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Premier League Footballer With Playboy Model Fiancee Told Tenants He Would Cut Off Gas And Electricity If They Did Not Leave Within Two Weeks

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2337330/Premier-League-footballer-Playboy-model-fiancee-told-tenants-cut-gas-electricity-did-leave-weeks.html

'

A Premier League footballer told his tenants they would have their gas and electricity cut off if they did not leave his property within two weeks.

Southampton forward Lee Barnard, 28, and his fiancee Tonya French who he is due to marry today, bought the 14-bedroom townhouse in Chelmsford, Essex recently.

Barnard, the landlord, wrote to the 11 residents telling them to get out because he wants to renovate the property.

The former Tottenham player offered a £100 'incentive' to the tenants - including vulnerable people as well as those on housing and disability benefits - to move out quickly.

The tenants, who have individual flats in the large detached house, should legaly have been given two months to quit.

Ray Ellis, 52, is on disability benefits and was shocked by the demand to leave so suddenly.

He said: 'I have asked for more time to find somewhere else to go - we are not finding it easy to find an alternative.'

Three of the residents have moved out since the demands were made last month.

Officials from Chelmsford Borough Council have told the residents they are legally allowed to stay.

Barnard blamed the situation on a 'mix up' and said he had been cooperative throughout.

'We wrote to the tenants when we found out that the notice period was not long enough,' he said last night.

'We were happy to extent the notice period and have been in regular contact with the council as well.

'I have not been trying to bully the tenants - I bought the property, I think it is quite run-down and needs a lot of work and I am within my rights to serve the notice period and that is now a sufficient one.

'It's just a misunderstanding with the handover from the previous owner who said we only had to give them notice of a day, so with the rent-free period and £100 we felt it was a good offer.

'The council are fully aware of the situation and are happy with the arrangements - the first letters were just sent out with the wrong date.''

A Chelmsford City Council spokesman said: 'I confirm tenants did contact us and they were advised they have been served an illegal notice and that they don't have to leave by June 1.

'We informed them of their rights and offered our help and support in finding new housing when the tenancy ends.

'The new owner has been advised of their legal obligations and the new owners have been completely compliant and are now following the correct legal process'

great advert for BTL

Another Rachmann wanabee who is " happy to extend" the notice period to the bounds of legality. How nice.

Edited by cheeznbreed

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Another Rachmann wanabee who is " happy to extend" the notice period to the bounds of legality. How nice.

It was on the market at Offers Over £800,000.

I can't see if there's any further PropertyBee data because it's offline for that thing it does at night, crunching new data.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-32153053.html

http://www.zoopla.co.uk/for-sale/details/18225466

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Nothing unusual about this. Landlordism corrupts everyone who gets involved with it, one way or another.

When was there only need to give a day's notice? 1613?

I don't see that the notice period makes so much difference.

Eviction is eviction.

Evict people because of their race and its a war crime, do it to make a profit and its just business.

Edited by (Blizzard)

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I don't follow.

And does one-day's notice sound at all legally or practically likely?

I thought my point was very simple.

Forcing people out of their homes to make a personal profit, is wrong.

Telling them in advance doesn't change that. Being legal doesn't change that.

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I thought my point was very simple.

Forcing people out of their homes to make a personal profit, is wrong.

Telling them in advance doesn't change that. Being legal doesn't change that.

Thanks for your post.

To get back to my point, when was 1-day's notice legal? 100 years ago? 300 years ago? Never?

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The sooner private rentals get consolidated into the hands of properly regulated corporations the better. Putting the roofs over people's heads in the hands of unregulated, uninformed and usually cash-poor amateurs is the worst way to organise residential housing. If amateurs want exposure to privately rented housing, let them buy shares in these corporations.

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The sooner private rentals get consolidated into the hands of properly regulated corporations the better. Putting the roofs over people's heads in the hands of unregulated, uninformed and usually cash-poor amateurs is the worst way to organise residential housing. If amateurs want exposure to privately rented housing, let them buy shares in these corporations.

No you can't trust big corporations, they're only in it to make a profit. If you give it to a local authority they will make a loss and the council tax payers will be fleeced. No regulate the sector over to the state, Big GOVERNMENT is always better !

Do you get the sarcasm?

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The sooner private rentals get consolidated into the hands of properly regulated corporations the better. Putting the roofs over people's heads in the hands of unregulated, uninformed and usually cash-poor amateurs is the worst way to organise residential housing. If amateurs want exposure to privately rented housing, let them buy shares in these corporations.

I agree, as long as the corps are proper bodies and fit for purpose. What chance of that??!

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No you can't trust big corporations, they're only in it to make a profit. If you give it to a local authority they will make a loss and the council tax payers will be fleeced. No regulate the sector over to the state, Big GOVERNMENT is always better !

