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Destitute People Found Living In Squalid Network Of Caves In Stockport

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'It's a haunting image of destitution which should have no place in 21st century Britain - a homeless man sitting in a cave with his meagre belongings and rubbish strewn around him.

But the issue of men and women seeking refuge in cave systems such as this one in Stockport, Greater Manchester is worrying campaigners as figures show homelessness continues to surge in the economic downturn.

Across the country, homelessness has risen by six per cent over the course of the past year, soaring by 34 per cent compared to three years ago.

Squalid: An Estonian man is living in a network of caves in Stockport which is popular among the homeless

Up to four people at a time sleep rough in the secret warren, perched on a 20ft precipice overhanging the River Mersey.

The caves are currently occupied by a homeless Estonian man, who arrived in the region several weeks ago.

They are littered with half-empty tins of food, filthy clothing and condom wrappers - but is considered safer than sleeping on the street.

The Wellspring, a local homelessness charity, says that the caves have proved a popular temporary home for those who feel they have nowhere else to go.

Jonathan Billings, project manager for the charity, said that the number of people - including an increasing number of immigrants from Eastern Europe - seeking support has doubled over the past three years.

Many of those looking for help are formerly affluent middle-class people who lost their jobs in the downturn and were left without any source of income, he said.

'Unfortunately when people are sleeping rough they will come to very dangerous places,' Mr Billings added. 'I know of people who have fallen into the river. Sometimes kids come down and set fire to their sleeping bags when they're in them.

'But if it wasn't there, it would be somewhere else. I think readers would be surprised by the extent of it - people are hidden away from the public eye. I don't think politicians are aware of the scale of the problem.

In London, homelessness rose by 16 per cent over the year 2012-13, while parts of Greater Manchester saw rises of as much as 40 per cent.

Leading homelessness charity Crisis has called for the Government to build thousands of new affordable homes in an attempt to tackle the burgeoning problem.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2340116/Homeless-men-women-forced-live-CAVES-charities-report-surge-destitution.html#ixzz2VzrQFPbf

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

In a separate report,politicians are well aware of the problem they jsut don't care and are more obsessed with keeping the housing inspired banking ponzi afloat.

The term affordable home is a misnomer

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We have always had rough sleepers and I cannot understand why towns do not provide some sort of rough basic shelter, something akin to the old brick air raid shelters. They would at least be dry. To provide a minimum of heat on cold nights would not be expensive.

True, many of the roughies have anti social tendencies, but a big tough warden could keep an eye on them, prevent fights and also provide security from hooligans etc.

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I've seen a couple of people living under hedges on the canal near MK.

Nice view. No council taxes. Easy commute. No TV license fee. No worries about bills, fuel prices etc.

Starting to sound quite nice.

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We have always had rough sleepers and I cannot understand why towns do not provide some sort of rough basic shelter, something akin to the old brick air raid shelters.

Because even though common sense dictates that it would be better than sleeping rough, people would be up in arms that it was woefully inadequate, and that nothing less than hotel-style accommodation is acceptable for sheltering people. Therefore it is easier to do nothing and pretend there isn't a serious problem with homelessness. Or something like that.

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I've seen a couple of people living under hedges on the canal near MK.

Nice view. No council taxes. Easy commute. No TV license fee. No worries about bills, fuel prices etc.

Starting to sound quite nice.

Sleeping outside when the weather is nice is quite enjoyable, so long as you can feel safe from being robbed/attacked by nefarious types. It's the other 10 months of the year that would be the problem I would imagine.

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I'm sure if HPC's got togehter they could turn them cave's into quite something. Well insulated, bunkers full of foraged food, some forages twigs in clay (dug from the riverbank) pots, a sheepskin throwrug and a wall unit made from a nearby pine.

Disappointed the DM didn't mention the value of this cave as it was someone's home!

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We have always had rough sleepers and I cannot understand why towns do not provide some sort of rough basic shelter, something akin to the old brick air raid shelters. They would at least be dry. To provide a minimum of heat on cold nights would not be expensive.

True, many of the roughies have anti social tendencies, but a big tough warden could keep an eye on them, prevent fights and also provide security from hooligans etc.

There are places like this (Salvation Army etc) but as I understand it, they are pretty awful places where you can't sleep because of noise, people nicking your stuff etc - so many homeless people opt to find somewhere on their own. Also, any council or charity that tried to start one up would have NIMBY objections (quite often justified) and the whole thing would be an 'elf 'n' safety jamboree requiring at least one £65k a year 'outreach manager' to run it.

