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RichB

Fruit Juice

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In the supermarket some fruit juice is displayed in all its glory in the fridge. Well lit, chilled, and super fresh.

Other stuff is kept in dark dank corners of the shop on shelves that appear to be deliberately covered in dust. Much of it appears to be the same, perhaps some slightly cheaper packaging...

What is the difference - other than about 30-50% on the price?

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In the supermarket some fruit juice is displayed in all its glory in the fridge. Well lit, chilled, and super fresh.

Other stuff is kept in dark dank corners of the shop on shelves that appear to be deliberately covered in dust. Much of it appears to be the same, perhaps some slightly cheaper packaging...

What is the difference - other than about 30-50% on the price?

Bit like the difference between fresh and UHT milk.......I now buy both uht milk and 100% fruit juice in cartons that are not kept in the fridge. ;)

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In the supermarket some fruit juice is displayed in all its glory in the fridge. Well lit, chilled, and super fresh.

Other stuff is kept in dark dank corners of the shop on shelves that appear to be deliberately covered in dust. Much of it appears to be the same, perhaps some slightly cheaper packaging...

What is the difference - other than about 30-50% on the price?

:lol:

You've noticed that too. My local Sainsburys has long life stuff happily co-existing and intermingled with the freshly squeezed.

The only difference afaict with the ambient stuff covered in what appears to be finely powdered animal droppings is the branding.

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Bit like the difference between fresh and UHT milk.......I now buy both uht milk and 100% fruit juice in cartons that are not kept in the fridge. ;)

That's what I used to think... but looking at the ingredients I am not quite so sure now...

Take the cranberry juice that prompted this thread.

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Ocean-Spray-Cranberry-Classic/12643011?from=search&tags=|20000&param=cranberry&parentContainer=SEARCHcranberry_SHELFVIEW

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Ocean-Spray-Chilled-Original-Cranberry-Juice-Drink/15807011?from=shop&tags=|20000|20002|40619|40624|40631|41062&parentContainer=|20002|40619|40624|40631_SHELFVIEW

Contains 3% cranberry puree as well as the other stuff... overall more sugars, which bumps it up from £1.30 to £2 something in the shop I was in this morning...

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That's what I used to think... but looking at the ingredients I am not quite so sure now...

Take the cranberry juice that prompted this thread.

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Ocean-Spray-Cranberry-Classic/12643011?from=search&tags=|20000&param=cranberry&parentContainer=SEARCHcranberry_SHELFVIEW

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Ocean-Spray-Chilled-Original-Cranberry-Juice-Drink/15807011?from=shop&tags=|20000|20002|40619|40624|40631|41062&parentContainer=|20002|40619|40624|40631_SHELFVIEW

Contains 3% cranberry puree as well as the other stuff... overall more sugars, which bumps it up from £1.30 to £2 something in the shop I was in this morning...

I generally only buy fruit juice to ferment into hooch. So sugars are something I look at. Comparing Sainsburys label chilled 'that which need not be chilled' with its unchilled competition I haven't registered much difference in starting gravity.

edit: I just checked - for eg. an extra 14g/litre difference (91g vs 105g) between Basics and Standard JS OJ. Call it 1.4p's worth of sugar

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Cranberry juice drinks are a special case as no-one can drink the real juice, it's too bitter, so they're always sugary mixes of one form or another.

For other juices, the main differences are whether they're made from concentrate or not and whether they're pasteurised and can be stored at room temp.

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I generally only buy fruit juice to ferment into hooch. So sugars are something I look at. Comparing Sainsburys label chilled 'that which need not be chilled' with its unchilled competition I haven't registered much difference in starting gravity.

edit: I just checked - for eg. an extra 14g/litre difference (91g vs 105g) between Basics and Standard JS OJ. Call it 1.4p's worth of sugar

I read it was necessary to get the fresh stuff to make a wine out of it! Maybe the book was wrong?

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I read it was necessary to get the fresh stuff to make a wine out of it! Maybe the book was wrong?

Fresh not essential.

Not nuked with stabilisers or other additives essential.

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Fresh not essential.

Not nuked with stabilisers or other additives essential.

Sounds sensible!

2 litres of orange and one of apple makes a gallon of white wine! Very simple, very successful! I never had much luck making beer, but wine seems to work. ;)

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... so some 'juice drinks' as opposed to just 'juice' are out, as is anything with that non fermentable, artificial sweetener cr*p in it

Ribena cordial's apparently a goer though.

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... so some 'juice drinks' as opposed to just 'juice' are out, as is anything with that non fermentable, artificial sweetener cr*p in it

Ribena cordial's apparently a goer though.

I might experiment with that! I don't think "Sunny D" would work. :lol:

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Sounds sensible!

