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The Knimbies who say No

Real Nappies- The Lowdown

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Mrs cheez and I are expecting our first HPC disciple nipper, and amongst the adverts we've been given so far when attending appointments has been one about real nappies.

They appeal to me on a few fronts- waste avoidance, overall cost etc, I'm not really here to ask about the resource balance but just how they stack up in everday use.

They vary in price quite a bit, but I've read a few good things about fairly cheap ones such as these:

http://www.dudeybaba.co.uk/bulk-orders.asp

£4-£5 each compared to about 10p-15p per disposable.

Are these things good? My prime concern is:

Do they really work from birth until they learn to use the bog? They will surely be massive on a newborn while a two year old might look like he or she is in budgie smugglers.

If they are decent I'll just buy some and use them from the off.

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From the off my wife always said no way when it came to washable nappies and considering we lived in a flat it seemed a not unreasonable stance so I cannot help you I'm afraid. Good luck.

Although given the weather of the past couple of years, I would suggest you also fully investigate your secondary drying methods beforehand.

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Congratulations! Say goodbye to your old life.

Washable nappies are in the long run cheaper and more environmentally friendly but after a few months of erratic sleep you won't give a monkeys and I bet you go for the easy option

I did.

:D

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From the off my wife always said no way when it came to washable nappies and considering we lived in a flat it seemed a not unreasonable stance so I cannot help you I'm afraid. Good luck.

Although given the weather of the past couple of years, I would suggest you also fully investigate your secondary drying methods beforehand.

Good point on the drying, will have a think about that.

Should be easy enough to isolate the hazardous material as we have plenty of space thankfully.

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Congratulations! Say goodbye to your old life.

Washable nappies are in the long run cheaper and more environmentally friendly but after a few months of erratic sleep you won't give a monkeys and I bet you go for the easy option

I did.

:D

Cheers, yes I suspect a mix will be used depending on the circumstances. Would be good to get into a routine of real ones if possible.

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Good point on the drying, will have a think about that.

clothes drying is worth an off topic thread all in itself (thread bump coming)

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Although given the weather of the past couple of years, I would suggest you also fully investigate your secondary drying methods beforehand.

^ This.

We live in a small terraced house, and during the winter it was hard to get all the washing to dry (no tumble drier). Our little rugrat dirties clothes like there's no tomorrow... There's no way we could also have washed and dried half a dozen nappies a day on top.

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^ This.

We live in a small terraced house, and during the winter it was hard to get all the washing to dry (no tumble drier). Our little rugrat dirties clothes like there's no tomorrow... There's no way we could also have washed and dried half a dozen nappies a day on top.

Ok, drying capacity is key. We ought to be in with a chance, we've plenty of space and racks etc.

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Mrs cheez and I are expecting our first HPC disciple nipper, and amongst the adverts we've been given so far when attending appointments has been one about real nappies.

They appeal to me on a few fronts- waste avoidance, overall cost etc, I'm not really here to ask about the resource balance but just how they stack up in everday use.

They vary in price quite a bit, but I've read a few good things about fairly cheap ones such as these:

http://www.dudeybaba.co.uk/bulk-orders.asp

£4-£5 each compared to about 10p-15p per disposable.

Are these things good? My prime concern is:

Do they really work from birth until they learn to use the bog? They will surely be massive on a newborn while a two year old might look like he or she is in budgie smugglers.

If they are decent I'll just buy some and use them from the off.

If you do go the disposable route, get good ones. The difference between Huggies and cheaper brands is a whole heap of nappy rash and accidents.

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If you do go the disposable route, get good ones. The difference between Huggies and cheaper brands is a whole heap of nappy rash and accidents.

No shit but huggies have exited the mainstream UK nappy market

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Congratulations, Mr & Mrs cheez

Although we are frugal and recycle obsessively, we use disposables.

To carry on from previous posts, weve found that cheap or supermarket own brand nappies are OK for daytime, but we use a premium one at night, as that will be on for longer.

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congratulations on the good news. life is about to get a whole lot better.

we tried reusable nappies but it didn't last long. they are hard to wash, hard to dry and they still smell sometimes, even after washing. my wife had some tricks whereby she used to keep the used ones in water a plastic bin with (i think) tea tree oil

we were also thinking that if the environmental cost of all that soap, electricity and water were offset against disposable's we'd probably be even stevens

dealing with a newborn is difficult enough as it is. go down to tesco's and get some pampers.

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3 months in and we are still on disposables... the fancy reusable ones I picked up seem to be enormous, and also quite abrasive/stiff round the edges, leaving red marks around her waist. No problem with the lightweight and easy pampers new baby stuff, which also has a handy yellow/blue indicator to show how wet it is.

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Good point on the drying, will have a think about that.

Using nappy liners can help, keeps the main cotton nappy cleaner to clean and sterilise.....having a baby this time of year the washing line should dry in no time....keep a few disposables for visiting etc.....good luck with whatever you decide and enjoy your new bundle of joy. ;)

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dealing with a newborn is difficult enough as it is. go down to tesco's and get some pampers.

+1

When you're changing some poo stained nappy at some god-awful hour, the last thing you want is to faff around with soaking and stuff. Change nappy, old one gets rolled and lobbed into the back garden for retrieval the next morning. Clean baby, smell gone, go back to bed.

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Guest eight

No shit but huggies have exited the mainstream UK nappy market

Probably because Lidl ones are better and about half the price. If I was them I'd have taken my ball home too.

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And another thing, if your wife breast feeds and uses washable nipple pads, do not let her put them into the washing machine loose.

They will get sucked through the holes in the drum and tangled in the impellor of the drain pump, completely borking it.

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Using nappy liners can help, keeps the main cotton nappy cleaner to clean and sterilise.....having a baby this time of year the washing line should dry in no time....keep a few disposables for visiting etc.....good luck with whatever you decide and enjoy your new bundle of joy. ;)

Yes, liners are integral to it all. Cheers for the kind thoughts, although it ain't due until November. Just getting myself organised..

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And another thing, if your wife breast feeds and uses washable nipple pads, do not let her put them into the washing machine loose.

They will get sucked through the holes in the drum and tangled in the impellor of the drain pump, completely borking it.

Noted, thanks.

Also cheers to rxe/RichB, seems disposables are hard to beat for convenience.

I suspect we'll use a mixture as and when circumstances allow. I'm not interested in making life harder just to make a point.

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Guest eight

And another thing, if your wife breast feeds and uses washable nipple pads, do not let her put them into the washing machine loose.

They will get sucked through the holes in the drum and tangled in the impellor of the drain pump, completely borking it.

I read a book in the library along the lines of "Man's guide to child rearing". It said don't be surprised if your washing machine is knackered after six months. It wasn't that bad for us but I thought the comment was basically sound and worth repeating.

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I read a book in the library along the lines of "Man's guide to child rearing". It said don't be surprised if your washing machine is knackered after six months. It wasn't that bad for us but I thought the comment was basically sound and worth repeating.

Yep. First child 2003. Original washing machine (Hotpoint) broke 3 times by 2004. New Hotpoint bought 2004. New Hotpoint broke after 13 months. Went out and bought a Miele in 2005. Miele still going strong.

You need a Miele.

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Yep. First child 2003. Original washing machine (Hotpoint) broke 3 times by 2004. New Hotpoint bought 2004. New Hotpoint broke after 13 months. Went out and bought a Miele in 2005. Miele still going strong.

You need a Miele.

Hotpoint/indesit is nappies pants.......couldn't even say you get what you pay for when you pay good money for getting something that doesn't do a job for long before it packs up at a further great expense.IMOE. ;)

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  • 277 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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