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Frank Hovis

Tipping

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Tipping is probbaly my biggest bugbear in the US albeit a minor annoyance here. IME it is caused by managers underpaying their staff so you the customer are then expected to pay their wages for them.

I've not worked in a job where I get tips so all it's ever been for me is an additional levy and as a consequence I will tend to avoid places where tipping is the norm, for example I avoided taking cabs in London (it's amazing how close everything is, I walked City - West End and back again many times).

Sounds like the US is finally beginning to improve a bit:

In the restaurant business, which accounts for about two-thirds of all tips paid in the US, there are signs of change.

Receipt

Since last week, staff at Sushi Yasuda in New York have no need to worry about the generosity or tightfistedness of their customers.

Owner Scott Rosenberg has banned tipping, saying his staff already get a good wage, with benefits. He told The Price Hike he wants to improve the dining experience by eliminating the "math equation" from the end-of-meal ritual.

Other upmarket American restaurants have introduced an optional service charge of 15-20% instead of a tip. This is a common practice in the UK, usually between 10-15%.

This is a big issue in the hospitality industry now, says Dublanica, who adds he would support a service charge divided between employees if it helped to provide a proper wage and benefits such as sick pay. But he can't see it catching on.

"Even though the quality of service doesn't affect tipping, Americans are under the illusion they are tipping on service and like the illusion of being able to reward. They don't want to have that option taken away from them."

To tip or not to tip... or should it be banned?

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Tipping is probbaly my biggest bugbear in the US albeit a minor annoyance here. IME it is caused by managers underpaying their staff so you the customer are then expected to pay their wages for them.

I've not worked in a job where I get tips so all it's ever been for me is an additional levy and as a consequence I will tend to avoid places where tipping is the norm, for example I avoided taking cabs in London (it's amazing how close everything is, I walked City - West End and back again many times).

Sounds like the US is finally beginning to improve a bit:

To tip or not to tip... or should it be banned?

Never really understood tipping, either do your job properly or not at all.

In the US it is a little different as I do feel service is much better, which I suspect is driven by the tipping culture.

Also never really understood the percentage bit, I suppose under normal circumstances most meals will generally be the same, however I was in a pretty good restaurant last weekend, the wine was not cheap (as always you keep an eye out for the most expensive which topped £6k). We only went for a glass or two of something each so about £18, however I'm sure many people* buy a £100+ bottle. With a percentage in my case the waiter gets £1.80, in the other £10 both for carrying a glass bottle full of liquid.

Also odd how some professions get a tip and some don't.

* in the context of that level of restaurant, I'm sure spending £100+ on a bottle of wine will be met with derision here.

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I like tipping. Some time ago a Yank explained it to me.

10% bad service, 15% average, 20% good. At least if the service is crap you get to vote with your wallet. And if you don't want to partake, just add 15% to every meal.

Edit : It can't be that hard - remember the US is probably the most dumbed down culture in the world and they figure it out.

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Guest eight

With a percentage in my case the waiter gets £1.80, in the other £10 both for carrying a glass bottle full of liquid.

I know a waiter who made £30K in tips in just a couple of years and that was here in Darlington. He was an exceptional guy though, Eastern European, a real raconteur. I suspect he was one of those people who would have excelled at whatever he turned his hand to really.

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I know a waiter who made £30K in tips in just a couple of years and that was here in Darlington. He was an exceptional guy though, Eastern European, a real raconteur. I suspect he was one of those people who would have excelled at whatever he turned his hand to really.

I worked nights in a restaurant in London in the late 80s. The girls who worked as waitresses reckoned to get about thirty quid a night in tips. They did say that they had to work at it, to use their personalities.

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I like tipping. Some time ago a Yank explained it to me.

10% bad service, 15% average, 20% good. At least if the service is crap you get to vote with your wallet. And if you don't want to partake, just add 15% to every meal.

Edit : It can't be that hard - remember the US is probably the most dumbed down culture in the world and they figure it out.