2 litres of orange and one of apple makes a gallon of white wine! Very simple, very successful! I never had much luck making beer, but wine seems to work. ;)

or even 1 litre orange juice, 1 litre of white grape juice and just under a kilo of sugar. Though, as discussed on a recent thread, the white grape juice is not as easy to come by as it once was.

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That's what I used to think... but looking at the ingredients I am not quite so sure now...

Take the cranberry juice that prompted this thread.

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Ocean-Spray-Cranberry-Classic/12643011?from=search&tags=|20000&param=cranberry&parentContainer=SEARCHcranberry_SHELFVIEW

http://www.ocado.com/webshop/product/Ocean-Spray-Chilled-Original-Cranberry-Juice-Drink/15807011?from=shop&tags=|20000|20002|40619|40624|40631|41062&parentContainer=|20002|40619|40624|40631_SHELFVIEW

Contains 3% cranberry puree as well as the other stuff... overall more sugars, which bumps it up from £1.30 to £2 something in the shop I was in this morning...

Ingredients:

Water, cranberry juice from concentrate (22%), glucose-fructose syrup, sugar, cranberry purée (3%), vitamin C.

The main ingredient is water, then packed with extra sugar, why add vit c to a fruit juice?....just had a look at the ingredients on my 'simply', 'basic' 'value' white tetra style packaged brand of orange juice nothing added nor taken away " Orange juice from concentrate. fruit content 100%. no artificial flavourings preservatives or colours. ;)

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My teabag wine is looking fine. ;)

That's for the tannin!

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I would just stick with eating real fruit, so you get some fibre with the fructose

You get that with freshly squeezed, the made from concentrate stuff does in deed lack fibre.

I drink the latter but only one small glass a day.

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Bit like the difference between fresh and UHT milk.......I now buy both uht milk and 100% fruit juice in cartons that are not kept in the fridge. ;)

The beauty with UHT milk is that it doesn't go off and you can buy it in bulk, dispensing with expensive deliveries, though it is killing the milkman off no doubt. If we ever get a voucher for say spend thirty quid before x and get £6 quid off, I will get a load of UHT milk. Lidl also sometimes has them at half price say 26p a litre as opposed to 53p (the price of skimmed). Again a bulk buying opportunity.

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The beauty with UHT milk is that it doesn't go off and you can buy it in bulk, dispensing with expensive deliveries, though it is killing the milkman off no doubt. If we ever get a voucher for say spend thirty quid before x and get £6 quid off, I will get a load of UHT milk. Lidl also sometimes has them at half price say 26p a litre as opposed to 53p (the price of skimmed). Again a bulk buying opportunity.

Yes but doesn't it taste horrible. I prefer to pay a little more for milk that tastes better.

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You get that with freshly squeezed, the made from concentrate stuff does in deed lack fibre.

Not necessarily. If they filter out all the 'bits' then freshly squeezed juice can be just as bad.

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Yes but doesn't it taste horrible. I prefer to pay a little more for milk that tastes better.

You get used to whatever you eat and drink, like not having sugar in tea and if you do it is sugared water. All I can taste in full fat milk now is the fat.

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Ingredients:

The main ingredient is water, then packed with extra sugar, why add vit c to a fruit juice?....just had a look at the ingredients on my 'simply', 'basic' 'value' white tetra style packaged brand of orange juice nothing added nor taken away " Orange juice from concentrate. fruit content 100%. no artificial flavourings preservatives or colours. ;)

Vitamin C is destroyed at high temperatures. It's probably been through some high temperature industrial process that took out most of it so they added it back in since everyone expects vitamin C in their fruit based drink.

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I would just stick with eating real fruit, so you get some fibre with the fructose

I'm trying to cut back on sugar, on advice of the dentist, to help maintain the health of my teeth. Rest of family is doing the same.

I now know crushing fruit releases more sugars than eating fruit whole, but that's not convenient when want liquid refreshment.

Drinking more milk now (mixed with regular water) but milk is also high in sugar, although the lactose type of sugar which is a lot less damaging to teeth.

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On the subject of premiums on fruity products that are (virtually) identical,

A couple of the women in my life have developed a taste for premium-priced Pink Lady® apples. There is no such breed of apple as Pink Lady®...

Perhaps more than any other modern apple, Pink Lady® epitomises the trend towards product marketing and branding in the sale of apples. Pink Lady® was one of the first apples to be marketed under a specific brand name rather than by its variety name. The variety is grown under licence, and then marketed through licenced resellers to the supermarkets. This tight control is intended to keep quality high, and it is portrayed as a premium product.

You may have sometimes seen another variety called Cripps Pink in the shops and noticed the similarity ... it is actually the same variety. Pink Lady® is a trademark, the actual variety name is Cripps Pink. In order to preserve the premium appeal of Pink Lady®, about 65% of the production which does not meet the standards required for Pink Lady® is sold as Cripps Pink instead. The distinction is primarily made on colour intensity and the sugar/acid balance.

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  • 239 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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