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Diet Soda As Bad For Teeth As Meth, Dentists Prove

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Diet soda addicts, beware: heavy consumption of the highly acidic drinks can cause tooth damage that resembles the effects of methamphetamine or crack cocaine.

Those who drink large amounts of diet soda for long periods of time often experience tooth erosion, rotting, decay and other types of oral damage – in many cases just as bad or worse as the effects experienced by long-term drug users, according to a new study published in the journal General Dentistry.

“You look at it side-to-side with ‘meth mouth’ or ‘coke mouth,’ it is startling to see the intensity and extent of damage more or less the same,” Dr. Mohammed Boussiouny, a professor of restorative dentistry at the Temple University School of Dentistry, told Health Day News.

The study references a woman in her 30’s who drank about two liters of diet soda every day for 3-5 years and suffered from eroded teeth that resembled those of a 29-year-old meth addict who had been taking drugs for three years and a 51-year-old crack cocaine user who had an 18-year-history drug abuse.

The woman’s teeth were soft, discolored and eroded, and dentists were unable to save any of the affected teeth. The woman had no choice but to have every last tooth removed and replaced with dentures.

“None of the teeth affected by erosion were salvageable,” Boussiouny said.

The woman had been drinking diet soda for years because she was worried that regular soda would cause her to gain weight. She was aware of the risks associated with consuming artificially sweetened beverages, but admitted that she hadn’t seen a dentist in years.

The American Beverage Association responded to the results of the study, defending the consumption of diet soda and telling Health Day News that the woman’s lack of dentist visits was the primary cause of her tooth decay.

“The woman referenced in this article did not receive dental health services for more than 20 years – two-thirds of her life,” the group said in a statement. “To single out diet soda consumption as the unique factor in her tooth decay and erosion – and to compare it to that from illicit drug use – is irresponsible…. The body of available science does not support that beverages are a unique factor in causing tooth decay or erosion.”

But Dr. Eugene Antenucci, a spokesman for the Academy of General Dentistry, said he has seen the effects of diet soda in many addicts, and explained that some of them experienced “very deep brown stains, where it’s actually eroded into the tooth, and the teeth are soft and leathery.”

Most diet soda consumers will never see such effects, but to ensure clean and healthy teeth, Antenucci advises that they wash away the acidity of the substance with water after drinking soda, brushing their teeth at least twice daily and drinking in moderation.

Diet soda – like crack cocaine and meth – is highly acidic, which wears away enamel and causes teeth to become susceptible to cavities. Colas, for example, have erosive potential 10 times that of fruit juice, according to a previous 2007 study published in General Dentistry. This study found that teeth immersed in Coke, Pepsi, RC Cola, Squirt, Surge, 7 Up and Diet 7 Up lost more than five percent of their weight, due to enamel erosion. The most acidic soft drink studied at the time was RC Cola, which had a pH of 2.387. Cherry Coke had a pH level of 2.522 and Coke had a pH level of 2.525. Battery acid, in comparison, has a pH level of 1.0, and pure water has a pH level of 7.0.

Thomas P. Connelly, a New York-based cosmetic dentist, says that diet soda consumers tend to drink more of the substance than those who consume regular sodas, which is often a factor in their tooth erosion. With many Americans convinced that the sugar-free drinks will prevent them from gaining weight, they can quickly become addicted and self-inflict tooth damage, like drug users.

“I don’t know how many times I’ve heard, ‘I’m addicted to diet coke’ from a patient,” he wrote in a Huffington Post blog. “Even though it has sugar, I’d almost rather see people drink regular pop, because I’m convinced that one or two regular pops are less damaging than seven of the diet version (again, people who drink diet soda tend to drink a lot of it). But truthfully, I’d rather see people drink neither.”

For me, diet drinks are awful tasting. Vile. I don't get where the addiction comes from. Must be some chemical dependence.

And yes, several women I know are really hooked on this stuff, and all have baked bean teeth.

If you want your chubby girlfriend to both lose weight and her teeth, all in for Diet Cola.

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For me, diet drinks are awful tasting. Vile. I don't get where the addiction comes from. Must be some chemical dependence.

And yes, several women I know are really hooked on this stuff, and all have baked bean teeth.

If you want your chubby girlfriend to both lose weight and her teeth, all in for Diet Cola.

Only she won't lose weight, several stories this year about diet drinks making you fatter than sugared drinks.

It's to do with the body expecting sugar calories after tasting the sweetness, not getting them, and then craving food as a consequence.

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I love diet coke. Don't make me stop.

I asked my dentist a while back and they didn't seem to think there was anything too bad with diet drinks.

(as compared to sugary, fizzy drinks)

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Bloke I work with drinks about 4 litres a day of the stuff. Sits at his desk chugging it straight out of a 2 litre bottle.

Can't be doing his health much good.

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I love diet coke. Don't make me stop.

