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Court Bailiff Attempts To Evict


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Last data I've found for the house, although no idea if a transaction went through, or it's being held back off the market and due to come back on again. Includes 7 acres.

Asking price £915,000, 4 bedrooms, Detached,

This property is a repossession and has been made secure. In order to do this almost all the windows and some of the doors have been removed with metal shutters fitted in their place.

http://www.mousepric...le/ref-22954592

Edit to add: http://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-36982921.html

Edited by Venger
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Maybe if the banks had lent responsibly in the first place none of this may have happened.

It's possible that it was the banking crisis created by the bank have lead to the owner not being able to pay his mortgage.

Edited by gf3
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Maybe if the banks had lent responsibly in the first place none of this may have happened.

It's possible that it was the banking crisis created by the bank have lead to the owner not being able to pay his mortgage.

Two sides to that equation of blame, and it required willing borrowers. It's happened time and time and time before. Lenders pulled the plug on lending. Look at Serpico. Go back hundreds of years further and same thing. If people can't learn that prices don't continually go up and leave themselves exposed to big debt, that's their own fault. If there had been no 'crisis' there'd be no chance of a house price crash at all. Millions of people would be worse off. Just older people seeing their homes x3 every few years. There are limits.

The People Vs The Banks? They bought a house for £1.15 million.

Many of us have waited for years as prices continued to inflate because of such borrowers. The debtors' battle, in the title and the video, didn't give any indication they were thinking of those people priced out waiting for value, or younger people coming through.

The tall guy who held up the bailiffs automatically assumed all the police in attendance had mortgages. That he was defending against the system on their behalf. The enemy of the borrowers in this video, who want to be considered heroes, are people wanting lower prices.

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Yup. Exactly. 100% spot on.

Fred "the shred" Goodwin pension pot = £16 million

Bob diamond total remuneration 2007-2012 = £120 million

Senior bankers jailed for PPI & Libor fraud = 0

Senior HSBC bankers for money laundering drug cartel money = 0

The list goes on and on.

It's an abysmal failure of those involved to pay for their mistakes. But I'm glad your in wholehearted agreement.

Indeed, it's the trickle down effect. "These ba$tards stole millions and walked away, why should I pay OR walk away"? As posted, expect a lot more of this

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As soon as I spotted the Court Bailiffs were fat and had shaved heads to make them look hard I knew what was going to happen. :)

Did any of them have Tattoos I never noticed. :unsure:

At least the Police Sergeant Mo was correctly dressed wearing his hat. ;)

Edited by Charlie The Tramp Returns
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From what the scouse guy was saying it sounded like somebody refusing to leave voluntarily could still be evicted lawfully but a different warrant would be required. I'm not sure who would have the authority to forcibly remove the occupier though. The police?

I'm glad the police stopped the bailiff from behaving illegally but it's hard to escape the idea that if you haven't paid your mortgage you're going to lose the house eventually by some mechanism. This principle is the bedrock of the UK financial system so the authorities are hardly going to let it disappear thanks to a clever legal argument. I guess you could drag it out for years if an Act of Parliament was required but they would get you in the end.

Still, if it was to turn out that mortgage payments are optional in the UK it would be interesting to watch the financial markets price this information in!

Oh yeah, I'm with you 100%- don't pay then leave. I've no sympathy for the financial plight of the owners, they agreed to cough up an absurd sum for a gaff. I hope they are pursued for the shortfall within the bounds of the law.

But, thugs like the ones on the video are clearly used to throwing their weight around and getting away with it in their usual working duties. Swearing, smoking, intimidation, casually dressed, refusal to properly serve papers. There are few lines of work that people with such an attitude can make a living from, and it seems dispensing the wishes of an arm of the judicial system is one.

Yeah, I don't know enough about law to say whether the necessary paperwork to effect a forceable eviction is easy to obtain, but I'm very happy if people exercise their legal rights under the current system to send thugs packing.

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Two sides to that equation of blame, and it required willing borrowers. It's happened time and time and time before. Lenders pulled the plug on lending. Look at Serpico. Go back hundreds of years further and same thing. If people can't learn that prices don't continually go up and leave themselves exposed to big debt, that's their own fault. If there had been no 'crisis' there'd be no chance of a house price crash at all. Millions of people would be worse off. Just older people seeing their homes x3 every few years. There are limits.

The People Vs The Banks? They bought a house for £1.15 million.

Many of us have waited for years as prices continued to inflate because of such borrowers. The debtors' battle, in the title and the video, didn't give any indication they were thinking of those people priced out waiting for value, or younger people coming through.

The tall guy who held up the bailiffs automatically assumed all the police in attendance had mortgages. That he was defending against the system on their behalf. The enemy of the borrowers in this video, who want to be considered heroes, are people wanting lower prices.

