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Venger

32 Year Old Nhs Director On £250K A Year

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WTH. £250K a year at 32 working at the NHS.

2008 I had to hear stories of NHS managers going on an all-paid jolly to USA.

Alexander boasts in his profile on professional networking site LinkedIn that he is: ‘An experienced turnaround and operations director working at both strategic and operational level.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2333207/Craig-Alexander-NHS-director-250-000-sacked-job-disgruntled-worker-discovered-robbed-shop-gunpoint.html

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WTH. £250K a year at 32 working at the NHS.

2008 I had to hear stories of NHS managers going on an all-paid jolly to USA.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2333207/Craig-Alexander-NHS-director-250-000-sacked-job-disgruntled-worker-discovered-robbed-shop-gunpoint.html

To be fair, he's got a 'social science certificate' from the Open University. (Presumably when he was in prison.)

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WTH. £250K a year at 32 working at the NHS.

2008 I had to hear stories of NHS managers going on an all-paid jolly to USA.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2333207/Craig-Alexander-NHS-director-250-000-sacked-job-disgruntled-worker-discovered-robbed-shop-gunpoint.html

If this is true then I think it is about time that Mr Cameron took a proper look at the NHS. Regardless of the history/qualifications of the person mentioned the only person on such a high salary in the NHS should possibly be the Director and possibly a few of the more experienced consultants. As is pointed out on this site many times - the costs here are not just related to the take home salary but also the rather generous pension and other perks.

The problem is that if the NHS has to accept cuts it is people in positions like this who will hang onto their jobs and the lower paid that will be targeted.

At my place of work a few years ago we were told that there was a high chance of lay offs as the budgets were no longer adding up - in the end I think all that were removed were two part time cleaners (not only saving eff all money but expecting the remaining cleaners to cover for the missing staff).

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If this is true then I think it is about time that Mr Cameron took a proper look at the NHS. Regardless of the history/qualifications of the person mentioned the only person on such a high salary in the NHS should possibly be the Director and possibly a few of the more experienced consultants. As is pointed out on this site many times - the costs here are not just related to the take home salary but also the rather generous pension and other perks.

The problem is that if the NHS has to accept cuts it is people in positions like this who will hang onto their jobs and the lower paid that will be targeted.

At my place of work a few years ago we were told that there was a high chance of lay offs as the budgets were no longer adding up - in the end I think all that were removed were two part time cleaners (not only saving eff all money but expecting the remaining cleaners to cover for the missing staff).

That's why they did where i work too.Oh and they also removed all the bins in the building and installed a recycling bin on the top floor. I'm sure the savings are tremendous.

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This story is full crap.

He was contracting, and that salary is very normal for London.

I think you'll find that the majority of contractors in London are equally full of crap.

If Britain were to ever do a full check on folks backgrounds you'd see that perhaps 1/20 of the folk actually have been truthful AND are qualified to take the job, staff or contract.

Britain is a nation of liars, all punching well above their weight. One only need to look at the debt load of the average Blighty inhabitant right through to parliament.

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This story is full crap.

He was contracting, and that salary is very normal for London.

I think you'll find that the majority of contractors in London are equally full of crap.

If Britain were to ever do a full check on folks backgrounds you'd see that perhaps 1/20 of the folk actually have been truthful AND are qualified to take the job, staff or contract.

Britain is a nation of liars, all punching well above their weight. One only need to look at the debt load of the average Blighty inhabitant right through to parliament.

I am sure I have seen well paid "contractors" who both lied a lot, and weren't that good! HR do not check! :huh:

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It's high time all employers reviewed their staff's job applications and checked they were truthful.

Anyone found to have been lying beyond what I'd describe as sales puff should be immediately sacked an their historic pay recovered - especially if they are a banker.

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It's high time all employers reviewed their staff's job applications and checked they were truthful.

Anyone found to have been lying beyond what I'd describe as sales puff should be immediately sacked an their historic pay recovered - especially if they are a banker.

trouble is how do you check? in th uk when hiring, previous employers tend to limit themselves to a simple "worked here 2009-2011". anything more and the lawyers are hovering......

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This story is full crap.

He was contracting, and that salary is very normal for London.

I think you'll find that the majority of contractors in London are equally full of crap.

If Britain were to ever do a full check on folks backgrounds you'd see that perhaps 1/20 of the folk actually have been truthful AND are qualified to take the job, staff or contract.

Britain is a nation of liars, all punching well above their weight. One only need to look at the debt load of the average Blighty inhabitant right through to parliament.

I once took on an angineer to develop and roll out a new mobile data service (one which, incidentally, I had previously rolled out myself for the competitor of the company). The guy was slow, no initiative, and spent a lot of the time crawling to me instead of impressing me with actually doing a job.

