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How Tight Fisted Are You?

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Recently I've become obsessed with saving money.

An example - just before Christmas I volunteered to do a bit of Sunday work in a local charity shop, as many of our donations are dropped off in black plastic sacks I realised that instead of chucking them I could re-use the decents ones at home and stop buying them by the roll. (I must be the only charity shop worker in England that helps himself to the bags rather than the donations, lol)

In terms of tight fisted-ness can anyone top this? I would like a few more hints and tiips from the HPC massive :P

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Recently I've become obsessed with saving money.

An example - just before Christmas I volunteered to do a bit of Sunday work in a local charity shop, as many of our donations are dropped off in black plastic sacks I realised that instead of chucking them I could re-use the decents ones at home and stop buying them by the roll. (I must be the only charity shop worker in England that helps himself to the bags rather than the donations, lol)

In terms of tight fisted-ness can anyone top this? I would like a few more hints and tiips from the HPC massive :P

Execellent post!

A few of mine.

I have trained my bowels to take advantage of work rather than home facilities saving on paper and water plus getting paid for the call of nature!

Charging my mobile in the work car rather than my own car or at home.

Refilling empty mineral water bottles from the dispenser at work to carry in the car.

pissing in the watering can for the plants in the garden - rather than buy feed.

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Recently I've become obsessed with saving money.

An example - just before Christmas I volunteered to do a bit of Sunday work in a local charity shop, as many of our donations are dropped off in black plastic sacks I realised that instead of chucking them I could re-use the decents ones at home and stop buying them by the roll. (I must be the only charity shop worker in England that helps himself to the bags rather than the donations, lol)

In terms of tight fisted-ness can anyone top this? I would like a few more hints and tiips from the HPC massive :P

Sounds perfectly sensible and normal to me, in terms of not wasting perfectly good bags (nowt to do with the cost). I have a big supply of black plastic bags for re-use now 'cos I used them to pack a lot of my clothes and bedding for the house move.

My parents never use black plastic bags, but re-use supermarket carrier bags for rubbish instead. Works where they live 'cos collection is from big skip-like thingies by the roadside into which residents chuck their rubbish.

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In terms of tight fisted-ness can anyone top this? I would like a few more hints and tiips from the HPC massive :P

There are lots of things you should re-use rather than throw away.

Kurt already said water bottles, but there's much more. OTTOMH,

  • Don't buy vinegar. Use the vinegar from your pickled onions!

  • Buy soup inna plastic container, re-use it for your own soups, or anything else you brew up in bulk and freeze.

  • Re-use glass jars for your own chutneys, jams, honey, etc.

  • If you buy a supermarket quiche, wash up the foil tray it comes in for re-use.

  • Re-use supermarket plastic bags, and take a couple with you when you go to local shops rather than pick up more. Just beware of the supposedly eco-friendly ones (like the co-op's) that disintegrate on you after a year or two.

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Guest eight

Sounds perfectly sensible and normal to me, in terms of not wasting perfectly good bags (nowt to do with the cost). I have a big supply of black plastic bags for re-use now 'cos I used them to pack a lot of my clothes and bedding for the house move.

My parents never use black plastic bags, but re-use supermarket carrier bags for rubbish instead. Works where they live 'cos collection is from big skip-like thingies by the roadside into which residents chuck their rubbish.

I use charity bags that come through the door as bin bags. NE Air Ambulance ones are particularly good and they obviously can't miss them as they continue to shove them through with abandon.

I'm currently trying to save up enough cans to make it worthwhile weighing them in at the scrappers rather than taking them to recycling.

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Execellent post!

A few of mine.

I have trained my bowels to take advantage of work rather than home facilities saving on paper and water plus getting paid for the call of nature!

Charging my mobile in the work car rather than my own car or at home.

Refilling empty mineral water bottles from the dispenser at work to carry in the car.

pissing in the watering can for the plants in the garden - rather than buy feed.

I salute you sir. Training your bowels to take advantage of work facilities? You're truly a money saving veteran!

I've started to charge my phone at work too to save on the electricity, they give me v.little in terms of pay so I make sure I take everything I can get my hands on.

Obviously I shop in the evenings to take advantage of any price reductions. Only last night Tesco reduced the meatballs in their Finest range from £4 to £0.95 and they also were on 3 for 2, so I ended up paying £0.63 a pack and bought 6 :)

I can't help myself when I see a bargain like that.

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Bags for rubbish?