Yes, the borrowers are tossers, and the video presentation is just made for whinging debt serfs by whinging debt serfs, but the balliffs hard man act was just bully boy tactics because they thought the big guy was a soft touch, they wouldn`t act like that around someone capable of doing them damage, the guy with the beer gut would be straight out of his depth the minute anyone capable of handling themselves turned up. Sad all round I thought.

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Eviction is necessary, these are the people who kept the responsible from being able to afford their own homes by fuelling the bubble paying more than they could afford. When it finally comes to a head I've no sympathy for how they are treated at all. The people vs the banks crap at the start is pathetic, how about living within your means, idiots.

What a dreadful and unsympathetic point of view. Do you not understand that people do not pay extortionate amounts of money for a roof over their heads because they want to, but because they have to? I dare say there are many who are forced to rent, as well as buy, at prices they cannot really afford. Do you think that they, too, are fuelling a bubble (in rental prices), and should be evicted without sympathy when they can no longer to pay their landlord? People have to live somewhere, and at the moment, no matter how frugal you are, or how simply you may house yourself, you will be paying more than you should for your accommodation. This is not a matter of choice, but of compulsion.

I have been homeless myself. Even though I never mortgaged my home for anywhere near the limit of my personal affordability, circumstances beyond my control forced me onto the street. I can tell you, first hand, that it is not much fun.

If you really have no sympathy for people who are thrown out of their homes in distressing circumstances, then you still have a great deal to learn about what makes a worthwhile and coherent society. There are a raft of posters on this site who seem to think that the answer to unaffordable housing is to punish those who have tried to buy a place to live. Baying for blood in a desperately divided and exploited land wont solve anything. Concern for others is what is needed.

May I end my post as you did...idiot.

Muggers.

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it required willing borrowers.

.........

Many of us have waited for years as prices continued to inflate because of such borrowers. The debtors' battle, in the title and the video, didn't give any indication they were thinking of those people priced out waiting for value, or younger people coming through.

Of course. It is ridiculous this was a 'people versus bankers' theme, it is the greedy and stupid wanting what they can't afford and whining when the bill arrives.

"Wah wah Im a victim the bankers did it"

If I drive my car off a cliff is that the fault of the car salesman?

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There are a raft of posters on this site who seem to think that the answer to unaffordable housing is to punish those who have tried to buy a place to live.

The answer to unaffordable housing is lower prices. Everyone who paid the stupid asking prices contributed to punishing people themselves by keeping prices high out of reach of those with more sense.

The crisis will have victims. Who should they be? Those that kept out of the market and lived within their means or those that bought what they could not afford forcing out others?

Ive been evicted several times despite paying my bills simply because I was a tenant. It happens once to a 'homeowner' and we're all supposed to be aghast at what a terrible experience it must be. Diddums. The blame for this crisis lies nowhere near the priced out, it lies with the borrowers and the lenders, find yourself a more deserving target for your drivel.

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The answer to unaffordable housing is lower prices. Everyone who paid the stupid asking prices contributed to punishing people themselves by keeping prices high out of reach of those with more sense.

The crisis will have victims. Who should they be? Those that kept out of the market and lived within their means or those that bought what they could not afford forcing out others?

Ive been evicted several times despite paying my bills simply because I was a tenant. It happens once to a 'homeowner' and we're all supposed to be aghast at what a terrible experience it must be. Diddums. The blame for this crisis lies nowhere near the priced out, it lies with the borrowers and the lenders, find yourself a more deserving target for your drivel.

I think my drivel has found the most deserving of targets, if you dont mind me saying so. You will never understand the true reason why house prices are too high while you insist on trying to analyse the situation in terms of blame. What you write reeks of hypocracy. If you, like me, were an unindebted house owner, then you certainly would not be posting comments on HPC. I smell sour grapes.

Muggers

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If I drive my car off a cliff is that the fault of the car salesman?

No, its not the fault of the salesman.

However, if you are driving your car along the cliff edge, (itself a risky thing to do) and you see a sign which has been put up by the authorities, which says "Hey! Drive your car this way! Its a great road and at the end of it there is free parking, a wonderful view and cheap petrol" then you might be forgiven for thinking it is true.

As you road ends, and your car, hopefully with you in it, plunges over the cliff to its doom, will you still be saying, on the way down, it was the salesmans fault? We all follow the signs, dont we? Or are you different?

Muggers

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No, its not the fault of the salesman.

However, if you are driving your car along the cliff edge, (itself a risky thing to do) and you see a sign which has been put up by the authorities, which says "Hey! Drive your car this way! Its a great road and at the end of it there is free parking, a wonderful view and cheap petrol" then you might be forgiven for thinking it is true.

