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I've been looking at "used" houses for just over a year now, but the new government scheme has stoked up a lot of interest, well certainly down here in Hampshire. I visited a development in Shedfield a few weeks back which was packed with potential buyers. Wasn't for me though, the 2 beds were tiny and I didn't like the layout of the three beds (or the price at £280k).

Anyway, I was trying to make sense of the view here that new builds are rabbit hutches, yet the dimensions in some developers' brochures actually seem fairly reasonable. For example, here's a plan for a 3 bed semi:

Floor plan

Went to visit and I was surprised at how small the place was (compared to older homes). Couldn't get my head around it until I realised how the rooms are measured...check out bedroom 1, there's a bathroom taking up a fair amount of space and yet it's still counted as space :lol:

The same house in a more desirable area is even smaller:

Floorplan 2

Really not for me I'm afraid, but they are certainly selling quickly. Government obviously knows what it's doing!

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Same (but worse) in cambridge

£380k for this in a new suburb in the desired south side of town

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/new-homes-for-sale/property-41818226.html?premiumA=true

(check out extreme fish eye kitchen shot)

or £310k for this in a meh eastern suburb

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/new-homes-for-sale/property-39822239.html

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Watched an older repeated QI prog the other night and 'who has the smallest houses in the world?' was a question ... of course we do.

I watched that bit of the same QI episode. It was broadcast in 2010 but I bet it is still the case. Depressing. :(

To be truthful, I don't need a huge amount of living space. A 1 bedroomed property with decent cupboard space would suffice. I don't have a lot of furniture but I do have a fair amount of clutter.

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No we are not buying the sofa, the headboard, the bedspreads, the dining room table and table settings, the curtains, the soft coloured coordinated towels, the rugs and ribbons, the twigs and flowers.......four walls looking at another four walls.....that is what you buy. ;)

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It's the 'friends' and 'coronation street' effect where they always have the kitchen in the lounge. Makes it easier for the script writer but why this has translated into 'real life' is anyone guess ... unless it has enabled the overall living space to be reduced while a high price is retained. Always fun having the washer next to the TV when the washer goes into the spin cycle.

I like a combine kitchen diner as it is much more sociable than a separate kitchen. A proper extractor can still get rid of excess smoke. Als why have a washing machine in a kitchen. Surely the bathroom is a better location for a generally wet item while having the plumbing in place.

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I like a combine kitchen diner as it is much more sociable than a separate kitchen. A proper extractor can still get rid of excess smoke. Als why have a washing machine in a kitchen. Surely the bathroom is a better location for a generally wet item while having the plumbing in place.

That's where the washing machine often is in France and Spain. Having said that, I wouldn't fancy that as a set-up. Also, the regulations applicable in the UK mean the bathroom would have to be huge - understandable given how well water and electricity don't mix.

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Weird to see a new house where they seem to have forgotten the dividing wall between kitchen and living room.

As much as I dislike a lot of new houses, I do actually like open plan living rooms. When you have kids its ideal for you to be able to cook whilst keeping an eye on them and if you like to have dinner parties its nice to be able to be in the same room as your guests whilst preparing dinner. The secret to this style of living, though, is to have your washing machine and tumble dryer in a 'laundry'. Of course 99% of developers today forget this...

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No we are not buying the sofa, the headboard, the bedspreads, the dining room table and table settings, the curtains, the soft coloured coordinated towels, the rugs and ribbons, the twigs and flowers.......four walls looking at another four walls.....that is what you buy. ;)

ah but walls take up precious floorspace. First you have a kitchen, dining room, and lounge, then a kitchen-diner and lounge, now a lounge-kitchen-diner, next, who knows, a lounge-kitchen-diner-bedroom? :blink:

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I watched that bit of the same QI episode. It was broadcast in 2010 but I bet it is still the case. Depressing. :(

...

This website http://www.demographia.com/db-intlhouse.htm details international house sizes. Unfortunately no page date is available but it still makes for interesting reading. Our US and Aus friends seem to feel that their houses need to be 3x that of ours.

Personally, I think that the McMansions of these countries are completely unnecessary and just sap the wealth earning potential of their owners. That said I also think UK new builds are not designed for people to live in but to simply read well on paper and during a cursory show home viewing.

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it is amazing that japanese homes have more space than we do.

one solution to fit more into the same space would be to build proper apartments in the UK for families.

i think more people would happily live in apartments if they were not just cramped boxes but genuine 1200-1500 sq ft homes.

you could build up in 5-6 storeys and save a lot of space, but that kind of option just doesnt exist in the UK.

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it is amazing that japanese homes have more space than we do.

one solution to fit more into the same space would be to build proper apartments in the UK for families.

i think more people would happily live in apartments if they were not just cramped boxes but genuine 1200-1500 sq ft homes.

you could build up in 5-6 storeys and save a lot of space, but that kind of option just doesnt exist in the UK.

Exactly, I think there are loads of us who want to live/rent/buy flats in the UK but all we have is a load of shite to pick from...

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it is amazing that japanese homes have more space than we do.

one solution to fit more into the same space would be to build proper apartments in the UK for families.

i think more people would happily live in apartments if they were not just cramped boxes but genuine 1200-1500 sq ft homes.

you could build up in 5-6 storeys and save a lot of space, but that kind of option just doesnt exist in the UK.