You people are mad!

Get a bin that you can carry out to the actual bin and empty it in.

Adding extra plastic to landfill is a bad habit we really need to stop.

Wash out the bin and return it to its shiny overcoat in the kitchen. But no need for a plastic bag to wrap rubbish up.

If you're worried about stink put a tiny bit of washing powder in the bottom of the bin and it'll soak up any liquids from your rubbish.

Reusing bags and putting them into landfill isn't a useful use of them.

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The biggies have got to be:

find somewhere cheap to rent and haggle

don't have a car (I do and notice the regular big costs in addition to fuel) or if you must keep it until it falls apart

But I agree that the little things are best :)

I mend my clothes: my socks go on for ages.

I used to think that the £3 lunch deals from supermarkets were good value until I saw that rice/cous cous and fish was much nicer and came in at under a £1. That's a tenner a week saved.

Only have one or two pints down the pub. If you want more drink it beforehand or afterwards at less than a third of the price otherwise your wallet will empty at a rate of knots (well mine does anyway...)

Take drinks (plenty) and snacks on days out. I watch car racing and get through about four coffees. All free from my enormous flask as I watch people queue for the £1.50 a pop not very nice (I had it a couple of times) coffee from a van.

Only have two meals a day when on holiday: brunch and dinner.

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I salute you sir. Training your bowels to take advantage of work facilities? You're truly a money saving veteran!

I've started to charge my phone at work too to save on the electricity, they give me v.little in terms of pay so I make sure I take everything I can get my hands on.

Obviously I shop in the evenings to take advantage of any price reductions. Only last night Tesco reduced the meatballs in their Finest range from £4 to £0.95 and they also were on 3 for 2, so I ended up paying £0.63 a pack and bought 6 :)

I can't help myself when I see a bargain like that.

I honed my swooping skills in Tescos before moving and applying the same skills in Coles in Australia, A large freezer helps for taking advantage of what often equates to a 60-80% saving.

Decent sausages and chicken thighs get used as the meat component of home made lunches.

On the work front I have an insulated cup with a lid which allows me to make a coffee using work facilities and save on paying Mcd's or someone $4 for a cup later in the day.

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I'm very tightfisted when it comes to leftovers, or things getting a bit dried up in the fridge.

If I see any of the following : a few leftover boiled potatoes, one limp celery stalk, one sad old carrot, one rasher of slightly dried-up bacon or piece of ham, a small amount of any fresh veg, a little leftover rice or pasta, you name it, I think SOUP!

Lucikly Mr B will happily eat my infamous 'dustbin*' soups as often as you like.

*termed coined by my mother when she was particularly broke and made them often.

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I'm very tightfisted when it comes to leftovers, or things getting a bit dried up in the fridge.

If I see any of the following : a few leftover boiled potatoes, one limp celery stalk, one sad old carrot, one rasher of slightly dried-up bacon or piece of ham, a small amount of any fresh veg, a little leftover rice or pasta, you name it, I think SOUP!

Lucikly Mr B will happily eat my infamous 'dustbin*' soups as often as you like.

*termed coined by my mother when she was particularly broke and made them often.

Same here, I'm a bit of a fridge Nazi in that respect.

Same of the female members of my family are truly dreadful when it comes to basic fridge management. Instead of tailoring a meal around what's about to go bad they happily ignore it and get something out the freezer. I swear, I could live like a king from all the leftovers a couple of relatives throw away; untouched veg, bread that was never opened, meats, yoghurts, the list in endless!

I could never live with a person like that.

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I honed my swooping skills in Tescos before moving and applying the same skills in Coles in Australia, A large freezer helps for taking advantage of what often equates to a 60-80% saving.

Decent sausages and chicken thighs get used as the meat component of home made lunches.

On the work front I have an insulated cup with a lid which allows me to make a coffee using work facilities and save on paying Mcd's or someone $4 for a cup later in the day.

Even though my freezer is tiny I havn't paid the full price for an evening meal for a couple of months now. I would love a big chest freezer that I could stock to the gunnels but unfortunately I don't have the space. There are 2-3 supermarkets that I can hit in an evening all within a mile of each other and it's saved me a small fortune on my shopping bill, and with the small freezer I only have to go once or twice a week to keep stock levels high. B)

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Same here, I'm a bit of a fridge Nazi in that respect.