As you road ends, and your car, hopefully with you in it, plunges over the cliff to its doom, will you still be saying, on the way down, it was the salesmans fault? We all follow the signs, dont we? Or are you different?

Muggers

A poor analogy.

Some struggling individuals are doing so because they were reckless, pure and simple. It's one thing to avoid criticism when genuine misfortune has ocurred, but another to start making excuses for people who just were not thinking straight.

Double income required to service Interest-only borrowings = lunacy.

If you oppose zombie companies being propped up at the expense of new entrants who may make a better fist of it, then the same applies to housholds. It's brutal but necessary. It's the fairest system we have.

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No, its not the fault of the salesman.

However, if you are driving your car along the cliff edge, (itself a risky thing to do) and you see a sign which has been put up by the authorities, which says "Hey! Drive your car this way! Its a great road and at the end of it there is free parking, a wonderful view and cheap petrol" then you might be forgiven for thinking it is true.

As you road ends, and your car, hopefully with you in it, plunges over the cliff to its doom, will you still be saying, on the way down, it was the salesmans fault? We all follow the signs, dont we? Or are you different?

Muggers

I understand it's a $hit situation to be in, I doubt any long term poster on this site doesn't, but can I put another analogy to you.

If you get an e-mail from a Nigerian finance minister asking if he can donate £££££'s to your bank account, just so he can balance his books, would you supply your details? Of course you wouldn't, because you realise it's a scam. Yet thousands get done. Do you think we should have a national whip-round to give the victims their money back?

Most long term posters recognised the housing scam long before most, they feel their entitled to point at victims and shout "fool"! Given the length of time this bubble's been inflated, who can blame them?

Edited by AThirdWay
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What a dreadful and unsympathetic point of view. Do you not understand that people do not pay extortionate amounts of money for a roof over their heads because they want to, but because they have to? I dare say there are many who are forced to rent, as well as buy, at prices they cannot really afford. Do you think that they, too, are fuelling a bubble (in rental prices), and should be evicted without sympathy when they can no longer to pay their landlord? People have to live somewhere, and at the moment, no matter how frugal you are, or how simply you may house yourself, you will be paying more than you should for your accommodation. This is not a matter of choice, but of compulsion.

I have been homeless myself. Even though I never mortgaged my home for anywhere near the limit of my personal affordability, circumstances beyond my control forced me onto the street. I can tell you, first hand, that it is not much fun.

If you really have no sympathy for people who are thrown out of their homes in distressing circumstances, then you still have a great deal to learn about what makes a worthwhile and coherent society. There are a raft of posters on this site who seem to think that the answer to unaffordable housing is to punish those who have tried to buy a place to live. Baying for blood in a desperately divided and exploited land wont solve anything. Concern for others is what is needed.

May I end my post as you did...idiot.

Muggers.

Just got my rent down from 450 pm to 400pm, central Edinburgh, so what you are saying is not true across the country, 400pm is an almost neglible cost, worth it just for a place to sleep, but the landlord was concerned that I prove beyond doubt that I could pay, people have been struggling/wriggling recently they said. So the penny is dropping here, there is no money about, and rents are acting accordingly, the more of the over-extended that are turfed out, the sooner we can have the needed correction, not much sympathy from me I`m afraid, there will be some kind of shelter provided for them in the UK.

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snip

But, thugs like the ones on the video are clearly used to throwing their weight around and getting away with it in their usual working duties. Swearing, smoking, intimidation, casually dressed, refusal to properly serve papers. There are few lines of work that people with such an attitude can make a living from, and it seems dispensing the wishes of an arm of the judicial system is one.

Yeah, I don't know enough about law to say whether the necessary paperwork to effect a forceable eviction is easy to obtain, but I'm very happy if people exercise their legal rights under the current system to send thugs packing.

ex clampers no doubt....we spent years allowing these thugs to terrorise ordinary people...meanwhile, government did very little indeed.

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What a dreadful and unsympathetic point of view. Do you not understand that people do not pay extortionate amounts of money for a roof over their heads because they want to, but because they have to? I dare say there are many who are forced to rent, as well as buy, at prices they cannot really afford. Do you think that they, too, are fuelling a bubble (in rental prices), and should be evicted without sympathy when they can no longer to pay their landlord? People have to live somewhere, and at the moment, no matter how frugal you are, or how simply you may house yourself, you will be paying more than you should for your accommodation. This is not a matter of choice, but of compulsion.

I have been homeless myself. Even though I never mortgaged my home for anywhere near the limit of my personal affordability, circumstances beyond my control forced me onto the street. I can tell you, first hand, that it is not much fun.

If you really have no sympathy for people who are thrown out of their homes in distressing circumstances, then you still have a great deal to learn about what makes a worthwhile and coherent society. There are a raft of posters on this site who seem to think that the answer to unaffordable housing is to punish those who have tried to buy a place to live. Baying for blood in a desperately divided and exploited land wont solve anything. Concern for others is what is needed.

