors for some years now. I fear it's terminal.

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It is pretty obvious that the managers have seized control of the government. In the days of strong leaders like Atlee or Churchill, when orders were given, the bureaucrats largely carried out those orders(sure they were also trying to empire build but it was risky). Today when the modern political leaders give the bureaucracy orders, the managers just laugh in their face.

The corporations are the same. The widely held public corporation model has failed, because no shareholder had enough power to control the managers. So today even the boards of directors have managers from other corporations. They don't even pretend to represent the shareholders. So you see 100% of the profit of the corporation goes to bonuses and salaries to the managers. -The idiocy of the banks giving record bonuses while reporting quarterly losses.

It is not an easy thing to fix, because the managerial class works like a collective to protect each other. Like when managers bankrupted many of our public corporations, managers in the government bailed them out. People are good at 'sensing' when something might threaten their position and moving aggressively to quash it.

Perfect example of their collaboration. The regulated monopoly utilities have regulators which approve or disapprove rate hikes. Well the utilities are always giving generous pay increases to managers and hiring additional managers. So one might think the regulator would step in and say we are not approving a rate hike as we find those unnecessary. Yet the regulator is itself full of managers who are getting generous pay increases and approves the rate hike.

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The word Collaborative in the title of any official document or project should be warning enough to anyone that it will probably contain high level of bullsh*t, distortion, coverups and even outright lies. Indeed, the term always seems to magically revert to its war time usage as the people who are involved in running such ventures will nearly always be Quislings with totalitarian sympathies. I would go so far to say that we actually live in a 'Managerialist' rather than a Capitalist or a Socialist society since everything seems designed to support, protect and promote that class be it in banking or the health service. Although they are supposedly in charge they mysteriously never seem to be held responsible when things go wrong and never suffer any financial or career consequences from their failures.

The responsibility is a tell-tale sign. Obviously if an auto or steel company is failing, responsibility must lie at the top. But today we blame the bottom, the workers for the failures.

When I worked in banking there was a unified code among the managers to never blame each other for any failure. Targets were missed, because staff were not properly cross-selling products to customers. Large losses on loans, were because frontline staff did not perform proper due-diligence.

Managers who consistently missed targets.. were promoted - because after all it was not their fault. From the perspective of staff, the dream was to ascend into the management.

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A number of years back, Intel's board of directors brought in external management consultants, to provide justification for cuts they wanted to make.

After many months of research, the consultants came back and said yes, you can cut staff by 10% without effecting anything.

Great said the management... Which factories do we close?

None said the consultants, just get rid of these 3 levels of management. So they did, and no one could tell the difference.

100% true story.

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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