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Dogs & Cats Living In Flats

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In the UK, is it commonplace for dogs to be officially allowed to live in private apartments?

Here in Poland, I'm at my 3rd estate of private apartments and yet again awful noise from dogs barking and going up and down the stairs all day (when they don't use the lift!)

Most estates have dog areas, as well as fenced off child areas because most estates here overrun with young children everywhere, noisily playing various ball games, or just making a nuisance of themselves. Also a fair number of hoodies and the like hanging out and boozing in the children's play areas at night, along with their fighting dogs.

Most of the ordinary pet dogs belonging to residents can at times be heard barking and barking, some are left out on balconies for hours, early morning, late at night, and you always see some owner or the other coming along with their dog on a long leash. Poles love their dogs and it seems almost everyone has a dog. Cats seem somewhat less popular compared to Britain but that's just an anecdote as I don't have the stats on cats :)

Hit the parks and among the mass of joggers and loads of mountain bikers, every other person has a dog in tow. So, unsurprisingly, dogs are officially allowed in flats here unless a landlord says no.

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Manchester banned dogs in tower blocks about 20 years ago I think.

Doesn't mean people don't try it on. And my argument in favour is - if a dog is quiet and you don't know its there then it may as well be there.

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Manchester banned dogs in tower blocks about 20 years ago I think.

Doesn't mean people don't try it on. And my argument in favour is - if a dog is quiet and you don't know its there then it may as well be there.

Very few dogs here are quiet, although I'd hate for anyone to give a dog away if it ended up put down, so I don't complain about dog noise, see

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2254729/RSPCA-destroys-HALF-animals-rescues--thousands-completely-healthy.html

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Perhaps they have not been trained well.

I lived in a block about 18 years ago where a block had a dog. I only found out about it one day when I decided to use the stairs and bumped into him.

There's been no sign or sound of it for months.

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Pets are allowed in most council houses and low rise flats. Private landlord and Housing Associations tend to be more strict

I rent a ground floor flat on a private AST basis through a Housing Association. Pets are allowed so long as the Landlord is informed.

My upstairs neighbour have a dog. This wouldn't be a problem if only the flats had decent soundproofing between each floor. I can even hear my upstairs neighbours bouncing a ball on the carpet (I suspect no underlay) and the dog scurrying around the living room. I don't hear it bark very often. I'm not going to complain as I would like to move in the next few months and don't want to cause any rifts in the meantime.

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When I lived in Bromley, we had cats, so we got a ground floor flat, where we could open the windows!

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This is just plain silly.

I know people like to treat their pets like humans, but dogs and cats living in flats ?

How would they pay the bills ? And has anyone ever seen a cat manage a doorlock or use a cooker ?

Please let's have some common sense on this.

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This is just plain silly.

I know people like to treat their pets like humans, but dogs and cats living in flats ?

How would they pay the bills ? And has anyone ever seen a cat manage a doorlock or use a cooker ?

Please let's have some common sense on this.

I would of got Bats in there as well - Dogs,Cats and Bats Living in Flats.

Our new puppy is in with us at our top floor flat. As of last tuesday. Allowed to have a small/medium size dog in the flats as long as no noise/disturbance, so hopefully we can train her ok. I'm an owner (mortgage) not sure how many Landlords allow dogs but not many i'd say. Although you could get away with it i'd suppose.

there's a couple of other dogs in my block out of 24 flats, well i've only seen 2 others anyway.

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Rhyming thread titles are the best kind. We need another one about Demis and Lemmies living in semis.

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We took on a rescue dog about 15 years ago. He was a 5 year old German Shepard. He was living in a block of flats and the owners idea of taking him for a walk was to put him in the lift on the 4th floor and press ground. He would then go outside on his own, do his business and walk back up the stairs. Complete scum bags... We loved him to bits, he had his own garden and gave us so much pleasure in his final 6 years years....

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It's very common here in Toronto and landlords are not allowed put a no-pet restriction in leases either. The apartment block I lived in when I first moved here had quite a few dogs and loads of cats but, being a nice middle class sort of place I guess, they didn't cause any trouble at all.