May I end my post as you did...idiot.

Muggers.

Sympathy is not required from the onlookers. We can all be sympathetic, but it helps no-one.

What is required is normal application of human decency to people who find themselves in a "situation".

or as a bank would say ..."difficulties".

Being in difficulties doesnt mean sending in the thugs....It needs help where possible, and an unjudgemental application of the final solutions reached, whether by Courts or by party agreement.

Of course, some people are just not going to shift, and some may well be violent themselves...but the escalation should come from the person outside of process, not the process servers.

Edited by Bloo Loo
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Fair point. BUt we both know that given a chance, people who've got themselves into this mess don't go on their own accord. Maybe they need shoving out?

Too many cries of 'human rights' and distress for me. Pay your bills then. Would they be so sympathetic if they'd loaned the bank £10000 and the bank wasn't giving it back?

Thats why they MUST follow the procedures....otherwise Chaos will follow

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Sure, but everyone's an internet lawyer these days.

You mean they know their rights?

Beyond that, the banks have got away with murder. Before I start shouting for the heads of the little people, I'd like to see a few of theirs rolling first... I support the rule of law, but it seems that the elite feel differently. If justice is only enforced against a vulnerable section of society, then it isn't justice, it's just a version of Jim Crow.

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You mean they know their rights?

Beyond that, the banks have got away with murder. Before I start shouting for the heads of the little people, I'd like to see a few of theirs rolling first... I support the rule of law, but it seems that the elite feel differently. If justice is only enforced against a vulnerable section of society, then it isn't justice, it's just a version of Jim Crow.

Indeed, if using the law keeps bankers in clover, then using the law is quite right for the little people.

It should apply to all....shame that laws arent even used against clear scammers, corrupt organisations and Politicians.

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From what I could tell (could be wrong) the court document wasn't fully completed, needing a signature. If so, that seems like reasonable for the home-owner to resist eviction. Also I got the impression that the court could issue a more powerful document for the Court Bailiff to enforce the judgment. The police weren't heroes though, just preventing a breach of the peace and doing their job.

surely you must mean mortgage holder?

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As far as I understood it repos can only be done with the supervision of a county court bailiff, who are direct court employees ie civil servants. I find it very surprising the way he behaved and effectively played fast and loose with the need for documentation to be spot on.

I've just had a look at a few, of the many, dealing with bailiffs videos on youtube and it does seem, alarmingly, to be a recurring theme that most of them have no real clue what rights they do and don't have and what paperwork they should have.

It's most likely to be exceptionally rare that there is a genuine reason their attempts to collect the debt etc. are rebuffed but there needs to be more regulation. My guess if you did pay up on the doorstep to this scum and it later was proved you didn't owe it you'd find it near impossible to get any charges they'd levied back off them.

These didn't put much effort into collecting.

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Agreed. Do the paperwork properly, then take back what they couldn't ever afford.

This is the point for the paperwork being 100%...the property still belongs to the people being evicted.

The order is for possession....not ownership.

If the paperwork is wrong the eviction is as illegal as a burgler coming onto your premises and taking your telly.

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In terms of possession/repossession there are various steps.

In order to get council assistance with housing, you must wait until the last step to move out.

Step 1 - Initially the court will transfer possession.

Step 2 - A court eviction notice - instructions to leave by a set date. This itself is the act of "eviction".

Step 3 - A forced eviction order - issued if you haven't left by the appointed date - Effectively permission for "the bailiff" to force you to leave, generally by using the police. Basically it's a court order, and it's an offence to break a court order. The police don't "evict" you, the judge did that, the police merely enforce a court order.

There are lots of ways to hold up the process... if you actually turn up at the court hearings it's easy to drag it out for years.

At all points, any mistake in the paperwork and it's another trip to court, usually with a few weeks wait. (If you spot a mistake in the paperwork at the court hearings, don't point it out, let them find out when they present it... "yes this is an eviction notice, but it's for Catpain Blackudder"!)

Ultimately, and I repeat this because it's important, if you want council assistance with housing, you MUST WAIT UNTIL STEP 3. You can move all your stuff out, but you must be resident in the property until the bailiffs turn up with the police, or you are classed as having made yourself homeless. If you plan to stay for this reason but don't want to be anti-social, it's not unreasonable to make it clear to the landlord/bank that you are intending to do this and why, so they can expedite the paperwork. It often makes it easier all round, and reduces agro... if they bailiff knows up front that you are being forced to wait until step 3 they'll be more reasonable... they will understand your circumstances and that you have to wait, and that pressuring you wont make any difference.

Edited by RufflesTheGuineaPig
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  • 434 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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