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Want A Cheap Extension Attach A 26Ft Caravan To Your House

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2341057/Neighbours-fury-family-attach-26ft-mobile-caravan-home-cheap-extension.html

article-2341057-1A4D4B67000005DC-916_634x425.jpg

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Another neighbour, Jonathan Goodsell, has been a vocal critic of the extension, demanding its immediate removal.

He posted on the council’s website that the caravan has had ‘a profound effect on the neighbourhood,’ lowering the tone of the area and reducing house values.

..

Mrs Sanders said that as well as paying £4,000 for the caravan, they spent a further £3,000 having the double glazing installed.

The family said that the total cost was still much less than the £28,000 they were quoted for an extension.

From the story it appears they are looking after a relative and needed extra room.

A genius move to cut costs.

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From the story it appears they are looking after a relative and needed extra room.

A genius move to cut costs.

But it looks like it was such an upmarket area to begin with..

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From the story it appears they are looking after a relative and needed extra room.

A genius move to cut costs.

I notice a small official looking note attached to a pole........did they say what they expected to receive to rent? ;)

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Oh man that is ugly. Poor neighbours.

You could always hang some hanging baskets around it.....saves having to cut the lawn and do the weeding. ;)

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Big in proportion to the house..... even though the house looks like a 3 bed .........A newbuild would even be smaller and not even have the garden to accommodate it ......

Static caravans may soon be deemed upwardly mobile and a step up in size from a new 2 bed redrow/barret/taylorwinpy box .....

depressing

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Oh man that is ugly. Poor neighbours.

Nothing some trellis and a bit of fencing can't fix (which, if it was me, I'd do for my own sake as well as the neighbours).

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Nothing some trellis and a bit of fencing can't fix (which, if it was me, I'd do for my own sake as well as the neighbours).

Wonder what it's like having a pikey neighbour? Well, there it is.

The snow fence really tops it off... Looks like hell.

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Wonder what it's like having a pikey neighbour? Well, there it is.

The snow fence really tops it off... Looks like hell.

its not a pikey van....there is no horse.

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I would have built a wall around the garden up to the maximum height I could without planning. 6 foot I think.

I would then affix trellis to it and grow fast moving stuff like ivy to act as a screen. Once of the required consistency and height I would hire a crane to drop it in in the dead of night surreptitiously like the bloke who cut that tree down in Poole.

If the neighbours cant see it then it it significantly devalues their whinge factor........

In any event as I understand it there is no law against putting a caravan in your garden. The tricky bits come if you attach it to the main residence and attach services.

Slowly Slowly catchee Monkey.....

Perhaps they should have come up with a plan.

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The caravan in this case may be legal. It is separate from the house and its use could be considered incidental as a granny annex rather than a new dwelling.

It may be covered by GPDO part 5 or permitted development laws and not need planning permission. The planners seems to have little understanding of this law (as do I, it's a very boring read).

I have used permitted development to put a 50sqm building right up against my house (but not touching). The planners didn't like it, I had to go through their legal department instead and I have the CLOPUD to show it's legal.

Pic below to show how the outbuilding doesn't actually touch the (extended) house.

2013-05-31095259_zps67f1a535.jpg

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Wonder what it's like having a pikey neighbour? Well, there it is.

The snow fence really tops it off... Looks like hell.

Paint it brown, a fence like colour even has the slatted ridges for authenticity, serves a duel purpose....no one would be none the wiser. ;)

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In any event as I understand it there is no law against putting a caravan in your garden. The tricky bits come if you attach it to the main residence and attach services.

Indeed if it is a temporary parking arrangement. However, when it comes to a static you are either creating a new dwelling or an extension if attached. And we can't allow new household formation for peanuts, think of the effect on house prices. ;)

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The caravan in this case may be legal. It is separate from the house and its use could be considered incidental as a granny annex rather than a new dwelling.

It may be covered by GPDO part 5 or permitted development laws and not need planning permission. The planners seems to have little understanding of this law (as do I, it's a very boring read).

I have used permitted development to put a 50sqm building right up against my house (but not touching). The planners didn't like it, I had to go through their legal department instead and I have the CLOPUD to show it's legal.

Pic below to show how the outbuilding doesn't actually touch the (extended) house.

2013-05-31095259_zps67f1a535.jpg

I'm intrigued by this.

What are the limits regarding the function of this building? Is it allowed to have electrics, a kitchen, bathroom and toilet etc?

Would you always get away with this, anywhere in the UK?

You could conceivably have put a full basement in the new building and had 100sqm of useable space!

.

Edited by swissy_fit

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I'm intrigued by this.

What are the limits regarding the function of this building? Is it allowed to have electrics, a kitchen, bathroom and toilet etc?