When I visited Romania in the early 90s, I remarked on how filthy the trains were, and a fellow passenger told me the carriages were put in sidings at night and used for temporary night shelters for the homeless. A good idea in principle but the main problem was they didn't clean them afterwards... :blink:

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I've seen a couple of people living under hedges on the canal near MK.

Nice view. No council taxes. Easy commute. No TV license fee. No worries about bills, fuel prices etc.

Starting to sound quite nice.

It gets better. Canal hedges are also probably the number one source for 2nd hand top shelf magazines.

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I expect that's the legacy of driving them out from traditional and visible places like London's Embankment.

But I wonder if there's also a correlation with empty homes since the coming of zero interest rates mean world+dog are under no pressure to sell or let a place they've inherited or moved out of?

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We can't have people living on land for free screams the Daily Mail,

Think of the squalor!

I'm sure Gidiot will sell him a 95% £200k mtge.

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'It's a haunting image of destitution which should have no place in 21st century Britain - a homeless man sitting in a cave with his meagre belongings and rubbish strewn around him.

But the issue of men and women seeking refuge in cave systems such as this one in Stockport, Greater Manchester is worrying campaigners as figures show homelessness continues to surge in the economic downturn.

Across the country, homelessness has risen by six per cent over the course of the past year, soaring by 34 per cent compared to three years ago.

Squalid: An Estonian man is living in a network of caves in Stockport which is popular among the homeless

Up to four people at a time sleep rough in the secret warren, perched on a 20ft precipice overhanging the River Mersey.

The caves are currently occupied by a homeless Estonian man, who arrived in the region several weeks ago.

They are littered with half-empty tins of food, filthy clothing and condom wrappers - but is considered safer than sleeping on the street.

The Wellspring, a local homelessness charity, says that the caves have proved a popular temporary home for those who feel they have nowhere else to go.

Jonathan Billings, project manager for the charity, said that the number of people - including an increasing number of immigrants from Eastern Europe - seeking support has doubled over the past three years.

Many of those looking for help are formerly affluent middle-class people who lost their jobs in the downturn and were left without any source of income, he said.

'Unfortunately when people are sleeping rough they will come to very dangerous places,' Mr Billings added. 'I know of people who have fallen into the river. Sometimes kids come down and set fire to their sleeping bags when they're in them.

'But if it wasn't there, it would be somewhere else. I think readers would be surprised by the extent of it - people are hidden away from the public eye. I don't think politicians are aware of the scale of the problem.

In London, homelessness rose by 16 per cent over the year 2012-13, while parts of Greater Manchester saw rises of as much as 40 per cent.

Leading homelessness charity Crisis has called for the Government to build thousands of new affordable homes in an attempt to tackle the burgeoning problem.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2VzrQFPbf

Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

In a separate report,politicians are well aware of the problem they jsut don't care and are more obsessed with keeping the housing inspired banking ponzi afloat.

I'm curious as to why you highlight the sections you have, yet leave the "Sometimes kids come down and set fire to their sleeping bags when they're in them." as was.

I am also disappointed that no one else seems to have noticed.

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It doesn't seem all that long ago people could buy Northern terraces for a couple of thousand pounds. Maybe not in Stockport, but a few miles down the road in Manchester. People would buy whole rows of houses in Salford for a few hundred pounds each, spend a couple of thousand fixing them up and then still make a loss on them. Those same slum houses sold for 100k at the peak of the madness. They are still around 50k now.

We went from people being able to buy a nice house for cheap, thus having a much higher quality of life, to houses bankrupting all the banks, a generation of homeless and piles of negative equity. It's surprising how many people actually think this is a good thing.

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I've seen a couple of people living under hedges on the canal near MK.

Nice view. No council taxes. Easy commute. No TV license fee. No worries about bills, fuel prices etc.

Starting to sound quite nice.

Think of the rent you would save. A sort of hedge fund...

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cue, no doubt the normal whining about me posting DM articles.

I'm more worried about the DM treating a charity fundraising campaign as news.

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I'm curious as to why you highlight the sections you have, yet leave the "Sometimes kids come down and set fire to their sleeping bags when they're in them." as was.

I am also disappointed that no one else seems to have noticed.

I read kids as a euthanism for council.

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But some of these are hard working Eastern Europeans; you know the types of superior worker 'businesses' cry out for

Obviously even they need to work harder.

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An Estonian man is living in a network of caves in Stockport which is popular among the homeless

Because the rules say that EU migrant workers must actually be supporting themselves by working?

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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