It's not a question of it being hard to understand in a how do you do it sense, it's whats the point of it.

Especially in light of your Yank mate who tips for poor service? It's more acceptable in the US as eating out is cheaper, over here it's already factored in to the price of the food or added on as a service charge.

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I know a waiter who made £30K in tips in just a couple of years and that was here in Darlington. He was an exceptional guy though, Eastern European, a real raconteur. I suspect he was one of those people who would have excelled at whatever he turned his hand to really.

To be fair I was talking more about a service charge i.e. a forced tip, but same thing generally applies if you are basing tips on the cost of the meal.

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To be fair I was talking more about a service charge i.e. a forced tip, but same thing generally applies if you are basing tips on the cost of the meal.

There must be a financial avoidance reason why they don't just incorporate it in the price of the meal and pay their staff a better wage.......one thing going for it it makes the price of the food look cheaper than in other places. ;)

Edit to say.....why does this thread make me think of expenses and allowances.....salary tax free top-ups? :unsure:

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I like tipping. Some time ago a Yank explained it to me.

10% bad service, 15% average, 20% good. At least if the service is crap you get to vote with your wallet. And if you don't want to partake, just add 15% to every meal.

Edit : It can't be that hard - remember the US is probably the most dumbed down culture in the world and they figure it out.

It's the 10% = bad service that takes some adjusting to. Here bad service = 0% and 10% would be quite a decent tip.

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I hate tipping and think that it should be stamped out as a thing that happens routinely. When it reaches the level of being expected to make up someone's wages it's become absurd. It's the employer's role to pay their staff. Expecting 10% even if it's bad? Ridiculous.

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for example I avoided taking cabs in London

Since when do you have to tip cabbies? I have never tipped them, they all earn more than enough.

The only place where I tip is at restaurants and only if the service has been great.

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It's the 10% = bad service that takes some adjusting to. Here bad service = 0% and 10% would be quite a decent tip.

Yep bad service equals nothing. Where is the incentive to improve if you still get 10%, do these people think they are bankers?

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I like tipping. Some time ago a Yank explained it to me.

10% bad service, 15% average, 20% good. At least if the service is crap you get to vote with your wallet. And if you don't want to partake, just add 15% to every meal.

Edit : It can't be that hard - remember the US is probably the most dumbed down culture in the world and they figure it out.

I don't have a problem with the level of tipping in the US so much as the extent of tipping. It's not just waiters and taxi drivers; it seems that a tip is expected for just about any service rendered: pizza deliverers, cloakroom attendants, bag loaders at supermarkets, etc, etc. Do Americans carry a wad of $1 bills around with them specially for this purpose?

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I don't have a problem with the level of tipping in the US so much as the extent of tipping. It's not just waiters and taxi drivers; it seems that a tip is expected for just about any service rendered: pizza deliverers, cloakroom attendants, bag loaders at supermarkets, etc, etc. Do Americans carry a wad of $1 bills around with them specially for this purpose?

Probably not so bad in the States but in say China/India yes, it is worthwhile keeping a stash of low denomination notes to hand out like confetti. The crowd move in the direction of the notes and you move in the other.

It's hard to please people all of the time. For example at first when I used to go to these places I used to get annoyed at having to fight people carrying your bags everywhere. Then you realise its cheap as chips and I personally would rather give someone something to carry the bags than be hassled by even more beggars in the streets. At least the person is doing something for their money. It's really not worth getting your blood pressure elevated for.

Then I've had some staff do some really useful stuff for me in a hotel in Tokyo before, but they refused to take any tip in return, despite me trying hard.

IMO it's probably only people who don't travel that much and the super tight who beat themselves up over whether they could have saved 25p or so by not getting that guy to carry their bags that make a big deal out of it.

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I don't have a problem with the level of tipping in the US so much as the extent of tipping. It's not just waiters and taxi drivers; it seems that a tip is expected for just about any service rendered: pizza deliverers, cloakroom attendants, bag loaders at supermarkets, etc, etc. Do Americans carry a wad of $1 bills around with them specially for this purpose?

