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Britain Was Just Six Hours From Running Out Of Gas

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http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/402429/Britain-was-just-six-hours-from-running-out-of-gas

The narrow escape from a frozen Britain has raised concerns over increasing reliance on foreign gas.

The alarm was raised last night by the Crown Estate, which manages vast undersea gas caverns.

It said the country was just hours from “interruptions to supply” in March.

...

A spokesman for the Department of Energy and Climate Change said: “Storage is only one source so it is misleading to talk purely about how many hours’ supply is in storage.”

If you exclude storage how long can the UK keep going with just gas being delivered on demand?

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from Wiki:

Gas more recently was stored in large underground reservoirs such as salt caverns. In modern times however line-packing is the preferred method.

Gas can be temporarily stored in the pipeline system itself, through a process called line packing. This is done by packing more gas into the pipeline by an increase in the pressure. During periods of high demand, greater quantities of gas can be withdrawn from the pipeline in the market area, than is injected at the production area. The process of line packing is usually performed during off peak times to meet the next day’s peaking demands. This method, however, only provides a temporary short-term substitute for traditional underground storage.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_gas_storage#Pipeline_capacity

I wonder if increasing the gas pressure has an effect on how much appliances use and on their reliability???

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I wonder if increasing the gas pressure has an effect on how much appliances use and on their reliability???

It is only the "bulk" mains that are highly pressurized, and can be "linepacked". Local distribution pipes operate at a much lower pressure, and each gas meter will have its own regulator, as gas appliances must have their pressure regulated to within a few percent. High powered appliances (like boilers) will have their own internal regulator as well.

National Grid substantially increased their linepack during the Winter, precisely because they used it as storage - the "extra" Winter linepack was around 1-2 days of storage requirements.

If you exclude storage how long can the UK keep going with just gas being delivered on demand?

It depends how cold it is. North Sea, interconnectors and LNG would be able to supply the country completely, except on the coldest days (about 7 days in February and 10 days in March). However, this would be an expensive way of doing it; imported gas (during Winter) and LNG are a LOT more expensive than indigenous or stored gas.

There is also some flexibility in electricity generation, with electricity producers tending to switch to coal if gas prices rise. That said, this year was somewhat unusual as there was unusually little gas use for electricity, due to rock bottom coal prices.

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Hold on! The Guardian had this yesterday:

Energy suppliers held back gas during UK shortage

Terminals near London and in Wales were 40% and 52% full on the day it was claimed the UK had six hours' worth of gas left.

Some of Britain's biggest energy suppliers were holding back gas in storage tanks at a time when the market ran into an acute shortage two months ago, triggering a doubling of wholesale prices.

The revelations came after claims the UK was within six hours of running out of gas completely on 22 March and will feed rising public and political anger over soaring power bills and previous allegations of market manipulation.

The National Grid, which keeps data on the gas industry, revealed that the Liquefied Natural Gas terminal at the Isle of Grain near London, used by BP, Centrica and other big suppliers, was 40% full on 22 March. The South Hook LNG plant in south Wales, owned by ExxonMobil and Total, was 52% full on the same day, at a time when various pipeline and other supply problems caused gas prices to hit 150 pence a therm.

[continues...]

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/may/24/energy-suppliers-held-back-gas-uk

Now I don't know what to think.

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Hold on! The Guardian had this yesterday:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/business/2013/may/24/energy-suppliers-held-back-gas-uk

Now I don't know what to think.

At the time when the gas shortage was worst, these terminals were releasing gas at maximum flow.

These terminals do not have very good flow rates; it would have taken 2 weeks to drain those terminals at maximum flow. Indeed, as soon as cold-snap weather forecasts came in, LNG tankers at sea where diverted to these terminals to top-up them up.

Edited by ChumpusRex

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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