Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

inflating

Heavy Rain & Satellite Tv Signal Loss

Recommended Posts

I used to work for Sky TV, the strength of signal is highly variable, is weaker when there is cloud cover and is affected by rain. Rather bizarrely, it is particularly affected if there is a rain-soaked tree anywhere near the dish, satellite TV systems hate trees more than they hate buildings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to work for Sky TV, the strength of signal is highly variable, is weaker when there is cloud cover and is affected by rain. Rather bizarrely, it is particularly affected if there is a rain-soaked tree anywhere near the dish, satellite TV systems hate trees more than they hate buildings.

Thanks Harry

I have used sat TV for a few years, in the UK and now abroad, and never previously realised heavy rain caused this or it slipped my mind maybe. Every time there's some proper rain, I lose BBC World, Euronews and quite a few other channels. At least I know it's not my pretty quality good German-made LNB :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How common is it to lose several channels either during (or even after) a heavy rainstorm?

I tend to lose the BBC and other satellite TV after a rainstorm. Their website says it's not unusual http://www.bbc.co.uk/reception/digitaltv/satellite.shtml

What causes it after the rain has stopped? Rain in the clouds or something wrong with my LNB?

I changed from Sky to Virgin due to this problem. I thought it was pathetic given how much £££s I was giving to Sky.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A neat trick the Americans and Russians use is to fly the satellite closer to the Sun after heavy rain, to dry it out.

They did that once and it got too close and the solder melted on one of the circuit boards, so had to send another up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest eight

I changed from Sky to Virgin due to this problem. I thought it was pathetic given how much £££s I was giving to Sky.

Even on Virgin I find the picture quality on certain channels (ITV4 and all the C5's are the worst culprits) to be very poor, "blocky" if you know what I mean. Makes me wonder if Virgin just pick up Freeview with a really crap aerial and then rebroadcast it back down your cable?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Positive ions.

Good for people's health, but not so good for advertisers who lose audience!

I changed from Sky to Virgin due to this problem. I thought it was pathetic given how much £££s I was giving to Sky.

I am amazed at this problem, I never noticed it before!

A larger dish would probably help. I had signal problems in heavy rain and replaced the mini dish with the next size up, massive improvement.

You're right, I am using a small dish, so I'll probably have to up the size.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget, the problem may not be with the broadcast itself, but arise from interference from another source. Anything from radar to a badly supressed car can mess up reception.

Satellites are the ones 'up there', aren't they? Or am I confusing them with stalagmites, I always get the two mixed up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't forget, the problem may not be with the broadcast itself, but arise from interference from another source. Anything from radar to a badly supressed car can mess up reception.

Satellites are the ones 'up there', aren't they? Or am I confusing them with stalagmites, I always get the two mixed up.

TV signals are very poor quality on "freeview" too - some channels are unwatchable without a laborious retune...

Progress hey :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even on Virgin I find the picture quality on certain channels (ITV4 and all the C5's are the worst culprits) to be very poor, "blocky" if you know what I mean. Makes me wonder if Virgin just pick up Freeview with a really crap aerial and then rebroadcast it back down your cable?

Virgin can only retransmit what they're given by the other broadcasters but I usually find mine to be perfect. Only occasionally the Sky Sports channels go blocky and I always wonder if that's just News International playing dirty tricks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TV signals are very poor quality on "freeview" too - some channels are unwatchable without a laborious retune...

Progress hey :blink:

You are right about that! I'd rather have a few channels in good quality, but no, we get 50 channels of shopping tat! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest unfunded_liability

How common is it to lose several channels either during (or even after) a heavy rainstorm?

I tend to lose the BBC and other satellite TV after a rainstorm. Their website says it's not unusual http://www.bbc.co.uk/reception/digitaltv/satellite.shtml

What causes it after the rain has stopped? Rain in the clouds or something wrong with my LNB?

Assuming your dish has been reasonably aligned you need a bigger dish. The standard oval sky minidishes are cr*p with rain or snow even in high signal strength areas. With a 60cm mesh dish never had any pixelation or drop outs, when sky upgraded us to sky+ and changed our dish to a minidish we started getting drop outs. I changed it back to a 60cm. It's easy enough to do and align as long as you're comfortable with heights.

With dishes size matters.

