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crashmonitor

Average Brit Visits Gp Six Times A Year

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Just googled this information, and I really am not surprised.

Girlfriend was telling me what her colleagues at work make appointments for, basically the common cold, slightest back twinge etc.. etc. I think women are the worst.

I finally thought bloody hell I have been carrying a back injury for about ten years, not been to see a doctor for ten years (I am now nearly fifty) and meanwhile the average Brit has had sixty visits in that time, God knows what they think up to go in for.

When I went in to make the appointment the receptionist asked me which Doctor i wanted to see, tbh i didn't even know who the doctors were. I suppose you would get to know who to choose if you go six times a year.

My appointment is on 31st May, I suppose they have got their regulars.

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I haven't been for 26 years and even back then it was to get my passport thing signed.

I keep away from these people.

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Its mums and their sprogs....these children are dying one minute..100 temp, throwing up, then next minute running around like nothing happened.

Ive been 3 times since my accident.

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I haven't been for 26 years and even back then it was to get my passport thing signed.

I keep away from these people.

I agree which is why I haven't been for years. i doubt there is much they can do for a back injury in any case, and I would draw the line at taking prescription drugs.. Looks like you are owed 156 visits.

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It's probably 7 or so years since I moved and never got around to registering with a GP after the move. Another one with back problems but since I'm skeptical about them being able to do anything...

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It's probably 7 or so years since I moved and never got around to registering with a GP after the move. Another one with back problems but since I'm skeptical about them being able to do anything...

Yep I'm beginning to think of cancelling. Blooloo's mentioning of the mums and sprogs club is enough to put me off going in itself.

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If it was a flat rate 30 quid or so to see a doctor, no exceptions except those with genuine chronic conditions that cannot avoid regular visits to the doctor, everything else free, this would stop being an issue very very quickly indeed.

Everyone would have to keep thirty quid for when they really needed it.

Before anyone says what about the poor poor people without thirty quid because they're too stupid to put it by or those who don't go when they should, I don't care, democracy is supposed to be the greater good for the greatest number, not the greater good for the greatest f*ckwits.

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Trouble is, the macho stiff upper lip grin-and-bear-it attitude doesn't help much if you end up with something that becomes incapacitating and difficult to treat when it could have been cleared up quite easily if discovered earlier.

My old dad's a case in point. Walking was becoming more and more difficult for him, but he refused to go to the doctor, saying it was just old age and there was no point. His quality of life was badly affected, he couldn't work properly, and he was becoming a burden for the rest of the family. In the end, he finally relented and saw the doctor, who diagnosed narrowed arteries. The arteries in his legs were widened using a straightforward procedure, and he was given a new lease of life, literally running around the garden to celebrate his new-found fitness! His only regret is for all the time wasted before he went to the docs.

I'm not saying you should go to the docs for the slightest twinge, but there's really no point in suffering needlessly!

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Its mums and their sprogs....these children are dying one minute..100 temp, throwing up, then next minute running around like nothing happened.

Ive been 3 times since my accident.

Hope your 'accident' doesn't read the forums...

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Guest eight

Hope your 'accident' doesn't read the forums...

:lol:

That's not what he meant but I suspect you know that.

I'm another infrequent visitor but will have to go again soon. Last time I went was to get some eczema cream, about this time last year. You're supposed to use it daily but I only use it when it's really bad (usually because I've been lazy with my diet and hygiene). Consequently it's lasted me a year. Now I could get this cream over the counter elsewhere in the World for pennies but because it's a prescribed drug here I will need to visit the GP to get a prescription and then pay through the nose for it.

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:lol:

That's not what he meant but I suspect you know that.

I'm another infrequent visitor but will have to go again soon. Last time I went was to get some eczema cream, about this time last year. You're supposed to use it daily but I only use it when it's really bad (usually because I've been lazy with my diet and hygiene). Consequently it's lasted me a year. Now I could get this cream over the counter elsewhere in the World for pennies but because it's a prescribed drug here I will need to visit the GP to get a prescription and then pay through the nose for it.

;)

On the tube in London I keep seeing posters telling me to text a number to donate 3 quid to save 2 kids sight in africa with antibiotics. Now, even if they got _all_ that money, it seems a bit cheaper than the antibiotics here to do the same job...

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People do like their hand held and to be told its all better when its not. I haven't been for 8 years, completely useless 99% of the time because all they do is manage symptoms.