They'd have to have a more acceptable form of title i.e. not leasehold, and the whole business of maintenance charges would have to be sorted out.

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Anyway, I was trying to make sense of the view here that new builds are rabbit hutches, yet the dimensions in some developers' brochures actually seem fairly reasonable. For example, here's a plan for a 3 bed semi:

From the numbers in the brochure, I make that about 900 square feet over two floors. Our three bed house is about 2200 square feet over three floors (ground, bedroom and basement) and we could do with more.

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Those bedrooms are ridiculously small:

First floor

Bedroom 1 3.90 x 3.13 m = 12.20 sqm

Bedroom 2 3.18 x 2.71 m = 8.61 sqm

Bedroom 3 3.18 x 1.96 m = 6.23 sqm

The master bedroom (bedroom 1) is smaller than the second bedroom of my 2 bed flat here in Switzerland (and this flat is low end for Switzerland).

Bedroom 3 would be called a broom cupboard in most parts of Europe, a bedroom should never be smaller than 10 sqm.

Here is the size of the two bedrooms of my current flat for comparison:

Bedroom 1 4.30 x 3.50 m = 15.05 sqm

Bedroom 2 4.30 x 3.00 m = 12.90 sqm

In fact total sqm of those 3 bedrooms in that house are still less than total sqm of the 2 bedrooms in my flat!

---

Edited by The Eagle

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Weird to see a new house where they seem to have forgotten the dividing wall between kitchen and living room.

I prefer the open plan kitchen, dining & living room. It makes the house brighter, more social and easier to manage.

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This website http://www.demographia.com/db-intlhouse.htm details international house sizes. Unfortunately no page date is available but it still makes for interesting reading. Our US and Aus friends seem to feel that their houses need to be 3x that of ours.

Personally, I think that the McMansions of these countries are completely unnecessary and just sap the wealth earning potential of their owners. That said I also think UK new builds are not designed for people to live in but to simply read well on paper and during a cursory show home viewing.

I've just found this:

Percapita.gif

http://shrinkthatfootprint.com/how-big-is-a-house

Not sure if the source is reliable.

.

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I guess Russia must be struggling for room... :unsure:

I guess maybe it has something to do with it being cheaper to heat a smaller apartment in those spine freezing winters they get? that plus when you are hammered on vodka you dont really notice how big or small your home is?

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I guess maybe it has something to do with it being cheaper to heat a smaller apartment in those spine freezing winters they get? that plus when you are hammered on vodka you dont really notice how big or small your home is?

It's a bit to do with places like Russia and probably Spain and Italy going by that chart having many more families living together, or sharing flats. Seems a bit daft given how big some of these countries are, economically a good option i'd guess.

Edited by motch

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Those bedrooms are ridiculously small:

First floor

Bedroom 1 3.90 x 3.13 m = 12.20 sqm

Bedroom 2 3.18 x 2.71 m = 8.61 sqm

Bedroom 3 3.18 x 1.96 m = 6.23 sqm

The master bedroom (bedroom 1) is smaller than the second bedroom of my 2 bed flat here in Switzerland (and this flat is low end for Switzerland).

Bedroom 3 would be called a broom cupboard in most parts of Europe, a bedroom should never be smaller than 10 sqm.

Here is the size of the two bedrooms of my current flat for comparison:

Bedroom 1 4.30 x 3.50 m = 15.05 sqm

Bedroom 2 4.30 x 3.00 m = 12.90 sqm

In fact total sqm of those 3 bedrooms in that house are still less than total sqm of the 2 bedrooms in my flat!

---

The largest bedroom is not actually 12.2m^2. That's what it would be, if it were square!

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The largest bedroom is not actually 12.2m^2. That's what it would be, if it were square!

Right, I missed that.

This house is simply ridiculous even my London shoebox flat had a 11 sqm master bedroom (and it was rectangular).

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Another issue with new build estates in my area, is how greedy the developers have been in cramming in too many houses to the detriment of the estate in general.

Not only are the houses small themselves, but the plots are tiny too. Back gardens little bigger than a postage stamp, often no front garden at all. You're lucky if you get a 1 car driveway, more often it's a parking space you can't guarantee won't get used by others, and a garage in a block, situated behind the houses (which you usually navigate to by driving through a shared car-port type gap in the housing). The roads in these estates are as thin as possible. Add that to the lack of parking, the high density housing, and throw in a bus route winding through the estate and driving round these places becomes a nightmare.

Plus, in some cases the build quality obviously sucks. The very newest estates can look kind of pleasant in their stark uniform lego-land look, but in the estates built a year or two ago I've seen doors that look like they're falling apart, rusting hinges etc. They look more like future slums. Can't see them holding their value at all once they're 10-20 years old and competing with houses on estates built in the 80's and 90's which in comparison are far more attractive with far bigger plots.

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I guess Russia must be struggling for room... :unsure:

I'm sure you could probably buy a thousand acres of Siberia for the price of a two bed flat in Moscow, but the commute would freeze you out of the jobs market.............

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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