The power coming from the geostationary satellite is incredibly weak. The satellite transponder power was typically 20W in the '80s. To give you some idea, imagine trying to see a 20W light bulb 36,000 km away - anyone would have trouble seeing a 20W bulb 50 meters away! This is difficult enough on a totally clear day, so now imagine the cloud, mist, fog, rain and snow in the way and you are a little closer to how difficult it is to receive satellite signals.

http://www.titosat.com/default.aspx?articleID=4725&heading=About%20satellite%20TV

ed. sp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depending on the channel, the encoding may be of dubious quality. In order to squeeze as many channels into a limited part of the radio spectrum, the bandwidth of any data stream may be reduced by reducing the sampling rate and weakening the encoding, which can both reduce the quality of the signal directly (bit depth, sample rate, etc.), and weaken the error-correction coding used.

I don't know specific details, but I believe that some 'economy' channels may be more prone to interference and signal corruption because of this.

iAnother thing that annoys me is that the audio used in digital TV, like digital radio, uses compression methods similar to MP3. One more reason why I prefer to listen to my CDs and gramophone, rather than watch TV. I may be getting old, but I'm not that deaf yet.

So many technological 'improvements' are just a means of delivering stuff more cheaply to the consumer (without passing the savings on), rather than offering a better product to the consumer.

Never mind the quality, feel the bandwidth.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Never mind the quality, feel the bandwidth.

Actually the one good thing about "digital TV" is the radio channels! You get a fine bit rate from R3, much better than DAB! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sky uplinks the signal to the sattelite from a large dish at their London HQ (near the Gillette building on the A4 Great West Road)

This makes the signal susceptible to weather both here and wherever you are in the UK (or Spain) receiving it.

If I recall correctly many of the bars and clubs on Tenerife and other Canary islands offer sky sometimes illegally with a UK card (registered at a UK address). The islands are right on the boundary of the footprint and tend to lose signal completely after dark.

Only those that pay and get the signal via Sky Spain (piped via another sat) can guarantee the signal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are right about that! I'd rather have a few channels in good quality, but no, we get 50 channels of shopping tat! ;)

.........don't forget all the .......Errrrr .....late night ...........Errrrrrr ----Religious Channels ;)

Yes and of course the junk you thought I was going to say :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The truth is that the rain soaks up random pixels from the tv program, stealing them and bonding them into a solution. Down all the drains are blurry messy colourful attempts to recombine these pixels into a program. And then it all washes down to the sewage treatment place where it extracts any pixels of K&P.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The truth is that the rain soaks up random pixels from the tv program, stealing them and bonding them into a solution. Down all the drains are blurry messy colourful attempts to recombine these pixels into a program. And then it all washes down to the sewage treatment place where it extracts any pixels of K&P.

Indeed. And in the early days of colour TV, rain used to make the colours run.

*Nerdy analgue fact: When I lived in south London in my youth, you could work out how far away from the Tower Blocks of Croydon we were by measuring the strong ghosting echo in the TV picture, using calculations for the line rate (625 x 25 Frames/Sec = 15625 lines/sec) and the speed of light (which in those days was an Imperial 186,282 miles/sec) and other PAL geekery. I reckon I could have navigated anywhere in London using a BBC test Card, triangulation and a weak TV signal - who needs SatNav?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even on Virgin I find the picture quality on certain channels (ITV4 and all the C5's are the worst culprits) to be very poor, "blocky" if you know what I mean. Makes me wonder if Virgin just pick up Freeview with a really crap aerial and then rebroadcast it back down your cable?

Not Virgin's fault as far as I can tell- ITVs 2-4 have always looked abominable on both Freeview and Virgin- they just use too low a bit rate. It used to be a particular problem when ITV3 broadcast friendly international football matches- fast action became a pixellated, barely watchable mess.

Thankfully they* now broadcast all the ITV channels in HD as well, and they're as good as any other HD channel, as far as I can tell.

*Virgin at least- not sure about FreeviewHD, it's built into my big telly but I've only ever used it once, when the Virgin box died during the Strictly final.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Assuming your dish has been reasonably aligned you need a bigger dish. The standard oval sky minidishes are cr*p with rain or snow even in high signal strength areas. With a 60cm mesh dish never had any pixelation or drop outs, when sky upgraded us to sky+ and changed our dish to a minidish we started getting drop outs. I changed it back to a 60cm. It's easy enough to do and align as long as you're comfortable with heights.

With dishes size matters.

http://www.titosat.com/default.aspx?articleID=4725&heading=About%20satellite%20TV

ed. sp

Agreed, I put a 80cm dish up for the missus to watch German tv on 19.2 - even when it's chucking down its never dropped. Depending on how far north you are you will benefit from a bigger dish - if there are trees or anything else that can hold water in the dishes view that will have a factor - sometimes though the lnb itself fills with water, which may or may not drain straight out again so may only be apparant during the rain

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.