Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

The Eagle

Zsw Engineers Build Lithium-Ion Battery Able To Last For 27 Years

Recommended Posts

(Phys.org) —Officials at Germany's Centre for Solar Energy and Hydrogen Research Baden-Württemberg, (ZSW) have issued a press release describing improvements they've made to lithium-ion batteries. They claim their improvements allow a single battery to be recharged up to 10,000 times while still retaining 85 percent of its charging capacity. Such a battery, if used in an electric car, they note, would allow its owner to recharge the battery every day for 27.4 years.

Besides the initial high cost of car batteries for electric vehicles, one of the main factors preventing further adoption of electric vehicles is the knowledge that the batteries will need to be replaced after just eight to ten years of use (and in some cases as few as just 3). Batteries that could last 25 or 30 years would likely outlive many of the other cars' parts, or the car itself, and if not too expensive, could finally give car buyers a compelling reason to switch from those that still rely on gasoline.

ZSW's announcement doesn't come as a surprise to most in the auto industry—the company published a paper in Journal of Power Sources last year describing ongoing research into electrode manufacturing process improvements that they claimed could dramatically improve the longevity of lithium-ion batteries. They noted then that electrode thickness changes, how much the electrodes compact during use and the type of conducting agent used in their construction when engineered in a new way, could help such batteries endure more recharging.

The newly redesigned batteries have approximately four times the density of current batteries (1,100 Watts per kilogram) and have been designed for use in storing power created by wind and solar farms and also in automotive vehicles.

http://phys.org/news/2013-06-zsw-lithium-ion-battery-years.html

Looks like we are getting somewhere with the key component that still holds back electric cars!

10000 recharges and 4 times the power density, I'm surprised this didn't make headlines in the MSM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are a lot of companies out there working on lithium batteries. A few that I know of are working on nanotechnology to engineer the components to improve the capacity or lifetime. Breakthroughs are released all the time, but me suspects that a lot of them are orientated toward getting further investment for the business. Most of the tech improvements seem good but when you dig a little deeper are some wAy away from commercial production.

I think that improvents will be made sooner or later, but it is hard to know which of the many companies involved will produce the commercially viable solution.

I don't think this will be suppressed by big oil for 2 reasons, one is that there are too many businesses out there doing it and the second is that I don't believe there will be a huge breakthrough, just lots of small ones over time.

Let's keep our fingers crossed they get there - and hopefully the same wi happen with solar.

http://phys.org/news/2013-06-zsw-lithium-ion-battery-years.html

Looks like we are getting somewhere with the key component that still holds back electric cars!

10000 recharges and 4 times the power density, I'm surprised this didn't make headlines in the MSM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are a lot of companies out there working on lithium batteries. A few that I know of are working on nanotechnology to engineer the components to improve the capacity or lifetime. Breakthroughs are released all the time, but me suspects that a lot of them are orientated toward getting further investment for the business. Most of the tech improvements seem good but when you dig a little deeper are some wAy away from commercial production.

I think that improvents will be made sooner or later, but it is hard to know which of the many companies involved will produce the commercially viable solution.

I don't think this will be suppressed by big oil for 2 reasons, one is that there are too many businesses out there doing it and the second is that I don't believe there will be a huge breakthrough, just lots of small ones over time.

Let's keep our fingers crossed they get there - and hopefully the same wi happen with solar.

I often wonder about the everlasting light bulb? amazing it hasn't been invented yet?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Germany is certainly likely to produce many of the technological breakthroughs required to make proper use of renewable energies. They seem to be putting an enormous amount of effort into it; half of my translation work nowadays seems to be associated with research into such things as novel batteries, solar cells, inverters and intelligent energy management systems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are a lot of companies out there working on lithium batteries. A few that I know of are working on nanotechnology to engineer the components to improve the capacity or lifetime. Breakthroughs are released all the time, but me suspects that a lot of them are orientated toward getting further investment for the business. Most of the tech improvements seem good but when you dig a little deeper are some wAy away from commercial production.

I think that improvents will be made sooner or later, but it is hard to know which of the many companies involved will produce the commercially viable solution.

I don't think this will be suppressed by big oil for 2 reasons, one is that there are too many businesses out there doing it and the second is that I don't believe there will be a huge breakthrough, just lots of small ones over time.

Let's keep our fingers crossed they get there - and hopefully the same wi happen with solar.

We shouldn't just keep our fingers crossed. What's up with you youngsters? We need some sort of people power to help these firms succeed in the face of oil power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rechargeable batteries...complete waste of effort. I mean, who can ever find them again once use, to be recharged?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

rechargeable batteries...complete waste of effort. I mean, who can ever find them again once use, to be recharged?

Are you experiencing a bad hangover? :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a 1 kilo battery like this and a lightweight designed electric hub and bicycle would make travelling around towns and cities so much easier, with an increase in legal speed limits to say 25mph. Could get a 50 mile round trip just on the battery power alone.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If these batteries have a life of 27 years they will outlive most of the cars they are installed in. Thereafter they can be salvaged and reused as as storage capacity to support electricity grids.

GM already have a scheme to do this with GM Volt batteries. As a stationary unit power to weight ratios are not that important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://phys.org/news...tery-years.html

Looks like we are getting somewhere with the key component that still holds back electric cars!

10000 recharges and 4 times the power density, I'm surprised this didn't make headlines in the MSM.

The key component that holds back electric cars is the energy source.

In the UK we need to quickly build half a dozen or so nuclear power stations and then we'll be motoring.

Germany are crazy dumping theirs to support their windmill industry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bound to die a death and be buried by the oil cartels.

Bear in mind that the car companies are probably quite concerned about people not buying cars because of the cost of oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Germany is certainly likely to produce many of the technological breakthroughs required to make proper use of renewable energies. They seem to be putting an enormous amount of effort into it; half of my translation work nowadays seems to be associated with research into such things as novel batteries, solar cells, inverters and intelligent energy management systems.

Yes, but who's going to be the leader at selling overpriced and useless insurance-type add-ons to go with them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If these batteries have a life of 27 years they will outlive most of the cars they are installed in. Thereafter they can be salvaged and reused as as storage capacity to support electricity grids.

GM already have a scheme to do this with GM Volt batteries. As a stationary unit power to weight ratios are not that important.

Yes, the day an electric car comes out with a battery with 20-30 Kwh capacity and 27-year life, I'll be interested, because when the car is finished it can be used to power my house combined with a PV array and a backup generator.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The quote "1,100 Watts per kilogram" makes me somewhat suspicious. Not much use if it can only deliver that much power for a second or two. What's the energy density like as well as the power density?

As someone said above large breakthroughs rarely happen so be suspicious of anything that claims to be one. The technology we've got now looks vastly different to a century ago but there haven't been too many sudden changes in that time, even with a couple of very large wars spurring on what were at the time fairly immature technologies.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The key component that holds back electric cars is the energy source.

In the UK we need to quickly build half a dozen or so nuclear power stations and then we'll be motoring.

Germany are crazy dumping theirs to support their windmill industry.

Do you have a VI or something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.