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After Topps Tiles warning earlier in the week the group that owns b&q had posted some dire numbers. Seems to suggest its weather related but is thay the whole story?

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After Topps Tiles warning earlier in the week the group that owns b&q had posted some dire numbers. Seems to suggest its weather related but is thay the whole story?

How much debt do they have....how much in rent do they pay?

Anyone can open a chain of stores using debt.....real viable long-term businesses have a viable percentage of leveraged debt, a good business model, are prepared to change quickly when necessary with the times, value and reward their staff and are not in it for the quick grab it while you can, fail then rinse and repeat. ;)

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Ah, I woke up a few weeks ago and saw that it was raining.

I decided not to drive to the tile warehouse and to not spend an hour picking out the tiles that I needed to complete my bathroom.

:unsure:

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This is, for me, a timely thread.

I enjoy DIY and was costing up various items last week.

Wilkinsons, which took on many ex-Woolworths stores in high-street locations, presumably more expensive per square foot that B&Q's out-of-town stores, sells hardware items.

I am impressed with Wilkinsons. Their stores are better than the Woolworths they replaced, but this may have been achieved by the VC funding behind them and may be too expensive in the long term

i foiund that for certain identical items (in some cases, clearly off the same production line and essentially similar packaging), B&Q prices were over 5 times what Wilkinsons charged, despite their theoretically lower operating costs.

For any product or service, there is a 'sweet spot' where production costs, price and demand combine to produce the highest profit. Either B&Q or Wilkinsons have got it horribly wrong. I suspect it may be B&Q.

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This is, for me, a timely thread.

I enjoy DIY and was costing up various items last week.

Wilkinsons, which took on many ex-Woolworths stores in high-street locations, presumably more expensive per square foot that B&Q's out-of-town stores, sells hardware items.

I am impressed with Wilkinsons. Their stores are better than the Woolworths they replaced, but this may have been achieved by the VC funding behind them and may be too expensive in the long term

B&Q prices were over 5 times what Wilkinsons charged, despite their theoretically lower operating costs.

For any product or service, there is a 'sweet spot' where production costs, price and demand combine to produce the highest profit. Either B&Q or Wilkinsons have got it horribly wrong. I suspect it may be B&Q.

Seconded. Wilko is always my first port of call these days. After the internet...

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For any product or service, there is a 'sweet spot' where production costs, price and demand combine to produce the highest profit. Either B&Q or Wilkinsons have got it horribly wrong. I suspect it may be B&Q.

Generally speaking, the range of DIY and gardening stuff Wilkinsons stock is well chosen, well priced and competitive with on-line prices imho. They don't compete at the quality end of the scale but that's not their business.

B&Q don't appear to be trying to compete with anyone.

The Wilkinsons stores I've visited do muck up the plants and bulbs side of things badly though. They display them in uncomfortably warm stores till they sprout, dry out and die. Unless you pick up stock as soon as it arrives, it's a waste of time and money all round.

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Seconded. Wilko is always my first port of call these days. After the internet...

And if you can't be bothered about throwing good money after bad on your home diy projects like me, then get a bag of pick n mix, currently half price at 39p per 100g.

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I wish one of the big charities - maybe someone like shelter - would open a warehouse operating like a charity shop that I could dump all the old tools and general crap in my shed and garage, sort out what might be useful/saleable and do some good with it

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I wish one of the big charities - maybe someone like shelter - would open a warehouse operating like a charity shop that I could dump all the old tools and general crap in my shed and garage, sort out what might be useful/saleable and do some good with it

In Christchurch (NZ) there's an operation just like that called the Red Shed. I think I bought one thing from it in a dozen visits. The older tools were carbon steel and had been allowed to rust beyond salvation. Newer, stainless steel tools were just plain broke beyond salvation. (If you were looking for spare keys for Spectrums and Walkman drive belts it was the nuts though)

Edited by Nuggets Mahoney

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...

i foiund that for certain identical items (in some cases, clearly off the same production line and essentially similar packaging), B&Q prices were over 5 times what Wilkinsons charged, despite their theoretically lower operating costs.

...

I've noticed the same thing with Wilkinsons vs. Homebase.

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If you have a "What store" near to you... its worth a look for plants ......way cheaper than garden centres and B±Q....ones just opened in Caerphilly and I think its going to take a fair slice out of b&Q's annual turnover ....nearby

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Once need a moderate amount of timber. The local independent merchant was way cheaper than B&Q. Things like disposable respirators were a fiver on eBay but 20 quid in B&Q.

Also Home Buy is supposed to stimulate the economy because people spend lots of money on carpets, new kitchens and DIY crap when they move house. But the trouble is so many younger people max-out that there's no money left. Back in the height of the boom I knew a few people that were spending every penny, interest only, and just living in complete renovation jobs with no immediate plans to do the renovation.

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Also Home Buy is supposed to stimulate the economy because people spend lots of money on carpets, new kitchens and DIY crap when they move house. But the trouble is so many younger people max-out that there's no money left. Back in the height of the boom I knew a few people that were spending every penny, interest only, and just living in complete renovation jobs with no immediate plans to do the renovation.

I work with a guy like that. In his 20s he bought in the southeast of England in the mid-2000s with his then girlfriend, then they split up and he bought her out using his savings. He's now servicing a ~4.5x salary mortgage on his own plus paying many thousands a year for a season ticket to London. He told me his patio door and shower have both been broken for a long time but he can't afford to fix them.

Edited by Dorkins

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I wish one of the big charities - maybe someone like shelter - would open a warehouse operating like a charity shop that I could dump all the old tools and general crap in my shed and garage, sort out what might be useful/saleable and do some good with it

In Oldham there's bulky bobs.

http://www.bulkybobs.co.uk/index.php

They take crap and sell it on.

It's a 'social business' whatever that means.

http://www.frcgroup.co.uk/

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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