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Bosses Blacklisted Unionised Workers And Political Activists

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jun/12/bosses-blacklisting-trade-unions-shrewsbury-24

Take a look at some of the comments. An absolute disgrace that this still goes on and further evidence of the Americanization of business in the UK. Where unions have been de-fanged you usually find employment agencies and a prevalence of unskilled temporary workers where employers can simply sack without notice. The unskilled ate the very people that should have unions representing them! Even in the modernised workplace, only safe to ensure employers don't have to pay out for worker injury.

Edited by workhou

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http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2013/jun/12/bosses-blacklisting-trade-unions-shrewsbury-24

Take a look at some of the comments. An absolute disgrace that this still goes on and further evidence of the Americanization of business in the UK. Where unions have been de-fanged you usually find employment agencies and a prevalence of unskilled temporary workers where employers can simply sack without notice. The unskilled ate the very people that should have unions representing them! Even in the modernised workplace, only safe to ensure employers don't have to pay out for worker injury.

I'd take any such Grauniad article with more than a pinch of salt.

But there may be a more interesting underlying point about fighting yesterday's battles. Trade unions grew into monsters that ravaged the UK economy leading to the 1970s bust, not least because the leadership was fighting the battles of their own formative years, pre-Attlee. People in charge of business today may still remember with horror a time when one or two rotten apples could destroy a whole company.

Of course that says nothing about the more fundamental problem, that a blacklist even if justifiable in principle is sure to get corrupted/abused over time.

Edited by porca misèria

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After, what was it, the third attempt to bring down an elected government, the country had had enough and the NUM finally had their ball taken away. All the other unions had their ball taken away at the same time, unfortunately.

Blame the NUM's communist idiot leadership for telling the government, and the electorate, that unions could no longer be trusted to have any power.

Edited by EUBanana

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Although in theory blacklisting is not good, in practice it is because there are simply a lot of really stupid and dangerous people on work sites, plus, there are ones who are utterly incompetent socially...arguing, back talking, mavericks, veritable poison in a crew.

I've had to punt folk from jobs for their idiotic actions and poor behaviour. Never goes down well.

Until you get one of these yahoo's working with you, destroying or undermining what you've worked hard to accomplish, or worse, injuring themselves on your watch through acts of incompetence, it's far too easy to cry foul.

Edited by cashinmattress

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I don't think unions are the point - instead it's about conspiracy, by either employers or workers. Somehow the employers' conspiracies never get punished.

Here's a point: if you had strong unions you wouldn't need a state decreed minimum wage. Why don't the Tories support that? Because they don't accept free markets.

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we have stong public sector unions and they pretty much protect their own ie public sector workers.try making things more efficient for taxpayers and you'll find they're not as weak as their spin.look at salaries for gubbermint workers over the last twenty years and that hardly shows a picture of union weakness.

to the contrary,via zanu labour and their media wing -aka BBC-they've been dictating tory party policy while they're not even in gubbermint.

if we had strong private sector unions then RBS would have 500,000 employees

Public sector unions are clearly a public policy disaster.

As for RBS, that's another public policy disaster.

Private unions are not the problem in those instances - it's the state.

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Here's a point: if you had strong unions you wouldn't need a state decreed minimum wage. Why don't the Tories support that? Because they don't accept free markets.

If companies collude on prices they are prosecuted and face heavy fines. e.g. Oil prices

If union workers do it they are protected by the law. That hardly seems fair.

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If companies collude on prices they are prosecuted and face heavy fines. e.g. Oil prices

If union workers do it they are protected by the law. That hardly seems fair.

The proles have to work for the owners of capital because they have zero capital themselves. They have zero capital because the land their ancestors lived on was forcibly confiscated by the elite over many hundreds of years. That hardly seems fair either.

Maybe these two injustices can be cancelled out in a deal. Workers agree to the abolition of most labour laws (including collective wage bargaining but excluding health and safety regulations) in exchange for a land value tax to be used to provide a citizen's income which is high enough to live on without working.

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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