Same of the female members of my family are truly dreadful when it comes to basic fridge management. Instead of tailoring a meal around what's about to go bad they happily ignore it and get something out the freezer. I swear, I could live like a king from all the leftovers a couple of relatives throw away; untouched veg, bread that was never opened, meats, yoghurts, the list in endless!

I could never live with a person like that.

Indeedie. Keep a careful eye on fridge contents (and indeed non-fridge stuff like fresh fruit), and be sure to find a use for anything whose time is imminent. Bearing in mind that the dates on some foods are meaningless: at the extreme, if you have a jar of honey that's older than your granny, that's just fine.

Oh, and use the exact amount of water for a cuppa (my kettle makes that very easy with a one pint mark). Every extra milliliter adds to the cost of heating it up.

Don't turn on the hot tap when you're not running the water long enough for it to heat up - e.g. when washing hands or face. Don't run excess water either!

Optimise your cooking. Plan meals so you use either the oven or the hob, but not both. Hence for example if baking a pie or quiche, serve with baked spuds and maybe even a baked dessert to make best use of the oven. Or if steaming your veg, boil some pasta in the water underneath. It's a mindset that'll help with culinary creativity as well as economy!

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On water saving the Barlow household showers with two buckets in the shower to save some of the water. If I wee in it there is a triplicate saving in that I save on toilet flushing and plant food. I have also suggested (to Mrs KB's diasagreement) that we could also use for toilet flushing in wet weather.

Also the washing machine discharges into a barrel which is then used for the garden.

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This one is good for the TFH's as well.

Use short solar vacuum tubes for cooking / water boiling.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/10-units-of-Vacuum-Tubes-for-solar-water-heater-evacuated-tubes-for-solar-/230974817188?pt=AU_HotWaterSystems&hash=item35c72c03a4

These 500mm x 58mm are ideal as they contain about a litre. Filled with water or liquid food will come to the boil in 30-40 minutes in bright sunshine.

Ive solar cooked in Oz and the UK.

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On water saving the Barlow household showers with two buckets in the shower to save some of the water. If I wee in it there is a triplicate saving in that I save on toilet flushing and plant food. I have also suggested (to Mrs KB's diasagreement) that we could also use for toilet flushing in wet weather.

Also the washing machine discharges into a barrel which is then used for the garden.

If you're recycling the water can't you just re-route the waste pipes into a container? Or is the volume of water too much to store?

As I'm not on a water meter I don't tend to worry about cold water, hot water is a different story of course.

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If you're recycling the water can't you just re-route the waste pipes into a container? Or is the volume of water too much to store?

As I'm not on a water meter I don't tend to worry about cold water, hot water is a different story of course.

Rental

Besides ground floor so hassle would outweight any savings. Im most in favour of toilet flushing as the shower is next to the bog!

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I thought pickled onions was an extravagence.

Bread is an extravagence, when value-line pasta is so much cheaper.

Nothing against a bit of extravagence. Just don't waste it. Use the vinegar and re-use the jar and you've turned one purchase into three good things.

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I thought pickled onions was an extravagence.

Anything beyond oats, and the occasional lemon to ward off scurvy, is an extravagance.

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Only flushing the loo 'when absolutely necessary' . ;)

Switching off the electricity at the mains when not using appliances (when remembering to do so).

When driving, using the engine to slow down when coming up to queues, junctions, traffic lights, etc. Most motorists I observe tend to accelerate towards them and burn more fuel.

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Have you ever bought one in a chippy?

Who does? Bloomin' worth their weight in caviar.

Dunno, haven't been into a chippy in a long, long time.

Has the pickled onion ousted the wally, or do they coexist?

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There are lots of things you should re-use rather than throw away.

Use the vinegar from your pickled onions!

Pickled onions?!!

Are you a banker?

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Bread is an extravagence, when value-line pasta is so much cheaper.

Nothing against a bit of extravagence. Just don't waste it. Use the vinegar and re-use the jar and you've turned one purchase into three good things.

The shop-bought pickles I've bought over the last few years are in very diluted vinegar; hence the "once opened keep refrigerated and comsume within two weeks" instruction. Are there still pickles that are in actual vinegar?

On chip shops I have over the last year for the first time tried a pickled egg (like a hard boiled egg dipped in vinegar, not sure what I was expecting but very ordinary) and a deep fried Mars bar (incredibly rich, like a caramel-flavoured Christmas pud with caramel-flavoured brandy butter mixed into it). I might try the latter again.

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  • 242 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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