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3-D Printed Bullet This Time

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Incisive comment on the Wail article:

This is part of a much larger debate where the means of production (and distruction) are coming into the hands of the people. This is Karl Marx dream. Imagine that this is the start of the revolution that anything you desire can be freely downloaded and printed. There are already 3D printers that can make houses and NASA is embarking on a food printer. What then happens to capital? Capital in the sense of stored money becomes worthless because there is no demand for anything that can't be fulfilled locally at home. How society will transition to a post-capitalist society without a really big punch-up scares the heck out of me!

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'Incisive' :lol:

So presumably the 3D printers will be able to print the raw materials and energy that they will use, for free then? :rolleyes:

"Raw materials" - in time that will be any old rubbish, stuff we currently recycle and so on.

"Energy" - are you following the present LENR thread? How hard would it be to make standalone 3D printers, perhaps with solar input or whatever (depending on climate obviously).

Intellectual capital, access to resources and raw material.

You forgot to mention land B)

(1) Free blueprint downloads

(2) & (3) See above....

Also I am sure there will always be key desirable substances and objects that can't be printed.

Yes - it's still not transmutation of elements, so gold would still not come cheap.

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Im going to download the latest page 3 model.

Given that 3d printers are already being used in conjunction with biotechnology to print new organs, that may not be as far fetched as you would think.

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Wake up.

Feds had to take down a site last week that put up the plans for a gun and there were over 100,000 downloads before they could do so.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57583919-76/the-pirate-bay-now-offering-banned-3d-printed-gun-files/

Yawn, it's far easier to get hold of a real gun (not just in the US, almost everywhere in the world) than to get hold of a 3D printer.

Apart from that, calling that device a gun is a bit far fetched... you got a single shot if you are lucky that it works at all.

---

Edited by The Eagle

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Prisoners in jail can make guns as effective as the 3D printer version, much cheaper as well. A plastic gun is a useless gimmick, a kitchen knife is more effective as a weapon.

The gunpowder is the only controlled part of bullets and there are freely available substitutes.

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Prisoners in jail can make guns as effective as the 3D printer version, much cheaper as well. A plastic gun is a useless gimmick, a kitchen knife is more effective as a weapon.

True, today the 3D printed gun is pretty much just fodder for the paranoid anti-gun nuts. I visited a gun museum some years ago where they had many examples of guns made in primitive conditions with basic materials and tools, from pistols to submachineguns, which would likely have been far more effective than anything coming out of a current 3D printer.

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You can buy a catapult at most ned/yob friendly anti-social accessory shops across Britain that would send an equally available steel ball bearing or nut at lethal velocities.

Printed bullets. Big deal.

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"Raw materials" - in time that will be any old rubbish, stuff we currently recycle and so on.

"Energy" - are you following the present LENR thread? How hard would it be to make standalone 3D printers, perhaps with solar input or whatever (depending on climate obviously).

Yes, it'll be just like 'Back to the Future'

d2xvnio.jpg

I think you, and the journalists, need to get a grip on what is actually possible in terms of technology for energy, materials and the general abilities of 3D printers.

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When they get the Star Trek replicator working I'll get excitied.

Assuming they can keep it running without losing life support whenever things get tough. I never figured out why life support was always the last place to take emergency energy from, but the grav-plating could obviously run on a couple of AA batteries. dry.gif

p.s. No need for printed bullets. You can use ball bearings out of old hard drives. I saw this on an episode of Rizzoli & Isles so it must be true. American drama never gets its facts wrong.

.

.

Edited by Stainless Sam

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True, today the 3D printed gun is pretty much just fodder for the paranoid anti-gun nuts. I visited a gun museum some years ago where they had many examples of guns made in primitive conditions with basic materials and tools, from pistols to submachineguns, which would likely have been far more effective than anything coming out of a current 3D printer.

indeed, I recently saw a pic of a hand powered metal staple gun converted to a gun

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Wake up.

Feds had to take down a site last week that put up the plans for a gun and there were over 100,000 downloads before they could do so.