I asked my dentist a while back and they didn't seem to think there was anything too bad with diet drinks.

(as compared to sugary, fizzy drinks)

Speaking as someone who used to chug half a dozen cans a day...

Have you ever stopped and asked yourself why you're so keen on drinking something, probably a lot of that something, that tastes like p*ss?

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Speaking as someone who used to chug half a dozen cans a day...

Have you ever stopped and asked yourself why you're so keen on drinking something, probably a lot of that something, that tastes like p*ss?

When I try switching to water, I end up drinking very little.

Can have the odd tea, but there's not really any other option with going into mega sugar stuff.

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When I try switching to water, I end up drinking very little.

Can have the odd tea, but there's not really any other option with going into mega sugar stuff.

I drink a lot of fluids and picked up a serious diet cola habit because, like you say, the flavoured alternatives all seemed to be sugary.

The thing is you can become addicted to the stuff, and I mean addicted. Do some googling on the potential health effects of artificial sweeteners, especially aspartame; tumours in lab rats, excitotoxicity, and even after you've parked the TFH stuff to one side it's reasonable to ask yourself why run any risk at all, however slight, to drink gallons of a synthetic product that tastes like p*ss?

If you can get used to drinking something that tastes as foul as diet cola you can get used to drinking all sorts of (non sweetened) alternatives.

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“The woman referenced in this article did not receive dental health services for more than 20 years – two-thirds of her life,” the group said in a statement. “To single out diet soda consumption as the unique factor in her tooth decay and erosion – and to compare it to that from illicit drug use – is irresponsible…. The body of available science does not support that beverages are a unique factor in causing tooth decay or erosion.

It appears the beverage association seem to think that no-one had any teeth before dentists came along to 'save the teeth' (they may have somewhat of a warped point!)

Anyway, I don't drink these vile diet pops, my teeth get nicely rinsed with water during the day and then anything from 2-6 litres of cider/lager/bitter of an evening.

:unsure:

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anything from 2-6 litres of cider/lager/bitter of an evening

Hola! Dude, you'll end up with the metabolic age of an octogenarian!... your liver function will be way out of whack.

Perhaps switch to smoking weed?

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Hola! Dude, you'll end up with the metabolic age of an octogenarian!... your liver function will be way out of whack.

Perhaps switch to smoking weed?

Tried weed once and only once - laughed my head off for hours, loved it and have nothing against it.

Prefer the longer drawn out drinking though rather than being off my boobs in seconds. Happy drunkard here :)

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diet coke? wouldn't touch it.

my summer thirst quencher at home is:

lager.jpg

.. or similar (supermarket cheap low-alc pissy lager)

and WTF is "soda" when it's at home? for baking?

article-0-0053C7E600000258-709_233x310.jpg

It's American for "pop".

Edit: Ah, it seems it's not quite so simple. Apparently "soda", "pop" and "coke" are all used as generic terms for carbonated soft beverages in the US. There's even a website dedicated to documenting their use:

http://www.popvssoda.com/

It seems that "soda" is used on the west and east coasts, "pop" in the north and mid-west, and "coke" in the south. It's amazing what you can find on the internet.

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So the sugar feeds the bacteria that produce the acid that corrodes the enamel.

Brush with coconut oil and a dab of sodium bicarbonate. No more dentist, even if you do chug soda.

I find toothpaste encourages build up of plaque.

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So the sugar feeds the bacteria that produce the acid that corrodes the enamel.

Brush with coconut oil and a dab of sodium bicarbonate. No more dentist, even if you do chug soda.

I find toothpaste encourages build up of plaque.

so if we brush with soda then we can drink soda.

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So the sugar feeds the bacteria that produce the acid that corrodes the enamel.

Brush with coconut oil and a dab of sodium bicarbonate. No more dentist, even if you do chug soda.

I find toothpaste encourages build up of plaque.

No, you just failed basic comprehension. It's the drinks themselves that are acidic in this case, nothing to do with sugar or bacteria.

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No, you just failed basic comprehension. It's the drinks themselves that are acidic in this case, nothing to do with sugar or bacteria.

Thanks for your courtesy.

The point still stands.

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Done a dash of quick google 'research' on the booze bit - ph of cola is around 2.5 (nasty). Cider not great at around 3-4 and beer the best bet at 4.5ish.

So there you have it, ditch the diet pops and get stuck into the liquor.

I could be the next Gillian McKeith (sp.).

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Bogging.

At least do the courtesy to your liver and spend a bit more on a craft ale/lager!

It's 2% so you can drink away without getting pissed.

I quite like:

010351.jpg?v=1

Which is extremely cheap, about £1 for four IIRC, and at 2.1% again means you can drink quite a lot of beer without getting a thick head the next morning.

I drink decent stuff as well but like to mix it up.

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Beer is much nicer than pop!

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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