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EU - Absurd ban on olive oil jugs & dipping bowls at restaurants tables

“The small glass jugs filled with green or gold coloured extra virgin olive oil are familiar and traditional for restaurant goers across Europe but they will be banned from 1 January 2014 after a decision taken in an obscure Brussels committee earlier this week.

From next year olive oil “presented at a restaurant table” must be in pre-packaged, factory bottles with a tamper-proof dispensing nozzle and labelling in line with EU industrial standards.

The use of classic, refillable glass jugs or glazed terracotta dipping bowls and the choice of a restaurateur to buy olive oil from a small artisan producer or family business will be outlawed.

The decision, which will be automatically adopted by the commission in next few days, has dismayed many officials who are concerned that a ban crafted to help industry will damage the reputation of the EU at a time of growing hostility to Brussels bureaucrats.

Blink

You'll be needing tamper-proof, EU-labelled vinegar on yer chips next.

Worth every penny of the extra 700m the EU wants from Cameron, doncha thunk?

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This is clearly a very important issue and one that must be dealt with.

50%+ youth unemployment in Greece, Spain etc etc can wait until another day.

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Well thats what the eu is for - big companies flourish along with the lobbyists and politicians that work for them, whereas the small guy is eliminated from the game.

When I visit my mum in Spain, I get some great oil from a small producer who doesn't have any bottling or labelling facilities. You just bring your container and they fill it up. I expect they'll be put out of business, but for the probability that they'll have the good sense to ignore it.

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Well thats what the eu is for - big companies flourish along with the lobbyists and politicians that work for them, whereas the small guy is eliminated from the game.

Just wait till they discover some horse pi$$ in it a couple of years down the line. :lol:

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I think the problem was that the "extra virgin" olive oil in question is frequently not "extra virgin", or even "virgin", but has in fact already been round the block a few times. Does seem a bit heavy-handed though - as long as the stuff's not actually poisonous, I'd say caveat emptor.

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the "extra virgin" in question is frequently not "extra virgin", or even "virgin", but has in fact already been round the block a few times.

A common problem ...

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I think the problem was that the "extra virgin" olive oil in question is frequently not "extra virgin", or even "virgin", but has in fact already been round the block a few times. Does seem a bit heavy-handed though - as long as the stuff's not actually poisonous, I'd say caveat emptor.

Quite.....if it works why fix it?.......what will they be cooking with in the kitchen I wonder, the sealed, labelled branded more expensive stuff (not necessarily better quality) or the locally produced stuff they have always used for generations without any problem? ;)

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I think the problem was that the "extra virgin" olive oil in question is frequently not "extra virgin", or even "virgin", but has in fact already been round the block a few times. Does seem a bit heavy-handed though - as long as the stuff's not actually poisonous, I'd say caveat emptor.

Pomace oil can have nasties in I suppose. Pomace

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Pomace oil can have nasties in I suppose. Pomace

A fish supper or chips cooked in old oil is a lot worse for you, as is the case with most restaurants.

If its not clear and golden its bad for your health to fry in it.

So is alcohol, tobacco, HFCS, all the E-number preservatives.

Stupid EU policy.

Some bureaucrat's kid has a company that containerises small amounts of food.

One good thing is that I won't make the mistake of putting oil on my supper thinking it was malt vinegar, as I have done on numerous occasions.

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EU - Absurd ban on olive oil jugs & dipping bowls at restaurants tables

Blink

You'll be needing tamper-proof, EU-labelled vinegar on yer chips next.

Worth every penny of the extra 700m the EU wants from Cameron, doncha thunk?

seems a sensible policy, employing and paying apparatchiks to come up with the big decisions like this,

Once again you guys are looking at the small picture, i believe the implementation is because a lot of small restaurateurs were swapping the virgin olive oil in terracotta bowls with red diesel as the the absorption level in terracotta is similar for both,

Surely only a matter of time before prima nocta is reintroduced and snowflux pops up to say its not really that bad in the scheme of things compared to the alternative like

Edited by georgia o'keeffe

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The subtitle is "no I'm not making this up", when the headline is a straightforward lie.

You can have as much olive oil on your salad as you like. And now, you'll be doing from a bottle that tells you where the oil's from, and what type it is. And if you're doing it in a restaurant, the bottle will have a tamper-proof lid so they can't easily refill it with re-used chip oil from next door.