Yes.

One of the things I was told before going to the US for the first time was get a stack of $1 bills when you change your money as you will need it for tips. Absolutely right and I do this every time.

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Just consider it part of the cost of the meal.

If you regularly visit particular restaurants, it is a way of ensuring good service. or insuring against them spitting in your soup.

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The reason for barmen getting tips is because they get paid literally no wage.

My pals worked in bar in Chicago and got a nominal wage that was only for tax/legal reasons.

All their income was from tips. It does create a bad culture as they expect a tip no matter what service they provide. If you don't want to tip you shouldn't have to. If they have an issue with it they should take it up with their boss - they are the one paying them nothing afterall.

Once in a bar in the US i was refused service as i chose not to tip.

The worst occasion was when i offered a dollar tip - clearly wasn't enough - so the guy picked it and literally threw it at me.

Outrageous.

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Yes.

One of the things I was told before going to the US for the first time was get a stack of $1 bills when you change your money as you will need it for tips. Absolutely right and I do this every time.

The money exchange places are not very helpful for this! I usually end up somewhere foreign with large denomination notes! Then I buy a coffee at the airport, with an annoyingly large note! Hey presto! Change! ;)

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Yes.

One of the things I was told before going to the US for the first time was get a stack of $1 bills when you change your money as you will need it for tips. Absolutely right and I do this every time.

Thanks for that, Frank! I've only been to the US a couple of times (and that was quite a while ago) and felt rather baffled when it came to tipping. I'll probably be back there again before long, and I'll make sure I get my pile of $1 bills this time!

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Thanks for that, Frank! I've only been to the US a couple of times (and that was quite a while ago) and felt rather baffled when it came to tipping. I'll probably be back there again before long, and I'll make sure I get my pile of $1 bills this time!

Only twice been to USA! They probably won't let me in again! :(

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I noticed that in most bars and resteraunts in the US they're sharp enough to give you plenty of $1 bills in your change, so that you've got change for the tip.

A friend once told me that if you get bad service a small tip is better than no tip. His logic was that if you don't tip, they just think you're a ***** that doesn't tip. If you give a dirisory tip, you're giving them the clear message that you thought their service wasn't worth much, and they need to do better.

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I noticed that in most bars and resteraunts in the US they're sharp enough to give you plenty of $1 bills in your change, so that you've got change for the tip.

A friend once told me that if you get bad service a small tip is better than no tip. His logic was that if you don't tip, they just think you're a ***** that doesn't tip. If you give a dirisory tip, you're giving them the clear message that you thought their service wasn't worth much, and they need to do better.

So what if you are just passing through and will never use or enter the premisses again.....service is poor you leave no tip, what can they do about it?......different to if you regularly use the restaurant, bar or whatever because it is good, you always leave a tip because you know it to be good, that is why you go there. ;)

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So what if you are just passing through and will never use or enter the premisses again.....service is poor you leave no tip, what can they do about it?

In those circumstances it's no skin off your nose either way, but leaving a small tip gives your server a clearer information signal than no tip. In a tipping cullture like the US even somebody just passing through would still tip as it's an ingrained social norm. No tip means they can write you off as a miser, a small tip sends the message that their service wasn't good enough, and can actualy be taken (and sometimes intended) as an insult. Like the way the barman seems to have taken CCC's tip in his anecdote above.

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In those circumstances it's no skin off your nose either way, but leaving a small tip gives your server a clearer information signal than no tip. In a tipping cullture like the US even somebody just passing through would still tip as it's an ingrained social norm. No tip means they can write you off as a miser, a small tip sends the message that their service wasn't good enough, and can actualy be taken (and sometimes intended) as an insult. Like the way the barman seems to have taken CCC's tip in his anecdote above.

Some people would prefer not to be part of the 'ingrained social norm' or care that they are thought of as a miser or care what they are thought of by someone that doesn't matter....that's their problem (their thoughts) not anyone elses. ;)

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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