I recently found his profile on LinkedIn. Apparently he has been the founder of lots of successful startups, was in a position superior to mine where I engaged him, and pioneered the technology I was trying to get him to produce in response to what was already on the market. :rolleyes:

I used to help companies look for VC, a role which attracts scammers, no-hopers and fantasists like flies (see Dragon's Den). My fraudster antennae have become much finer-tuned as a result.

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If the guy has done his time, then that's it - he's paid his debt to society.

The NHS salary is down to the people you vote for.

I detest that phrase.

Imprisonment is not 'paying a debt' in any sense, unless it is to sate society's appetite for revenge on a criminal, which I feel is an inappropriate reason for punishment in a civilised society.

Wthout wanting to sound pious, I genuinely feel that 'doing time' has only worked if the prisoner repents for what they have done (rather than just feel sorry for themselves).

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Wthout wanting to sound pious, I genuinely feel that 'doing time' has only worked if the prisoner repents for what they have done (rather than just feel sorry for themselves).

Ah, but the longer you lock him up for, the more chance you have of having him incarcerated on the day he chooses to repent.

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trouble is how do you check? in th uk when hiring, previous employers tend to limit themselves to a simple "worked here 2009-2011". anything more and the lawyers are hovering......

I don't know if this is something that goes on elsewhere, but there is a "standard NHS reference" format which has to be followed if applying for an NHS job, or at least a senior post.

Essentially, every time I've applied recently, the referee gets a 3 page tick-box form, asking about stuff like "has X ever been subject to disciplinary proceedings?", "Is X suitable for this job?", etc. Certainly, when I've applied, it's been written in capitals on the application form "REFERENCE FORMS MUST BE FULLY COMPLETED. INCOMPLETE FORMS WILL BE DISCARDED. CANDIDATES WILL NOT BE INTERVIEWED UNLESS THE INTERVIEW PANEL HAS THREE FULLY-COMPLETED REFERENCE FORMS PRIOR TO THE TIME OF INTERVIEW".

As it turned out, one of my referees had sent the forms by fax a 5pm before he left for a 3-week holiday. The fax had arrived corrupted, with one page illegible. HR at the new site had contacted the referee but was told he was on holiday and that was that. So, when I turned up for the interview, I was told when I showed up at reception that I was not going to be interviewed as they had not received the requisite number of references, and that was the end of that job opportunity.

I did make a formal complaint about that, but was simply told, "It was made clear on the application forms that references had to be received in full by time of interview. It is not the job of the HR department to chase up candidates who have failed to complete the application process."

I can only assume that the selection process for contractors is rather less rigorous.

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I don't know if this is something that goes on elsewhere, but there is a "standard NHS reference" format which has to be followed if applying for an NHS job, or at least a senior post.

Essentially, every time I've applied recently, the referee gets a 3 page tick-box form, asking about stuff like "has X ever been subject to disciplinary proceedings?", "Is X suitable for this job?", etc. Certainly, when I've applied, it's been written in capitals on the application form "REFERENCE FORMS MUST BE FULLY COMPLETED. INCOMPLETE FORMS WILL BE DISCARDED. CANDIDATES WILL NOT BE INTERVIEWED UNLESS THE INTERVIEW PANEL HAS THREE FULLY-COMPLETED REFERENCE FORMS PRIOR TO THE TIME OF INTERVIEW".

As it turned out, one of my referees had sent the forms by fax a 5pm before he left for a 3-week holiday. The fax had arrived corrupted, with one page illegible. HR at the new site had contacted the referee but was told he was on holiday and that was that. So, when I turned up for the interview, I was told when I showed up at reception that I was not going to be interviewed as they had not received the requisite number of references, and that was the end of that job opportunity.

I did make a formal complaint about that, but was simply told, "It was made clear on the application forms that references had to be received in full by time of interview. It is not the job of the HR department to chase up candidates who have failed to complete the application process."

I can only assume that the selection process for contractors is rather less rigorous.

I would assume that the contractor referencee is less rigorous, particularly if the contractor is trading through a company; technically the reference would be for the company.

The NHS may have grounds to take legal action against the agency, if it failed itself to check references. It seems that in this story, the NHS is continuing to deal with the agency that supplied the contractor. One more example of the pointlessness of customers insisting on dealing with contractors through agents.

What strikes me as disturbing is that a senior position was filled with a temporary 'employee' for such a long period.

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I would assume that the contractor referencee is less rigorous, particularly if the contractor is trading through a company; technically the reference would be for the company.

The NHS may have grounds to take legal action against the agency, if it failed itself to check references. It seems that in this story, the NHS is continuing to deal with the agency that supplied the contractor. One more example of the pointlessness of customers insisting on dealing with contractors through agents.

This guy was in a senior management role. He wasn't just someone the agency sent over with a particular skill-set. Regardless of the mechanism for paying him he would have been interviewed directly by the NHS.

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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