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Rhyming thread titles are the best kind. We need another one about Demis and Lemmies living in semis.

sam-i-am-happy.png

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Our neighbour has a lovely dog and lives by himself following the breakup of his marriage.

I think he takes the dog to work with him most days, but now and again it does get left in the house when it tends to have barking sessions.

Actually, the noise of the barking annoys me less than the fact that the dog is upset and feels the need to bark, but to be fair to the guy, he's on his own and more than doing his best.

Actually he could ask us to be more active in helping look after it, but he tends not to talk to us all that much.

We have two cats. They do not bark or cause problems.

Except for when our neighbour lets his chickens run round the garden. I wouldn't leave them unattended anyway since we have a pair of sparrowhawks in residence this year and the female would easily have one of the chickens away. But I do, in return, worry about what our cats might do to them.

I'm not a dog person but I'd think that some dogs can be trusted to be quiet as long as you don't leave them alone much and maybe some breeds don't take well to that, in the same way that some cat breeds are "indoor only" breeds with no desire to go outside (ideal for people who live in flats).

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Our neighbour has a lovely dog and lives by himself following the breakup of his marriage.

I think he takes the dog to work with him most days, but now and again it does get left in the house when it tends to have barking sessions.

Actually, the noise of the barking annoys me less than the fact that the dog is upset and feels the need to bark, but to be fair to the guy, he's on his own and more than doing his best.

Actually he could ask us to be more active in helping look after it, but he tends not to talk to us all that much.

We have two cats. They do not bark or cause problems.

Except for when our neighbour lets his chickens run round the garden. I wouldn't leave them unattended anyway since we have a pair of sparrowhawks in residence this year and the female would easily have one of the chickens away. But I do, in return, worry about what our cats might do to them.

I'm not a dog person but I'd think that some dogs can be trusted to be quiet as long as you don't leave them alone much and maybe some breeds don't take well to that, in the same way that some cat breeds are "indoor only" breeds with no desire to go outside (ideal for people who live in flats).

We have just taken on a lovely little puppy dog. I'm a little concerned about leaving her alone during the day as we both work. Hopefully we can leave her with firends/relatives at times or might just get a Lady in who walks them for an hour for a tenner, this would make it quite pricey over time though.

I do see the occassional "devil cat" around although they never bark.

Something I was concerned about regarding Birds of Prey.We have a big balcony where the puppy is out on sometimes, only threat is from above as we live about 40 foot up and plenty of pigeons around. So, could a big bird of prey have a crack at our puppy?

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Something I was concerned about regarding Birds of Prey.We have a big balcony where the puppy is out on sometimes, only threat is from above as we live about 40 foot up and plenty of pigeons around. So, could a big bird of prey have a crack at our puppy?

It depends what kinds of raptors you have around your place and the size of the dog. Peregrines, which like to hang around tall buildings, would be unlikely to take a puppy unless it was something truly small (e.g. baby Yorkshire Terrier) and I don't think any of the larger birds would come close enough to take an interest. In the very unlikely event there are any eagle owls around (North Yorks only I think) you might need to be careful.

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I find making my own noise makes other neighbours noise more acceptable. As such I have my computer bark, cough and `flush the loo` loudly and randomly using wav and mp3 files.

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It depends what kinds of raptors you have around your place and the size of the dog. Peregrines, which like to hang around tall buildings, would be unlikely to take a puppy unless it was something truly small (e.g. baby Yorkshire Terrier) and I don't think any of the larger birds would come close enough to take an interest. In the very unlikely event there are any eagle owls around (North Yorks only I think) you might need to be careful.

+1

The female sparrowhawks are absolutely huge compared with the males. The last one I saw in our garden took a collared dove one day and a woodpigeon on another. They must be living in the trees alongside the house as we've had quite a few "attacks".

While I suspect that one might be physically capable of taking a very small kitten or puppy, lifting becomes an issue above a certain weight as does what the prey might be able to do to it. (Although as an irony both our cats are terrified of pheasants, as they've had some bad experiences with them!)