The key thing is that its use must be "incidental" to the main house. The meaning of that is a bit vague though.

It can't be capable of being an independent dwelling so you can't have a full set of kitchen/bedroom/bathroom/toilet. A class E outbuilding must not join the house. It's not clear what subset you can have. e.g. Shower is OK if you have a gym. Bedroom/Bathroom is OK for guests/granny if she cooks/eats in the main house. The outbuilding must be sized for its intended purpose but can have as much floor area as the whole house. The minimum gap has been shown to be 1" in appeals.

Mine is just one large room, all the electrics, radiator heating to better than modern building regs. It will be used to house some pianos and a home cinema (qualifies as "incidental use" under class E). I can later apply for permission for change of use, much easier than applying for a new building since there is no physical change to object to. I may be able to use the class D rules to join the buildings together later, less than 3m2 would be sufficient.

> Would you always get away with this, anywhere in the UK?

Interesting phrase, "Get away with this". This is not a planning loophole, it is a law! It was created to free up the planning system. Very few people seem to make use of it, many still apply for full planning permission when they don't have to. A CLOPUD application (legal permission rather than planning permission) is half the price and a lot quicker to get (got mine in <3 weeks) after fighting planners for 2 years.

Permitted development doesn't have to meet the sight line rules that planners use. The neighbours, planners or anybody else cannot object. No fussy planners telling you which materials to use.

They may be further restrictions for conservation areas and "Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty" but I didn't spend any time looking at that as it didn't apply to me.

You can't have a basement, it has to be single storey. You can have very deep foundations though which could be subsequently converted to a basement. One neighbour has done this.

Edited by VeryMeanReversion

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The key thing is that its use must be "incidental" to the main house. The meaning of that is a bit vague though.

It can't be capable of being an independent dwelling so you can't have a full set of kitchen/bedroom/bathroom/toilet. A class E outbuilding must not join the house. It's not clear what subset you can have. e.g. Shower is OK if you have a gym. Bedroom/Bathroom is OK for guests/granny if she cooks/eats in the main house. The outbuilding must be sized for its intended purpose but can have as much floor area as the whole house. The minimum gap has been shown to be 1" in appeals.

Mine is just one large room, all the electrics, radiator heating to better than modern building regs. It will be used to house some pianos and a home cinema (qualifies as "incidental use" under class E). I can later apply for permission for change of use, much easier than applying for a new building since there is no physical change to object to. I may be able to use the class D rules to join the buildings together later, less than 3m2 would be sufficient.

> Would you always get away with this, anywhere in the UK?

Interesting phrase, "Get away with this". This is not a planning loophole, it is a law! It was created to free up the planning system. Very few people seem to make use of it, many still apply for full planning permission when they don't have to. A CLOPUD application (legal permission rather than planning permission) is half the price and a lot quicker to get (got mine in <3 weeks) after fighting planners for 2 years.

Permitted development doesn't have to meet the sight line rules that planners use. The neighbours, planners or anybody else cannot object. No fussy planners telling you which materials to use.

They may be further restrictions for conservation areas and "Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty" but I didn't spend any time looking at that as it didn't apply to me.

You can't have a basement, it has to be single storey. You can have very deep foundations though which could be subsequently converted to a basement. One neighbour has done this.

Very interesting, thanks.

How many class E outbuildings can you have? :)

If you put all the plumbing and electrics in for a kitchen as well as a shower/toilet in your "gym" , but covered up, would that get noticed at planning inspections?

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Very interesting, thanks.

How many class E outbuildings can you have? :)

If you put all the plumbing and electrics in for a kitchen as well as a shower/toilet in your "gym" , but covered up, would that get noticed at planning inspections?

Number of class E outbuilding is limited only by the number of incidental uses you can justify. I have a 60sqm barn which I'm about to double in size next. This one is obviously an outbuilding, well away from the house so I wont bother with the CLOPUD.

The planners won't come and look at the building unless someone complains. You may be thinking of building inspectors, they deal with building regs rather than planning. I use a private one rather than the normal council one.

I would expect the building inspector would notice extra plumbing/wiring and ensure it meets regulations before issuing a certificate. They don't care about planning permission, permitted development etc. You could get an electrician to sign off the electrics and the inspector would accept that.

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I'm intrigued by this.

What are the limits regarding the function of this building? Is it allowed to have electrics, a kitchen, bathroom and toilet etc?

Would you always get away with this, anywhere in the UK?

You could conceivably have put a full basement in the new building and had 100sqm of useable space!

.

This got me thinking about the 'mole man' that excavated hundreds of tonnes of earth under his home to extend space..... it was later condemned....... but what if somebody did this and actually provided proper structural support for the above.... could someone get away with building an extension underground without being detected? It would probably work out cheaper to move house though lol!

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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