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Workers 'are More Stressed And Worried About Keeping Their Jobs Than Ever Before'

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The report I saw said that public sector were more fearful than private. Unbelievable.

Why? I work in the public sector, and about a third of the staff in my department are due to leave in the next 12 months (including me) because there is no funding to support our positions. In general the most recent hires are the first to go. Thankfully there appears to be enough funding to keep all of the middle managers on.

Edited by Dorkins

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Why? I work in the public sector, and about a third of the staff in my department are due to leave in the next 12 months (including me) because there is no funding to support our positions. Thankfully there appears to be enough funding to keep all of the middle managers on.

Also my experience.

And those remaining are doing more work for less money and would love to leave. The nice cushy number that the public sector has been for years is no more in most parts of the country.

Unless you're at exec level where you get paid far more than your worth and a massive pension. Same for schools, hard work for teachers, more money for heads.

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The report I saw said that public sector were more fearful than private. Unbelievable.

Hardly a surprise. I think my public sector org's downsized over 20% of our staff in the last four years, they're trying to keep as many as possible of the ones left but the unions are terrifying workers (e.g. protests organised about ending overtime - so if it's kept it more people will lose jobs to pay for those left). Combination of past losses, and unions stirring equals a very fearful workforce.

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EDIT: Just to add I am sorry for anyone who loses their job or is living in fear of doing so. It's a mess not of their doing on the whole.

The only time you can be free of fear of losing your job is when you don't have a job to lose ...

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The only time you can be free of fear of losing your job is when you don't have a job to lose ...

then you have the fear of losing benefits...

...hang on, if that happened the MP's heads would be put on stakes by hungry peasants :P

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Guest eight

Also my experience.

And those remaining are doing more work for less money and would love to leave. The nice cushy number that the public sector has been for years is no more in most parts of the country.

Unless you're at exec level where you get paid far more than your worth and a massive pension. Same for schools, hard work for teachers, more money for heads.

My wife was made redundant from a public sector role but redeployed within the council. Her old manager is forever ringing her up "for advise". Tricky to just tell them to eff off as ultimately she still works for the same employer, albeit in a different department.

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My wife was made redundant from a public sector role but redeployed within the council. Her old manager is forever ringing her up "for advise". Tricky to just tell them to eff off as ultimately she still works for the same employer, albeit in a different department.

I imagine that whoever manages the budget for her current position wouldn't be too thrilled about someone else using one of his/her resources for free.

With that in mind, my advice to the former boss would be "Don't sack people that you can't do without".

I have a lot of visibility into the public sector and I don't see any sign of job losses looming. Plenty of lazy and downright incompetent people with a huge sense of entitlement, however. Most of them wouldn't last a week in a job in the commercial sector.

Still, I guess their 'job' keeps them off benefits and helps spread the money confiscated from the productive sector through taxation around the economy (by them spending it). But better not to tax the productive so much in the first place and force the wastes of space to make themselves employable and productive themselves, IMO.

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Guest eight

I imagine that whoever manages the budget for her current position wouldn't be too thrilled about someone else using one of his/her resources for free.

With that in mind, my advice to the former boss would be "Don't sack people that you can't do without".

I have a lot of visibility into the public sector and I don't see any sign of job losses looming. Plenty of lazy and downright incompetent people with a huge sense of entitlement, however. Most of them wouldn't last a week in a job in the commercial sector.

Still, I guess their 'job' keeps them off benefits and helps spread the money confiscated from the productive sector through taxation around the economy (by them spending it). But better not to tax the productive so much in the first place and force the wastes of space to make themselves employable and productive themselves, IMO.

From my window into the public sector I agree with most of that. There have been job losses though - but it just goes to show how criminally overstaffed they were in the first place. Bear in mind that the organisation my OH worked for - Surestart - barely existed 10 years ago you can imagine just how many non jobs were created and in such a short space of time.

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I guess since everyone is already stressed about losing their job there's no harm in filling your boots with debt via 'right to buy' :lol: After all you can only go bust once.

It will be interesting to see if Osbourne's latest wheeze to purchase the next election is undermined by the scaremongering he indulged in to sell his other cunning plan- operation Austerity.

Scaring people about the future was never the smartest way to kickstart the economy;

" You're all doomed- now go and f*cking buy something- preferably using lots of credit." :lol:

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It will be interesting to see if Osbourne's latest wheeze to purchase the next election is undermined by the scaremongering he indulged in to sell his other cunning plan- operation Austerity.

Scaring people about the future was never the smartest way to kickstart the economy;

It's not just about words. People can be scared for the future because they experience a falling demand and/or price for their labour firsthand. No amount of happy talk can stave off price discovery forever.

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Guest eight

With their spelling, I assume? ;)

Genuine typo, honest. Unless I've caught something off the internet?

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It's not just about words. People can be scared for the future because they experience a falling demand and/or price for their labour firsthand. No amount of happy talk can stave off price discovery forever.

True- for that you need QE.

What makes me laugh is the utter inconsistency of it all. Osbourne spends years bleating on about the need for the UK to present itself as a serious and responsible player to the bond markets- lest our borrowing costs should rise.

Then a election hoves into view and it's all forgotten as billions of dodgy mortgage lending is now to be underwritten by the state. :lol::lol::lol:

These people have no principles of any sort- they are short term opportunist morons.

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  • 243 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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