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motch

Will The Coastline Ever Be Artificially Extended Out For Miles In The Future?

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Just watched Time Team on TV. Many years ago large areas of Land now undersea on the suffolk Cost around Dunwich.

In the future with the big increases in population expected, could there be a big land reclaim from the sea, to help with the growing population?

Not just Suffolk, but other places as well

Edited by motch

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Just watched Time Team on TV. Many years ago large areas of Land now undersea on the suffolk Cost around Dunwich.

In the future with the big increases in population expected, could there be a big land reclaim from the sea, to help with the growing population?

Not just Suffolk, but other places as well

Given rising sea levels, I think that we're more likely to be struggling to hold on to what we have,

Peter.

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Imagine trying to get it passed the NIMBYS with sea views.

No chance.

PAST! PAST!

goes off for a lie down. :angry:

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Can't see it, I've read some detailed council proposals for spending money on sea defences this year and they are pretty miserly. Mostly spending a small bit now to patch up and kicking the can of major sea defence work many years down the line. And reading between the lines that fingers-crossed there are no big storms between now and then.

Anyway there's no shortage of land to build on in East Anglia, there's vast amounts and it's all flat. Sort out the planning laws and build away.

To mark 10,000 of the best ever posts on an internet forum ;)

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In the future with the big increases in population expected, could there be a big land reclaim from the sea, to help with the growing population?

Holland seems to have managed it, and of course there's Boris Island.

I imagine the Wash could be reclaimed almost entirely.

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Anyway there's no shortage of land to build on in East Anglia, there's vast amounts and it's all flat. Sort out the planning laws and build away.

In 50 years most of East Anglia will be under several feet of water. You see, pumping the water out to drain the fields for crops resulted in all the land settling. Now half of it is below sea level.

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I think you will find that large areas of the UK will simply be given up to the sea.

In places like Norfolk there is also the green lobby who are quaintly returning arable farmland to marshes - perhaps our descendents will regret that move when the UK population is much larger and food resources are harder to come by.

There is a part of North Gower, on the loughor estuary, that is basically getting closer and closer to returning to the sea IMPO, and probably will do so in my lifetime. I was speaking to one of those environmental agency bods who said that it would cost many millions to protect two small village on North Gower. Oddly enough, house prices are plunging in those two areas.

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Holland seems to have managed it, and of course there's Boris Island.

I imagine the Wash could be reclaimed almost entirely.

The amount of resources you'd need in order to protect against a North Sea storm surge....Probably be cheaper to dam off the North Sea and drain it a little... ;)

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The amount of resources you'd need in order to protect against a North Sea storm surge....Probably be cheaper to dam off the North Sea and drain it a little... ;)

As I said, Holland seems to manage, and anyway earth banks actually aren't that expensive (relatively speaking).

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In 50 years most of East Anglia will be under several feet of water. You see, pumping the water out to drain the fields for crops resulted in all the land settling. Now half of it is below sea level.

Yes, which is why I was wondering if several miles out a huge Dutch style project would ever come to fruition. Miles and miles of the east Anglian coast is pan flat only a few feet above sea level, with land below sea level as you say. Only about a 1000 years it was the mainland before it was all washed away/eroded by the sea, so perhaps less issues with other countries saying we're trying to pinch the sea off Mainland Europe.

The Wash would be a huge piece of land as another poster stated.

With population ever increasing and supposedly huge increases in the south/east anglia areas. Plus keeping enough food in production in case of any import issues/wars in the future.

I'm not saying we should destroy all the coastline and wildlife habitat, but if push came to shove, who knows.

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As I said, Holland seems to manage, and anyway earth banks actually aren't that expensive (relatively speaking).

They are the experts in water pumping as most of their country is below sea level

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Just watched Time Team on TV. Many years ago large areas of Land now undersea on the suffolk Cost around Dunwich.

In the future with the big increases in population expected, could there be a big land reclaim from the sea, to help with the growing population?

Not just Suffolk, but other places as well

What big increases in population? Once the baby boomer generation pops their collective clogs, surely population starts to fall?

