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Estate Agent Fees

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So been thinking about moving would prefer to buy but still to expensive

Anyway been forwarded some properties via estate agent and in the .pdf is terms small print crap

Sitting here working out extra fees and cant help but laugh last time i moved i paid months rent deposit and £95 reference check

Tenancy Agreement

Before any tenancy begins you will sign a Tenancy Agreement

setting out the landlord’s and tenant’s obligations. A charge of

£180 is made for the preparation of the original Agreement and a

further £125 for any extension Agreement(s) subsequently

entered into.

When do you sign and what do you pay?

Once acceptable references have been received and approved,

a date will be agreed for the commencement of your tenancy. It

is essential that you sign the Tenancy Agreement and pay the

Initial Money before this date.

The Initial Money consists of:

* First month’s rent in advance

* Security Deposit - one and a half month’s rent

* Administration Fee - £50 per tenant

* Referencing Fee - £75 per tenant

* Check-in fee - minimum of £60.00 + VAT (£72)

And if there are any guarantors to the tenancy:

* Guarantor Referencing Fee - £100 per guarantor

* Agreement of Guarantee - £75

And if the tenant is a company:

*Company Referencing Fee - £175

And if agreed for the let

* Express Move-In within 3 days - £100

* Express Move-In within 5 days - £50

* Saturday Move-In - £60

The Initial Money will be detailed in the confirmation letter and

must be paid by debit card, bankers draft or building society

cheque. If you use a credit card there will be a 3% additional

charge to cover the costs.

Please note we do not have the facilities to accept cash.

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Take up the tenancy, let the letting agent tell the landlord that their property is let..

Then..

On the day of signing, hand over the deposit and rent in advance...

Put lines through the contract, crossing out the agents right to collect fees from you. There is little the letting agent can do to get in the way of you and the landlord as it is none of their business. The contract is between you and the landlord surely.

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Take up the tenancy, let the letting agent tell the landlord that their property is let..

Then..

On the day of signing, hand over the deposit and rent in advance...

Put lines through the contract, crossing out the agents right to collect fees from you. There is little the letting agent can do to get in the way of you and the landlord as it is none of their business. The contract is between you and the landlord surely.

That's why the EA doesn't hand over a signed contract to you sometimes weeks after moving in. They ask for the tenant to sign the contract and often ask for a deposit upfront.

This gives them all the cards

If the tenant quibbles then the property goes to someone else. At least in London it's been like that.

Edited by Flopsy

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Take up the tenancy, let the letting agent tell the landlord that their property is let..

Then..

On the day of signing, hand over the deposit and rent in advance...

Put lines through the contract, crossing out the agents right to collect fees from you. There is little the letting agent can do to get in the way of you and the landlord as it is none of their business. The contract is between you and the landlord surely.

Have you actually done this before though?

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That's why the EA doesn't hand over a signed contract to you sometimes weeks after moving in. They ask for the tenant to sign the contract and often ask for a deposit upfront.

This gives them all the cards

If the tenant quibbles then the property goes to someone else. At least in London it's been like that.

Is that how it works? A few weeks into a tenancy the landlord has a tenant, and absolutely no interest in paying the estate agent to find someone else or indeed in suffering a void.

Estate agents are very skilled at being a pain, so a few hundred quid in charges is probably worth paying to get them off your back. This is especially so if they collect the rent and would push you into arrears by not passing on whatever money they feel entitled to.

Then again, if they haven't got round to extorting money out of you until after you move in, there may well be a reasonable case for saying "Actually, I don't feel I need to be referenced. I won't give you consent to do so, and if the landlord doesn't like the rent that I am regularly paying, he is welcome to give me contractual notice. Similarly, I don't feel any need whatsoever to instruct you to administrate on my behalf, or to carry out a check in". I suspect the downside to you is limited to having to pay a small-claims judgement, but it's mainly that the agent will go to superhuman lengths to be an even less sufferable slimy excrement than would be usual. But this is not legal advice, and you should check with someone who knows the law before deciding not to honour a contract. With a bit of luck someone will comment who has tried.

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Is that how it works? A few weeks into a tenancy the landlord has a tenant, and absolutely no interest in paying the estate agent to find someone else or indeed in suffering a void.

Estate agents are very skilled at being a pain, so a few hundred quid in charges is probably worth paying to get them off your back. This is especially so if they collect the rent and would push you into arrears by not passing on whatever money they feel entitled to.

Then again, if they haven't got round to extorting money out of you until after you move in, there may well be a reasonable case for saying "Actually, I don't feel I need to be referenced. I won't give you consent to do so, and if the landlord doesn't like the rent that I am regularly paying, he is welcome to give me contractual notice. Similarly, I don't feel any need whatsoever to instruct you to administrate on my behalf, or to carry out a check in". I suspect the downside to you is limited to having to pay a small-claims judgement, but it's mainly that the agent will go to superhuman lengths to be an even less sufferable slimy excrement than would be usual. But this is not legal advice, and you should check with someone who knows the law before deciding not to honour a contract. With a bit of luck someone will comment who has tried.

That's how it has been for me. The EA acts as a barrier between the renter and the LL. They want to get fees from both parties. The LL is often an offshore company or lives abroad. It's been impossible for me to find a flat in the last 10 years by going direct to a LL in London. There are not enough who advertise themselves or who operate through word of mouth.

The EA control the shots before we move in by taking deposits etc. I've already been through the procedure of threatening and using the small claims court when needed for after that event. Find this a good system but it doesn't deal with the pre-move in extortion in my experience.

I don't feel that it is worth a couple of hundred pounds to "get them off my back" at all. Better uses for that money. Their behaviour doesn't improve once I've moved in either.

Edited by Flopsy

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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