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Economic Recovery Being Held Back By High Housing Costs

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'Economic recovery being held back' as high house prices and rents mean businesses struggle to attract workers

By HARRY GLASS

'Our economic recovery is being held back because there aren't enough homes in England today, and this lack of homes has pushed up prices and rents beyond people's reach,' said National Housing Federation director Gill Payne.

'As a result, businesses are finding it tough to attract workers and expand because many people can't buy a home or would struggle to pay high rents.

'If things don't change, employers will simply move - potentially out of the country - taking away desperately needed jobs.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail...l#ixzz2Ut0ke9zj

Edited by sleeping dog

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NHBF simply want to build more flats and dogboxes to be sold at the highest possible prices thus lining their pockets.

They do not have any track record of wanting to build:

1. Proper sized homes (note I say home not house) that people will stay in, raise families and become a part of a community.

2. Homes with adequate gardens for children and adults to use. Postage stamp sized plots all the way to maximise profit.

3. Decent build quality homes that don't require high maintenance as that would also cut into profit.

4. Proper road building and parking solutions to the current and expected volumes of car ownership. Tiny Austin Seven sized garages and single/no driveways all too often thus causing neighbour parking wars and dangers to all concerned.

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NHBF simply want to build more flats and dogboxes to be sold at the highest possible prices thus lining their pockets.

They do not have any track record of wanting to build:

1. Proper sized homes (note I say home not house) that people will stay in, raise families and become a part of a community.

2. Homes with adequate gardens for children and adults to use. Postage stamp sized plots all the way to maximise profit.

3. Decent build quality homes that don't require high maintenance as that would also cut into profit.

4. Proper road building and parking solutions to the current and expected volumes of car ownership. Tiny Austin Seven sized garages and single/no driveways all too often thus causing neighbour parking wars and dangers to all concerned.

These problems are much more a consequence of our planning policies. Remember that before the 1947 act, private builders were building exactly what the buyers wanted: those London suburbs semis.

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These problems are much more a consequence of our planning policies. Remember that before the 1947 act, private builders were building exactly what the buyers wanted: those London suburbs semis.

The sad thing about the act was that it was meant to encourage support for building by calming people's concerns. And, for added irony(?), it was the war that made 'the countryside' such a big deal. For patriotic purposes, rural England was idealised during the war as the England we were fighting for (industrialised urban England was considered too ugly to serve as a rallying cry).

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The sad thing about the act was that it was meant to encourage support for building by calming people's concerns. And, for added irony(?), it was the war that made 'the countryside' such a big deal. For patriotic purposes, rural England was idealised during the war as the England we were fighting for (industrialised urban England was considered too ugly to serve as a rallying cry).

So THAT was the reason! Wow. Thanks T&L. I've been wondering for quite some time what was at the root of this crazy fetishisation of the countryside.

BTW, the opening of the Olympic ceremony was particularly sickening.

And the biggest irony is that it was the British industry who built the spitfires, not country pumpkins!

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Home owners feel wealthy when their houses are overpriced, thats what politicians believe. I wish there was somewhere like Australia to send all this stupid boomers to.

Spain?

Problem is it's just as short a distance back as it is to send them.

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"The average house price in England for a first-time buyer in 2012 was £173,185, a recent National Housing Federation found. By 2020, this will increase by 42 per cent to £245,165. Rents are set to rise by around 6 per cent a year as interest rates and house prices rise. In 2018, private rents are predicted to be 32 per cent more than they are today."

:blink:

:lol:

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"The average house price in England for a first-time buyer in 2012 was £173,185, a recent National Housing Federation found. By 2020, this will increase by 42 per cent to £245,165. Rents are set to rise by around 6 per cent a year as interest rates and house prices rise. In 2018, private rents are predicted to be 32 per cent more than they are today."

:blink:

:lol:

But I have every faith that wages will rise in proportion, that by 2020 there will be no such thing as zero hour contracts, that anyone in work will be able to pay their rent without recourse to benefits.

Then I woke up from my dream and realised that the government of any colour will favour chancers, spivs and fraudsters above the ordinary electorate. Jail a plumber for accepting a few cash in hand jobs, meanwhile allow multinational companies to avoid billions in tax because they took HMRC staff out for lobster and Bolly.

Whatever you do, don't let the plebs live cheaply: if they don't like the absurd and insecure rental laws, they must buy an extremely overpriced house or flat and hock themselves deeply with a bank for between 25-40 years. But they're still meant to be 'flexible', meaning work with no security or rights and follow jobs wherever they are. Contradictorily, creditors take a dim view of this.

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'Our economic recovery is being held back because there aren't enough homes in England today, and this lack of homes has pushed up prices and rents beyond people's reach,' said National Housing Federation director Gill Payne.

'As a result, businesses are finding it tough to attract workers and expand because many people can't buy a home or would struggle to pay high rents.

'If things don't change, employers will simply move - potentially out of the country - taking away desperately needed jobs.'

I'm surprised that someone in her position seems to have forgotten that Housing Benefit is subsidising those employers quite nicely thank you.

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The right message but the wrong conclusion, from yet another govt teat sucker.

'In stark contrast, housing is now the most affordable for first-time buyers for a decade, mortgage rates are at their lowest for 14 years, and home-buying costs have fallen by a third over the past four years.

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The right message but the wrong conclusion, from yet another govt teat sucker.

'In stark contrast, housing is now the most affordable for first-time buyers for a decade, mortgage rates are at their lowest for 14 years, and home-buying costs have fallen by a third over the past four years.

"home-buying costs"? :unsure:

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Edit my mistak, that was Wendy Evans-Scott.

--------

Is this the same lady who gave one of the best car-crash interviews oon Newsnight(?) a while back? Smartphone prevents me from easily finding the piece (Andrew Lilico + Kirsty Wark were also there IIRC). Well worth a watch if the same lady.

Edited by cheeznbreed

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The article still doesn't identify the real problem that property and land is just too expensive which reflects in the price of almost everything UK.

It's basically just the builders wanting the opportunity to build more houses and sell them at the current expensive prices or even more expensive.

That'll do absolutely nothing for the overall general economy - and aren't they going to be filling any gaps in demand for housing with more cheap loans and more new settlers from overseas.

As for

'If things don't change, employers will simply move - potentially out of the country - taking away desperately needed jobs.'

They're having a laugh aren't they - that fox has been and gone already but they aren't doing much to stop it's regular repeat visits to take whatever scraps are left.

Then:

'Economic recovery being held back' as high house prices and rents mean businesses struggle to attract workers

Before BTL people were told that BTL would solve the problem of mobility for people wanting mobility between jobs in different places in the UK. It would allow people to take up jobs and easily move from place to place. Now it's just build more houses.

As for "struggling to attract workers" that doesn't ring true when there are so many applicants for each job including graduate jobs.

http://

www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-18694748

Every graduate post 'receives 52 applications'

Not that the UK doesn't need more houses but the article doesn't really get down to the core problems of the UK economy and the basic issue that property and land is too expensive - because of cheap money and now with taxpayers' money guaranteeing banks' security (and solvency).

A revised headline something like:

'Economic recovery being held back' as high house prices and rents mean businesses struggle to attract workers UK businesses are uncompetitive worldwide.

would be nearer the truth.

Edited by billybong

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I'm surprised that someone in her position seems to have forgotten that Housing Benefit is subsidising those employers quite nicely thank you.

This is a very important point.

We could say that being eligible for housing benefit is now a "key skill" required by employers.

Crazy.

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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