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Glasto Glut:250 Hours Of Bbc Coverage By 300 Staff

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Fine with me. Means I don't have to fork out £150 for a ticket, run the risk of catching diptheria in the toilets, and actually get to hear/see the bands (rather than have them blocked out by teenagers holding up their iphones and chatting).

We have blanket coverage of major sporting events and all the royal family nonsense - don't see why they can't cater to us music fans in the same way.

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Fine with me. Means I don't have to fork out £150 for a ticket, run the risk of catching diptheria in the toilets, and actually get to hear/see the bands (rather than have them blocked out by teenagers holding up their iphones and chatting).

We have blanket coverage of major sporting events and all the royal family nonsense - don't see why they can't cater to us music fans in the same way.

Except that you are forking out £150 for a ticket (or £145.50 to be exact) along with everyone else in the country.

Why does the BBC need to provide streaming coverage on the Internet. The festival can't do that themselves? The technology has only been around for 20 years. The BBC is most likely paying for the rights to this, but all they're really doing is providing free PR for a bunch of rock dinosaurs who most definitely do not need any more money.

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Why does the BBC need to provide streaming coverage on the Internet. The festival can't do that themselves? The technology has only been around for 20 years. The BBC is most likely paying for the rights to this, but all they're really doing is providing free PR for a bunch of rock dinosaurs who most definitely do not need any more money.

Really? Seems to me what they're doing is their job - providing me with stuff I want to watch.

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Been to Glastonbury three times for five days each time. 14 days of rain and only one of sunshine. The day of sunshine was fun and glorious. The rest was an unremitting trudge through mud, no-where to sit, permanently damp clothes and an altogether miserable experience, despite some fantastic bands. I will enjoy watching from the comfort of my own home.

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The North Korean Broadcasting Corporation manage to inform, educate and entertain on a budget of £2M a year.

Great. Well, you lobby for 250 hours of Kim Jong-Un saluting if you want - I'll stick with 250 hours of bands thanks.

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The North Korean Broadcasting Corporation manage to inform, educate and entertain on a budget of £2M a year.

Have you seen their entertainment..?

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The purpose of Glastonbury is to illustrate to us soft 21st Century urbanites that we'd die like flies if deprived of modern civilisation for more than a week. In a post-apocalyptic UK, society would quickly break down and we'd drown in our own filth - and the BBC would no doubt be there to cover the scenes of pestilence and Medieval squalor from the vantage point of a luxury winnebago with a proper toilet. It's what the Beeb has been doing in the Third World hellholes for decades. Glasto is just a disaster zone with a sound track.

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Except that you are forking out £150 for a ticket (or £145.50 to be exact) along with everyone else in the country.

Why does the BBC need to provide streaming coverage on the Internet. The festival can't do that themselves? The technology has only been around for 20 years. The BBC is most likely paying for the rights to this, but all they're really doing is providing free PR for a bunch of rock dinosaurs who most definitely do not need any more money.

Inflation chap, it`s now £216 including booking fee /P&P

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Isn't there any want to protest this crap?

Just don't watch it. The viewing figures will judge it. I suspect it will be very poplar.

300 staff for a week producing 3 whole days worth of television (probably more) probably works out at pretty good value to money compared to producing many of the other shows. Imagine how many people it takes to film EastEnders, and that's only a few hours a week.

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Except that you are forking out £150 for a ticket (or £145.50 to be exact) along with everyone else in the country.

You don't have to buy a license. Streaming services have finally come of age and are a decent alternative. Plus you can watch all the catch up and listen to the radio without a license.

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Inflation chap, it`s now £216 including booking fee /P&P

Glastonbury is a good analogy for the BBC itself; they pretend to be egalitarian, 'street', wiv it, and down with the kids, but they're actually overpriced, left leaning and staffed by the wealthy middle class. The analogy only goes so far though as you won't get threatening letters from Michael Eavis if you don't subscribe to their service (although I guess he's happy to take the BBC shilling, so they may do it on his behalf).

Getting a slot on 'Team Glasto' must be a plumb posting for a BBC staffer. It must be up there with a US election, or a major sporting event in a hot distant place. Hence one reason why there's so many of the buggers there

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You don't have to buy a license. Streaming services have finally come of age and are a decent alternative. Plus you can watch all the catch up and listen to the radio without a license.

If you are viewing a stream as it is being broadcast (i.e. not on a catchup service) , you need a license.

Tellies don't come into it.

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Cheap as chips is my guess as to why there's so much coverage.

250 hours for £2m comes out at just £16,000 an hour.

About 100 times cheaper than say a period drama.

Not sure what the OP is complaining about.

If you don't like it don't watch it. But don't pretend the BBC would save money if they filled the airtime with something else.

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250 hours for £2m comes out at just £16,000 an hour.

Yep. It's cheap air time and TV, especially per capita, which is probably one reason why the BBC are doing it. Clever move. Won't be watching though as I don't have a TV.

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If you are viewing a stream as it is being broadcast (i.e. not on a catchup service) , you need a license.

Tellies don't come into it.

Yes. I was talking about the likes of Lovefilm, Netflix and Mubi (and more). Plenty of entertainment out there. It's a question of how much you want what each service has to offer. The TV license is an oppressive dinosaur and people should start voting with their feet/wallet.

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Been to Glastonbury three times for five days each time. 14 days of rain and only one of sunshine. The day of sunshine was fun and glorious. The rest was an unremitting trudge through mud, no-where to sit, permanently damp clothes and an altogether miserable experience, despite some fantastic bands. I will enjoy watching from the comfort of my own home.

I survived the 2 very wet ones in the late 90s in my teens & went back a 3rd time a couple of years later. For the wet ones, I took wellies, extra groundsheets, a car full of chopped up pallets for dry firewood and made all my mates trek right up the hill past the shower blocks to camp, we were fine and dry/clean. The camping down at main stage level looked fully miserable mind!

I find the whole mainstream nature of Glastonbury these days a bit of a turn-off, but I do sometimes consider going to another one.

Edited by looking for the out

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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