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Yes but the 1% need 95% of our land as their hunting grounds, surely you don't want to deprive them of their pleasures?! :rolleyes:

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Strange that we were told we need planning laws to stop the countryside being concreted over when modern estates are a sea of grey and red with artificial patches of turf if you're lucky.

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No doubt there are social scientists who regard the 'then' picture as a dystopia suburban hell of conformity and boredom. Sadly the 'now' picture shows just how badly things have gone wrong.

fecking shocking

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It's funny since the 1980s how living in a council house has gone from being looked down upon, to being envied. I personally want to live in a 3bed council house, they have decent sized rooms and a decent sized garden.

There is a small pocket of council houses near me, I wouldn't mind living in. Quiet a few have been sold. Keeping my eye on that area for the future.

And in London private tenants are paying £200-250 a week for living in "ex local authority."

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selling council houses to tenants always seemed somehow wrong.

sort of like selling off fire hydrants....now not available to those that need them.

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It's the plonking the front door right on the road bit that worries me. The front garden is virtually extinct on new builds.

Estates used to mature and become leafy. Cant really have leafy with no front gardens.

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Once they used to build homes on roads that led to somewhere.....now they chuck lots of boxes on a patch of land that goes nowhere. ;)

does stop rat runs ........but I would hate to live on the entrance road

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I believe 3% of Britain is covered by urban areas, 47% is forest/undeveloped land, and 50% is farms.

One might argue this manifestation in your now picture is the ideal. Each family in that neighbourhood gets their own house with a little bit of outside area under their ownership. With this land ownership they get to set the rules on their little oasis.

To further this line of thought, this tightly packed suburb seems to provide the maximum profit to land developers. I can only imagine what those would sell for if remotely close to London.

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Estates used to mature and become leafy. Cant really have leafy with no front gardens.

Oh yes, so they did:

Easterhouse-008.jpg

I studied Glasgow housing estates when I was at school, they've had/have big social problems.

The root of the issue is the fact that they threw up all these shoddy poor quality homes in estates around what was a dying economic center. People were relocated there from the city of Glasgow. The estates had no services, no community focal points, no buses, the residents were poor and had no cars. Communities were split up and moved into these estates, the people locked away not knowing their neighbours. The whole thing was a complete disaster.

Role on 50 years and we now get these:

Ashmead_Housing_Estate_-_geograph.org.uk_-_174263.jpg

Where the developers throw up shoddy homes in estates around dying economic centers ( although I an not implying the particular houses in the photo are shoddy or have been built badly). People freely re-locate to these red brick islands taking on massive debt as they do so. The estates I have seen round Northampton have little of no community focal points, the residents are forced into their cars to go anywhere. With the rising cost of living where you have to drive everywhere many will be stranded at home. Families are split up as young people have to move to get jobs and move into these estate. Worst still these estates have been mixed some of the haves with many of the have nots.

I've always said that these modern housing estates can become slums of the future. Time will tell.

Edited by TheCountOfNowhere

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The estates I have seen round Northampton have little of no community focal points, the residents are forced into their cars to go anywhere.

The irony is that modern planners are anti car and go out of their way to minimise parking provision.

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The irony is that modern planners are anti car and go out of their way to minimise parking provision.

So that they can squeeze in more houses on the land....roads and pavements on the estates are very narrow now as well ;)

Edited by winkie

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The irony is that modern planners are anti car and go out of their way to minimise parking provision.

The planners might be but I am absolutely certain the government has decreed that houses should be build miles from anyone so people MUST use a car...therefore paying more TAX on fuel.

20% income tax is a myth.

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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