And sparrowhawks are very much more likely to be in gardens or parks looking for sparrows or similar (neighbour's chickens would be very tasty I'm sure) than trying to take things from balconies.

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It depends what kinds of raptors you have around your place and the size of the dog. Peregrines, which like to hang around tall buildings, would be unlikely to take a puppy unless it was something truly small (e.g. baby Yorkshire Terrier) and I don't think any of the larger birds would come close enough to take an interest. In the very unlikely event there are any eagle owls around (North Yorks only I think) you might need to be careful.

Puppy about 8lb in weight and growing quickly now, about 2 months old. Live in East Anglia area. In a Town area so i'd guess a big bird of Prey wouldn't like it there, too much distraction with traffic ?

While seeing a Bird of Prey display at Stonham Barns a couple of wild ones were flying nearby about 1000 feet overhead. So got me wondering.

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Puppy about 8lb in weight and growing quickly now, about 2 months old. Live in East Anglia area. In a Town area so i'd guess a big bird of Prey wouldn't like it there, too much distraction with traffic ?

While seeing a Bird of Prey display at Stonham Barns a couple of wild ones were flying nearby about 1000 feet overhead. So got me wondering.

I used to see the odd sparrowhawk around Cambridge when I lived there and we had barn owls too but neither of them could take something weighing 8 pounds. If you're in town I think you're pretty safe. Here in Toronto we get the occasional bald eagle which have been known to take very small dogs elsewhere but I've never heard of a case locally.

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... in the same way that some cat breeds are "indoor only" breeds with no desire to go outside (ideal for people who live in flats).

I don't see that there's any such thing as a born 'indoor' cat. IMO it's cruel to keep any cat permanently indoors. Of course they have no desire to go outside if they've never been allowed to. My sister in law regularly fosters rescue cats that have been kept in tower blocks for years - one poor animal had been cooped up in a high-rise flat for nine years - and naturally they're petrified of the outside at first. It takes her a lot of patience to get them used to it before re-homing, and once they are used to it of course they enjoy being outside, the same as any other cat.

IMO people just call them 'indoor cats' because they want to justify keeping them cooped up indoors for ever.

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I don't see that there's any such thing as a born 'indoor' cat. IMO it's cruel to keep any cat permanently indoors. Of course they have no desire to go outside if they've never been allowed to. My sister in law regularly fosters rescue cats that have been kept in tower blocks for years - one poor animal had been cooped up in a high-rise flat for nine years - and naturally they're petrified of the outside at first. It takes her a lot of patience to get them used to it before re-homing, and once they are used to it of course they enjoy being outside, the same as any other cat.

IMO people just call them 'indoor cats' because they want to justify keeping them cooped up indoors for ever.

I wish all cats were kept in doors. Would mean I didn't have to constantly clean up the mess they leave in my garden. Cat owners may then appreciate what a nuisance their beloved pussies are then.

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I wish all cats were kept in doors. Would mean I didn't have to constantly clean up the mess they leave in my garden. Cat owners may then appreciate what a nuisance their beloved pussies are then.

this following cat would of wished it was kept indoors... Many years ago a relation of mine out digging his garden over with a fork, one of the neighbours cat kept pooing everywhere, he had enough and chucked the fork across the garden at it, just wanting to scare it off, but he speared the poor thing right through and it died.

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+1

The female sparrowhawks are absolutely huge compared with the males. The last one I saw in our garden took a collared dove one day and a woodpigeon on another. They must be living in the trees alongside the house as we've had quite a few "attacks".

While I suspect that one might be physically capable of taking a very small kitten or puppy, lifting becomes an issue above a certain weight as does what the prey might be able to do to it. (Although as an irony both our cats are terrified of pheasants, as they've had some bad experiences with them!)

And sparrowhawks are very much more likely to be in gardens or parks looking for sparrows or similar (neighbour's chickens would be very tasty I'm sure) than trying to take things from balconies.

They eat the collared doves round here ... And sit in the back garden pulling them apart.

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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