The regulations were passed by the management committee on agriculture, at which the Uk votes, the draft proposal has been out since February, and the formal notification of th result will be in the 1st June OJEU.

Not that this story, or the hopeless sensationalism the europhobes are going for, have anything to do with house prices & the economy.

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The subtitle is "no I'm not making this up", when the headline is a straightforward lie.

You can have as much olive oil on your salad as you like. And now, you'll be doing from a bottle that tells you where the oil's from, and what type it is. And if you're doing it in a restaurant, the bottle will have a tamper-proof lid so they can't easily refill it with re-used chip oil from next door.

The regulations were passed by the management committee on agriculture, at which the Uk votes, the draft proposal has been out since February, and the formal notification of th result will be in the 1st June OJEU.

Not that this story, or the hopeless sensationalism the europhobes are going for, have anything to do with house prices & the economy.

Are containers often refilled with used chip oil from next door? That might be quite obvious, surely?

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Pomace oil can have nasties in I suppose. Pomace

But according to your link, it was formerly 0.25% of world production. Since then appropriate PAH levels were set in 2001.

Some bureaucrat's kid has a company that containerises small amounts of food.

More like it.

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I'm confused.

They say it's because the oil in the container may not be what it says it is, but since it is unmarked and doesn't sat what it is, it could be anything, hence the need for miniature sealed bottles clearly marked with the description of the contents :blink:.

Jobs for the boys, next they'll ban tap water in a jug in restaurants and insist that all water served must be bottled and paid for. More money spent and more jobs for the inspectors who make sure that it is being spent.

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this is not a health issue it is a lobbying and protectionism issue.

"Italy, which produces an average 500,000 tons of olive oil a year (of which 60 per cent is extra virgin) was one of the 15 member states to back the initiative (along with Spain, Greece, Portugal, France, Ireland, Cyprus, Slovenia, Slovakia, Poland, Romania and Malta). The decision was opposed by mostly northern members (Germany, Denmark, Netherlands, Bulgaria, Estonia, Luxembourg, Austria, Finland and Sweden)." the UK abstained.

can anyone see a connection as to why olive oil producing Mediterranean countries would formulate and back such an EU law. coincidence maybe?

it seems olive oil health and safety concerns dont really occur in the North of europe but it does in olive oil producing southern EU countries and we must be protected.

Edited by mfp123

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EU - Absurd ban on olive oil jugs & dipping bowls at restaurants tables

Blink

You'll be needing tamper-proof, EU-labelled vinegar on yer chips next.

Worth every penny of the extra 700m the EU wants from Cameron, doncha thunk?

Mischievous ploy from the EU to see how swivel eyed the swivel eyed loonies can get. Now mind your blood pressure folks. :lol:

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Now mind your blood pressure folks. :lol:

Salt will be next, is that really sea salt in that shaker? even if it is, it probably needs a health warning.

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Salt will be next, is that really sea salt in that shaker? even if it is, it probably needs a health warning.

What about the ban on bent bananas and cucumbers? ;)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/2453204/Bent-banana-and-curved-cucumber-rules-dropped-by-EU.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/eu/8897662/EU-bans-claim-that-water-can-prevent-dehydration.html

Edited by winkie

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Nevertheless, a lot of bent ones still seem to be slipping though. Almost as if there was no ban.

They banned the ban because it was so stupid....must have altogether cost plenty, very wasteful, what's new. ;)

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I think the problem was that the "extra virgin" olive oil in question is frequently not "extra virgin", or even "virgin", but has in fact already been round the block a few times. Does seem a bit heavy-handed though - as long as the stuff's not actually poisonous, I'd say caveat emptor.

If people were so bothered about it, they would only go to restaurants who used labelled products already.

For example, some cafe/restaurants have little sachets of red/brown sauce, others have bottles which could be resealed and in some cases you get it in a small, unbranded, bowl. If anyone was really that concerned about the sauce, they would either take their own and/or avoid the establishment.

Hell, if it became a big issue and there was demand for a certified sauce/oil/condiment system, then I'm sure it would make economic sense for cafe/restaurants to sign up. People could then frequent their establishment, safe in the knowledge that their food would only be complimented by certified products.

But no... we get another threat. Another 'do this or else!' rule slapped on something, decided arbitrarily by some bureaucrats. Yay! <_<

Edited by Traktion

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  • 246 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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