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@contradevian

Quietly Impressed With Freebsd 9.1

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A few days ago decided to re-acquaint myself with FreeBSD 9.1 after digging out my old Acer Travelmate 230 with a rather challenged 1.7ghz Celeron processor and 512MB of ram.

This used to be my main laptop a few years ago, and originally came with Windows XP Home. I had tried and failed in the past to get Linux on the thing.

The FreeBSD install was very quick. I used the net boot install ISO, just to get a very basic OS installed (didn't bother with ports to start with, just the kernel and the basic OS). The install version found the my broadband router for DHCP straight away and then it was just a matter of choosing a mirror site. I just used defaults to partition the drive.

Once the machine booted I was able to use freebsd-update and get the ports tree.

Runs very well, sound and "X" just worked. Well with X I made the mistake of installing xorg-minimal which wasn't sufficient to run Fluxbox the window manager on.

FreeBSD recommend switching to a new package manager, using the pkg install command, rather than pkg_add -r and so on, which is bit odd, as there don't seem to be a lot of repositories at the moment. I managed to find one operated by a UK ISP. I've configured portmaster to use the package format, although I'd rather hoped to go binary only giving this machine doesn't have a powerful CPU.

Currently typing this with FreeBSD 9.1 + Xorg + Fluxbox + Surf (a minimal browser). Surf doesn't support tabbed browsing, but the Window Manager allows you to tab multiple windows from various app's (surf, xterm, rxvt, vlc, etc).

The only failure is wireless, but then again my PCMCIA cards and USB wireless cards are pretty ancient. You would really have to buy a supported device, but then again I'm quite happy with a wired network for testing. Normal wired network "just works" of course.

So if you have any old hardware knocking about try FreeBSD, though these days I tend to play with Virtual box and VMware images.

Curiously FreeBSD 9.1 doesn't offer ZFS filesystem during the install as yet (just UFS) though I gather PC-BSD ( a kind of desktop friendly version of FreeBSD) does.

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FreeBSD used to be top totty! :huh:

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FreeBSD used to be top totty! :huh:

Isn't it still, for those who consider Linux too dumbed-down?

Or did it lose something when Apple decided to make their OS a FreeBSD clone and poached Jordan Hubbard back in 2001?

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It's St. Nerd's day, and I am building an eight core server! :huh:

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Isn't it still, for those who consider Linux too dumbed-down?

Or did it lose something when Apple decided to make their OS a FreeBSD clone and poached Jordan Hubbard back in 2001?

erm OSX is based on Mach 2.2 which is based on, not cloned from, of BSD 4.3.

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I have the Unix family tree on my bathroom wall, for contemplative moments!

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I have the Unix family tree on my bathroom wall, for contemplative moments!

You mean you don't have it memorised already?

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Guest eight

A few days ago decided to re-acquaint myself with FreeBSD 9.1 after digging out my old Acer Travelmate 230 with a rather challenged 1.7ghz Celeron processor and 512MB of ram.

This used to be my main laptop a few years ago, and originally came with Windows XP Home. I had tried and failed in the past to get Linux on the thing.

The FreeBSD install was very quick. I used the net boot install ISO, just to get a very basic OS installed (didn't bother with ports to start with, just the kernel and the basic OS). The install version found the my broadband router for DHCP straight away and then it was just a matter of choosing a mirror site. I just used defaults to partition the drive.

Once the machine booted I was able to use freebsd-update and get the ports tree.

Runs very well, sound and "X" just worked. Well with X I made the mistake of installing xorg-minimal which wasn't sufficient to run Fluxbox the window manager on.

FreeBSD recommend switching to a new package manager, using the pkg install command, rather than pkg_add -r and so on, which is bit odd, as there don't seem to be a lot of repositories at the moment. I managed to find one operated by a UK ISP. I've configured portmaster to use the package format, although I'd rather hoped to go binary only giving this machine doesn't have a powerful CPU.

Currently typing this with FreeBSD 9.1 + Xorg + Fluxbox + Surf (a minimal browser). Surf doesn't support tabbed browsing, but the Window Manager allows you to tab multiple windows from various app's (surf, xterm, rxvt, vlc, etc).

The only failure is wireless, but then again my PCMCIA cards and USB wireless cards are pretty ancient. You would really have to buy a supported device, but then again I'm quite happy with a wired network for testing. Normal wired network "just works" of course.

So if you have any old hardware knocking about try FreeBSD, though these days I tend to play with Virtual box and VMware images.

Curiously FreeBSD 9.1 doesn't offer ZFS filesystem during the install as yet (just UFS) though I gather PC-BSD ( a kind of desktop friendly version of FreeBSD) does.

Yep. Barely understood a word of that.

I don't think a post on here has ever gone so comprehensively over my head, and I know Erranta.....

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Yep. Barely understood a word of that.

I don't think a post on here has ever gone so comprehensively over my head, and I know Erranta.....

+1

:D

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It's St. Nerd's day, and I am building an eight core server! :huh:

Eight core server? Sounds like a toy, eight cores is nothing these days, I used to work on a 20 core server (SUN Sparccenter 2000) already back in the '90s! :)

---

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You could probably pick up a 20 core Sun for next to nothing now. Some quality hardware goes for peanuts sometimes.

And got wireless working OK on FreeBSD 9.1 too. Thanks to a cheapo Belking USB dongle I found in a drawer.

Quite nerdy sitting in a cafe, scanning for wireless networks with ifconfig to get your SSID and then editing your /etc/wpa_supplicant file in vi or emacs

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Eight core server? Sounds like a toy, eight cores is nothing these days, I used to work on a 20 core server (SUN Sparccenter 2000) already back in the '90s! :)

---

Yes, it is a toy, but it makes a lot of noise! I am very familiar with Sparcs! ;)

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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