Net migration is already falling (not because the tories have actually bothered to check whose coming it, but rather a pound isnt really worth much any more so salaries arent as internationally attractive, so i doubt that'll reverse under a labour govt - if anything a 70s style brain drain might become more likely)

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In 50 years most of East Anglia will be under several feet of water. You see, pumping the water out to drain the fields for crops resulted in all the land settling. Now half of it is below sea level.

Presumably as it all gets wet again, it will rise up again?

I've always quite liked the "waterworld" scenario. I don't see why quite large outposts based on oil-rig type structures, or mayby floating concrete hulls couldn't be made.

or what about filling up the Irish Sea with rubble. It must be a bit calmer there than in the north sea.

Off topic, but: when I look out to the north sea of the Scottish coast with my opera glasses (don't know what they are, mybe 3x), even when the sea seems pretty calm, I seem (always) to be able to see absolutely massive waves on the horizon. Is that real or is it some sort of optical illusion?

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Presumably as it all gets wet again, it will rise up again?

I've always quite liked the "waterworld" scenario. I don't see why quite large outposts based on oil-rig type structures, or mayby floating concrete hulls couldn't be made.

or what about filling up the Irish Sea with rubble. It must be a bit calmer there than in the north sea.

Off topic, but: when I look out to the north sea of the Scottish coast with my opera glasses (don't know what they are, mybe 3x), even when the sea seems pretty calm, I seem (always) to be able to see absolutely massive waves on the horizon. Is that real or is it some sort of optical illusion?

Even the worst predictions for sea level rise will only occur in 500-1000 years time. Given that all developed countries have below replacement level birth rates, and most developing countries are falling to near replacement level, its pretty likely the population by then will be far below what it is today.

In other words, sea level rises, in a practical sense, are a non-issue.

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I think that sea levels around the UK are a bit more complicated.

Although global sea levels are rising, in the case of Scotland, the land is also rising, because the land mass is still slowly recovering from the weight of ice on it in the last ice age.

The area of Suffolk around Dunwich, Southwold, etc ('Sole Bay' - but not a bay any more because of coastal erosion) is very interesting. Most of Dunwich has gone. There was one remaining church that fell into the sea about a century ago, and most of the churchyard, except one grave, has gone. An old lady in Southwold told me that as a child, after a storm, she and her friends would cycle down to Dunwich to see if any skeletons were visible poking out of the cliff.

North of Southwold, at Easton Bavents, a few homes remain, perilously close to the edge of the sandstone cliffs. Further north again, at Covehithe, the road goes straight over the cliff edge. A look at recent maps will show you how much, and how fast, land is being lost to the sea there.

In the last ice age, a lot of Britain was unavailable for development of housing estates as it was under a couple of km of ice, but then, with lower sea levels, much of what is now the bed of the North Sea was land.

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Even the worst predictions for sea level rise will only occur in 500-1000 years time.

I don't know where your predictions are from, but they are a load of crap.

Areas like East Anglia and Bangladesh are facing massive problems what will come to a head within 100 years.

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I don't know where your predictions are from, but they are a load of crap.

Areas like East Anglia and Bangladesh are facing massive problems what will come to a head within 100 years.

And for the Maldives, even sooner.

BTW having been to Felixtowe I think I would prefer to live in Bangaladesh.

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There was an interesting article recently in New Scientist on the effect of the gravitatiional attractiion between the ice caps and the sea. I can't link it, as it's behind a pay wall. Sea levels are higher near big ice caps because of the gravitational attractiion from the massive mass of ice. When the ice caps melt, this attractiion is gone, and the local sea level falls. So Scotland might get some more land.

Edited by SpectrumFX

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There was an interesting article recently in New Scientist on the effect of the gravitatiional attractiion between the ice caps and the sea. I can't link it, as it's behind a pay wall. Sea levels are higher near big ice caps because of the gravitational attractiion from the massive mass of ice. When the ice caps melt, this attractiion is gone, and the local sea level falls. So Scotland might get some more land.

I think Scotland is rising ever so slightly and the south falling slightly into the sea as time goes by, so I was lead to believe, perhaps it's just the above.

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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