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"full Impact Of Housing Benefit Reforms In Private Rented Sector 'still To Happen' - Report"

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So they implement reforms to contain the costs and that London will be 'hardest hit' and no one has had to move because they have given London councils £130million to 'help'.

How does that work then?

I guess it suits both the potential voters who want to see benefits clamped down on, while simultaneously throwing a lifeline to those afftected by the policy and making sure that it has no visible "ugly" effects lest people remind themselves of the "nasty party" analogy.

With one obvious complete exception - in this government the general rule iappears to be that if it would be at all unpopular with anyone, it won't happen - there's that next general election to think about. Deficit, what deficit? Stage management is the key.

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I guess it suits both the potential voters who want to see benefits clamped down on, while simultaneously throwing a lifeline to those afftected by the policy and making sure that it has no visible "ugly" effects lest people remind themselves of the "nasty party" analogy.

With one obvious complete exception - in this government the general rule iappears to be that if it would be at all unpopular with anyone, it won't happen - there's that next general election to think about. Deficit, what deficit? Stage management is the key.

Correction - unpopular with anyone who is likely to vote, the young don't vote so it's ok to shaft them.

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Correction - unpopular with anyone who is likely to vote, the young don't vote so it's ok to shaft them.

Even if the young did vote at the same rate as older groups, there aren't enough of them to outvote the older homeowner caste. Politicians know this, so they don't bother offering anything the young would want, so the young don't bother voting.

I guess this is the fault of the young for not being born in large enough numbers?

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Even if the young did vote at the same rate as older groups, there aren't enough of them to outvote the older homeowner caste. Politicians know this, so they don't bother offering anything the young would want, so the young don't bother voting.

I guess this is the fault of the young for not being born in large enough numbers?

The young have always been outnumbered by everyone else.

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The young have always been outnumbered by everyone else.

True, so the interesting question is whether government policy has become increasingly anti-young over the last 30 years, and if so, why.

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True, so the interesting question is whether government policy has become increasingly anti-young over the last 30 years, and if so, why.

I am not trying to be patronising but I do think that a majority of young people born, say, after 1979 are more apathetic than previous young people. I also think that it has been deliberate policy to make young people more apathetic as part of the process of eliminating the attitudes of the post war upstarts who just didn't know their place. Unless things change big time, the period from 1945-1980 will be looked upon by future generations as a one off time in history when the natural order of things was turned upside down until those who run things got their act together and stamped it out so that things could return to 'normal'.

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I am not trying to be patronising but I do think that a majority of young people born, say, after 1979 are more apathetic than previous young people.

What were people born before 1979 passionate about in their youths? Free stuff from the government, usually to be paid for by future generations? Maggie's most popular policy was selling off council houses at less than market price (i.e. a loss to the taxpayer). Pretty easy to be passionate about somebody else paying for you to have nice things.

The challenge for the current generation of young people is more difficult. They need to start saying no to some of the bills that were run up by older people in their name. It's not an easy message to understand.

I think there is hope though. Young people now are getting used to not getting free stuff. They paid for their own university educations, they don't qualify for housing benefit and are expected to do workfare for unemployment benefits, council houses and ZIRP-subsidised mortgages are the preserve of older people while private renting is an expensive and under-regulated Wild West etc. Young people are only going to get more and more unsympathetic to demands to pay for goodies for others that they will never receive themselves.

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But when the discretionary housing payments stop will there be a mass exodus of LHA tenants from London? How long does a £130 million pound subsidy to landlords of those affected last? The changes came in at the beginning of 2012 and by now all tenants would be affected. Yet the only parts of London that have lost LHA tenants are the ones in the centre and even there rents have not budged.

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I am not trying to be patronising but I do think that a majority of young people born, say, after 1979 are more apathetic than previous young people. I also think that it has been deliberate policy to make young people more apathetic as part of the process of eliminating the attitudes of the post war upstarts who just didn't know their place. Unless things change big time, the period from 1945-1980 will be looked upon by future generations as a one off time in history when the natural order of things was turned upside down until those who run things got their act together and stamped it out so that things could return to 'normal'.

It's more cyclical than that. Good times and fortunate generations come and go. The post-war era was reinforced by idealism and the "all in it together" legacy of war, by the "white heat of technology" improving living standards, and by the "dead mens shoes" career ladder. That of course had comprehensively fallen apart by 1980. But after another decade rebuilding the economy we had another installment of partytime as the 'gap year' generation became the crest of the next wave. Another peak generation may even now be in our kindergartens or thereabouts.

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It's more cyclical than that. Good times and fortunate generations come and go. The post-war era was reinforced by idealism and the "all in it together" legacy of war, by the "white heat of technology" improving living standards, and by the "dead mens shoes" career ladder. That of course had comprehensively fallen apart by 1980. But after another decade rebuilding the economy we had another installment of partytime as the 'gap year' generation became the crest of the next wave. Another peak generation may even now be in our kindergartens or thereabouts.

Those of us who went on gap years found that the housing market had accelerated out of our reach by the time we got back. It's the bunch before us (the last cohort of free university who bought cheap in the late 90s) who really lucked out.

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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