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3-D Printed Bullet This Time


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Blanks typically have a much smaller powder charge than live rounds, because they don't have to push a bullet down the barrel.

Is this correct? I had heard that because of the absence of a bullet they needed more powder to cycle the gun's action. Maybe it depends upon make.

I suspect the case is probably weaker too, since it doesn't have to sustain the pressure required to push a bullet down the barrel.

Maybe, maybe not. The cases only cost a few pennies so I'm not sure it would be logical to have a completely different production line for blank cases just to save a tiny fraction of a penny per round. I'm not sure it would make much difference either way since the cartridges are usually supported by the barrel.

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I wouldn't be so sure about that.

Colour printer ink can be traced to the printer and shop the ink came from.

3D thermoplastics and polymers will be laced with something traceable as well.

What if you mixed it up?

Would tracing to a shop to a open source printer and a branch of Comet help much either?

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@Traktion: re Tribler: From their website: "The scientific research and programming on Tribler is supported by the European Union 7th framework research program.". A honeypot if ever I saw one.

As it's open source, what are you expecting to be hidden in there? If there is something hidden in there, someone could take the source code and develop a version that runs over Tor or some such.

The main point is that Tribler can't be shut down, as there is no central server - the index is distributed. PirateBay, on the other hand, can be blocked easily by ISPs.

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The creators of the Internet- the basic protocols that run it- had a vision of it's future use- they assumed it would be a way for a small group of scientists to share data and ideas over distance- and that's all it would be used for- never in their wildest dreams could they have imagined what others might do with the technology they had created.

So predictions as to the impact of 3D printing are likely to be just as wrong.

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The creators of the Internet- the basic protocols that run it- had a vision of it's future use- they assumed it would be a way for a small group of scientists to share data and ideas over distance- and that's all it would be used for- never in their wildest dreams could they have imagined what others might do with the technology they had created.

So predictions as to the impact of 3D printing are likely to be just as wrong.

It will revolutionise logistics, transportation, traffic, manufacturing for a start.

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Thanks - I'd seen the house before but it's good to have the links explicit.

Two great results of 3D house printing would be, first, much cheaper production costs, but then second, as a result, the exposure of the current high land costs in all their ugliness!

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Thanks - I'd seen the house before but it's good to have the links explicit.

Two great results of 3D house printing would be, first, much cheaper production costs, but then second, as a result, the exposure of the current high land costs in all their ugliness!

3-D printing of houses is already being experimented with. There was a Grand Designs on a 'Computer Cut House' (Series 12 Ep 2). This could revolutionalise house building with the delivery to site of raw materials and the builder 'printing' what they need.

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It will revolutionise logistics, transportation, traffic, manufacturing for a start.

Indeed, at least for certain types of items.

Some people argue that a 3D printer would be too expensive for a typical household.

Not if the printer is itself mostly 3D-printed, such as with the RepRap project. I am tempted to make one, partly out of curiousity, and partly I could also find the occasional practicul use for one. Costs could fall to near the cost of materials (and their delivery) and energy

Another critiscism is that people would still have to assemble the produced parts. Again, for many products, this is hardly a significant problem. People are also experimenting with developing self-assembling machines. So think of a printer that make it's own parts, and assemble itself.

This concept is already being considered for space exploration. Probes that mine their own materials on another world, replicate and move on. (This is also cited as evidence that there is no other intelligent life in the universe, otherwise aliens would be making these, and we would be buried up to our necks in alien exploration probes.)

So, soon, the Workers could own the Means of Production. So expect moves to stop this by Luddite industries.

The next step is the self-replicating weapon.

The final step is the virally-replicating weapon. It need not even have it's own sophisticated replication mechanism - viruses hijack the reproductive system of the unwilling host.

I think that a virally-replicating weapon could simply hijack a factory at (metaphorical) gunpoint.

Not so fantastical, when you consider that parts of the original 'drone', the V1 Fieseler Fi103R Reichenberg 'Doodlebug', was manufactured by the Nazis at Mittelwerk using slave labour.

The drones will sail overhead, and we will slave away below, All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace.

Edited by happy_renting
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3d printer saves lives:

Fears about 3D printed guns might be at fever pitch, but one child named Kaiba Gionfriddo has just had his life saved by the same technology.

The infant was born with tracheobronchomalacia, a condition which gives weakened support for the trachea, and suffered from windpipe collapse on a daily basis. That is, until researchers at the University of Michigan managed to find a 3D printed solution.

The printed splint was tailored to the infant to hold the trachea in place, letting the bronchus build around it. Kaiba has been off ventilator support since, following a successful operation.

To construct the splint, doctors made a precise image of Kaiba's trachea and bronchus with a CT scan. Then, using computer modeling, they created a splint that would exactly fit around the airway, said study researcher Scott Hollister, a professor of biomedical engineering at the university. The model was then produced on a 3D printer.

The device is made out of a material called polycaprolactone, and will dissolve after about three years. By that time, Kaiba's windpipe will have grown, reducing pressure on the organ, and the splint will no longer be needed.

A splint like Kaiba's splint can be made in about 24 hours and costs about one-third the price of a hand-carved version, Green said.

3D_Printed_Splint-580-75.jpg

Edited by mfp123
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Heart-warming post mfp. Thanks.

Does anyone have an idea of how long it takes 3D printers of different sizes to complete objects of different sizes (and materials) - and whether those materials need any drying/setting times beyond the time the printer's in motion?

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  • 429 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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