Do you get the sarcasm?

I see, or maybe I don't.

You think that landlordism - owning, operating, making rules, and collecting money within specified geographical areas - shouldn't be done by government?

If that is what you think, then it's about the most ironic thing I've ever read.

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Guest eight

Another Rachmann wanabee who is " happy to extend" the notice period to the bounds of legality. How nice.

Not defending the guy (and "Premier League footballer" or indeed even "Southampton forward" are generous descriptions) but it doesn't explicitly say that he wants to re-let it. Sure it sounds amazing that anybody could think one day's notice would ever be reasonable but, in my experience, footballers entirely deserve their reputation for being a bit thick. Yet they themselves sometimes might only get told after the fact that they're going out on loan to Stenhousemuir, or wherever. It can be a pretty transient life.

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I see, or maybe I don't.

You think that landlordism - owning, operating, making rules, and collecting money within specified geographical areas - shouldn't be done by government?

If that is what you think, then it's about the most ironic thing I've ever read.

Are you a communist?

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just a small point, but two months notice does not end in eviction at that time.

eviction arrives after a court hearing, arguments submitted and the bailiffs turn up.

I cant understand why the tenants didnt go for the £100 incentive....

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Not defending the guy (and "Premier League footballer" or indeed even "Southampton forward" are generous descriptions) but it doesn't explicitly say that he wants to re-let it. Sure it sounds amazing that anybody could think one day's notice would ever be reasonable but, in my experience, footballers entirely deserve their reputation for being a bit thick. Yet they themselves sometimes might only get told after the fact that they're going out on loan to Stenhousemuir, or wherever. It can be a pretty transient life.

I don't dispute that, although it cuts boths ways-is this guy likely to have been a tenant himself? That ought to make him more likely to be aware of the situation.

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I don't dispute that, although it cuts boths ways-is this guy likely to have been a tenant himself? That ought to make him more likely to be aware of the situation.

When I was 28, i had no idea what a tenant was...other than those that lived in hi rise council slums....Pig ignorant I was, Im sure this guy, who plays a game for a living, had no clue either.

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When I was 28, i had no idea what a tenant was...other than those that lived in hi rise council slums....Pig ignorant I was, Im sure this guy, who plays a game for a living, had no clue either.

I'll try that defence next time I'm accused of murder, stealing, assault...

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He had £800,000 to spend on a house, so he bought one with tenants. Must have been distracted by the playboy fiancee or perhaps he's thick as sh1t.

I think we all know the answer to that.

'It's just a misunderstanding with the handover from the previous owner who said we only had to give them notice of a day

His excuse sounds infantile. A man with millions at his disposal and he cant even hire a lawyer or conveyancer to explain things to him in the rudimentary terms he would understand.

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His excuse sounds infantile. A man with millions at his disposal and he cant even hire a lawyer or conveyancer to explain things to him in the rudimentary terms he would understand.

It's about time they brought out Legal Evictions For Dummies, and for the younger probably first time landlords, the My Little Bailiff action figure and accompanying pop-up book with colouring in section.

As BL said, in England a tenancy can only legally be ended by a court. That usually takes several weeks after the notice period has ended if the tenant has not vacated. IIRC it takes 4 to 6 weeks from application.

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I'll try that defence next time I'm accused of murder, stealing, assault...

I am not defending him...im just saying that peoples world view of noneveryday things, like what a tenant is, is not clear cut and obvious, unlike the crimes you mention, which are drummed into us at school.

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When was there only need to give a day's notice? 1613?

There was some local court process to go through for bad home-owning debtors who owed their creditors, in the Elizabethan depression from 1570, although probably much less for tenants. Perhaps people counting more on fairness.

Would you believe it, there were people who'd bought lots of properties and over-stretched themselves back then. That's what depressions are for, to balance things out, and give younger people an opportunity. Not to QE and low-interest rate and forbearance to keep prices high and remaining in the possession of the greedy/over-leveraged.

The house of every one is to him as his castle and fortress, as well for his defence against injury and violence, as for his repose.

- (1604) Semayne’s case

For home-owners, or possessors of the land, but still they have to pay their mortgage. The 'death pledge' swear-on-my-life to repay contract they entered to maintain that right and possession. Tenants should have the similar rights though, other than for emergencies for landlords to enter, and not be given 1 day notice by landlords or prospective buyers who don't think tenants' postions are worthy of getting legal advice over.

The poorest man may in his cottage bid defiance to all the forces of the Crown. It may be frail – its roof may shake – the wind may blow through it – the storm may enter – the rain may enter – but the King of England cannot enter – all his force dares not cross the threshold of the ruined tenement.

(1763) William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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