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11386_3-57583919-76/the-pirate-bay-now-offering-banned-3d-printed-gun-files/

Once data is on the Internet, if it is useful, it will never be removed. Bittorrent put pay to that and Tribler even removed the need for gateway sites (like PirateBay).

The days of prohibition are drawing to a close. States are going to have to negotiate more and threaten less, if they are going to last.

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Yawn, it's far easier to get hold of a real gun (not just in the US, almost everywhere in the world) than to get hold of a 3D printer.

Apart from that, calling that device a gun is a bit far fetched... you got a single shot if you are lucky that it works at all.

---

Printing one is completely untraceable. That's very different from buying a gun, even in the US.

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I think that what a lot of people miss is the speed of technical progression. The first printer I used was attached to a mainframe, it was the size of a desk and it hammered out code lists in shoddy font on special perforated paper. You needed ear defenders when using it, and it cost a fortune. Now I can buy a printer that can print full colour A3 pages for less than £200.

So today, 3d printers knock out fairly ropey products - they are not that strong, and they are a bit gimmicky. In 20 years, they will be a lot better. I think the revolution will come in the raw materials space - so the "ink" they use will need to change, and probably involve some sort of curing process. This will be pretty much the holy grail for anyone working on in this area, and you can bet a lot of money is being thrown at it.

This is not going to replace factories for large production runs. Imagine printing your daily newspaper (in the old days) on your HP - it would cost about £4.00 a copy - better to get it for 50p from the newsagent. So for large runs, a big press and a 50 tonnes of plastic will remain cheaper. For one offs, and stuff that is worth the expense (need I say guns) ... 3d printing will change everything.

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Big deal. Printed bullet. Wake me up when someone prints the propellant.

No problem getting hold of 9mm blanks, I don't think it would be too hard to convert those to live ammunition.

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I think that what a lot of people miss is the speed of technical progression. The first printer I used was attached to a mainframe, it was the size of a desk and it hammered out code lists in shoddy font on special perforated paper. You needed ear defenders when using it, and it cost a fortune. Now I can buy a printer that can print full colour A3 pages for less than £200.

So today, 3d printers knock out fairly ropey products - they are not that strong, and they are a bit gimmicky. In 20 years, they will be a lot better. I think the revolution will come in the raw materials space - so the "ink" they use will need to change, and probably involve some sort of curing process. This will be pretty much the holy grail for anyone working on in this area, and you can bet a lot of money is being thrown at it.

This is not going to replace factories for large production runs. Imagine printing your daily newspaper (in the old days) on your HP - it would cost about £4.00 a copy - better to get it for 50p from the newsagent. So for large runs, a big press and a 50 tonnes of plastic will remain cheaper. For one offs, and stuff that is worth the expense (need I say guns) ... 3d printing will change everything.

Absolutely.

I think those with a bit of vision are looking at what happened to music, videos, software etc (regarding IP 'violations' and easy re-distribution) and are wondering if the same will apply to physical stuff. Certainly, as the technology improves, open source blue prints for various objects are going to become common, as are 'pirate' blue prints.

As the technology moves from small, simple, plastic items to more complex/robust items, it is going to impact hard on some industries. It will also make controlling what objects people can own near impossible. Guns are one thing which states worry about, but recreational drugs could be another in the future.

Ofc, that's not to say they could only make 'illegal' stuff. They could make useful drugs and items too. I know there was a presentation about a 3D printer for building houses, another about building a base on Mars or the Moon.

We're only just scratching the surface, currently. There seems to be a lot of interest in these devices too. Just look at Kickstarter for numerous examples.

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Printing one is completely untraceable. That's very different from buying a gun, even in the US.

I wouldn't be so sure about that.

Colour printer ink can be traced to the printer and shop the ink came from.

3D thermoplastics and polymers will be laced with something traceable as well.

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No problem getting hold of 9mm blanks, I don't think it would be too hard to convert those to live ammunition.

Blanks typically have a much smaller powder charge than live rounds, because they don't have to push a bullet down the barrel. I suspect the case is probably weaker too, since it doesn't have to sustain the pressure required to push a bullet down the barrel.

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  • 241 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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