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:lol:

That's not what he meant but I suspect you know that.

I'm another infrequent visitor but will have to go again soon. Last time I went was to get some eczema cream, about this time last year. You're supposed to use it daily but I only use it when it's really bad (usually because I've been lazy with my diet and hygiene). Consequently it's lasted me a year. Now I could get this cream over the counter elsewhere in the World for pennies but because it's a prescribed drug here I will need to visit the GP to get a prescription and then pay through the nose for it.

Can't you buy it online?

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Guest eight

Can't you buy it online?

Can't remember exactly why now, but no. It's only a generic hydrocortisone cream though so I might have to get creative.

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Can't remember exactly why now, but no. It's only a generic hydrocortisone cream though so I might have to get creative.

You shouldn't need to see the doctor. Just send an email or phone them up asking for a repeat prescription. This is what I do when I run out of hydrocortisone cream and not seen the doctor for years. Alternatively, you can get 1% hydrocortisone cream over the counter.

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If it was a flat rate 30 quid or so to see a doctor, no exceptions except those with genuine chronic conditions that cannot avoid regular visits to the doctor, everything else free, this would stop being an issue very very quickly indeed.

Sort of agreed. In order not to discourage those who are genuinely in two minds as to whether they could be experiencing the early warning signs of something serious, I'd allow one or two 'free' visits a year, but certainly nothing like six. Unless you have a specific, chronic illness, are in some sort of a high risk occupation or are incapable of taking care of yourself, you should not need to see a doctor six times a year.

Trouble is, the macho stiff upper lip grin-and-bear-it attitude doesn't help much if you end up with something that becomes incapacitating and difficult to treat when it could have been cleared up quite easily if discovered earlier.

My old dad's a case in point...

I have a similar example, but not with a happy ending. Colleague in his mid-50s, who would repeatedly crow about how he never had a sick day off work in his adult life and expressing very little sympathy for those who had. One day, he started to complain of feeling tired and short of breath. A month later the symptoms hadn't got any better, and he was now complaining about difficulty in swallowing. Went to GP under intense pressure from family, friends and colleagues. GP sent him to Casualty. It was advanced lung cancer - he was dead six weeks later.

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Seems to be a lot of bad back people on here. My brother had been backwards (no pun.....) and forwards for tests about his back

and it has made no difference.

He got the impression they thought he was trying to go on the disability and gave him endless questionnaires about how it effects work

and sex life etc.

I think he has given up now. I think I might have just said "I have no intention of claiming disability benefits now will you fecking help me

with my back!".

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Weird.

Apart from the time's I've been I'm hardly ever there.

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Just googled this information, and I really am not surprised.

Googled? Where does it come from?

I expect the median number of visits per person is less than one a year, as with all those HPC folks who haven't been in many years. It's not really relevant to healthy folks of working age. Or indeed school age, once you reach the point of taking control.

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I have a similar example, but not with a happy ending. Colleague in his mid-50s, who would repeatedly crow about how he never had a sick day off work in his adult life and expressing very little sympathy for those who had. One day, he started to complain of feeling tired and short of breath. A month later the symptoms hadn't got any better, and he was now complaining about difficulty in swallowing. Went to GP under intense pressure from family, friends and colleagues. GP sent him to Casualty. It was advanced lung cancer - he was dead six weeks later.

Perhaps the health service should be asking why men stay clear of GP surgeries, as is clear by this thread. I don't think it is just a macho thing or because they can't face their health fears. Basically to walk into something akin to a Darby and Joan/weighwatchers women only group/creche is a bit of a fish out of water for most. Just as most women would feel uncomfortable walking into a Wetherspoons alone with the test match on. By contrast I reckon women feel very at home.

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I wasn't even registered for nearly 20 years. Have been a few times in the last year. Part of the problem is that GPs can do very little without referring you to some specialist.

Also there is very little coordination. The missus has a chronic condition, plus various side effects relating to chemotherapy a decade ago. Each condition/set of symptoms is managed separately. I swear that as a result there was a point where she had a hospital or GP appointment at least once a week for a couple of years - and most of this was monitoring/advice/on-going management.

I think a lot of men don't go - because of missing time off work. Visiting the quack is very much geared to those who don't have a day job to commute to.

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:lol:

That's not what he meant but I suspect you know that.

I'm another infrequent visitor but will have to go again soon. Last time I went was to get some eczema cream, about this time last year. You're supposed to use it daily but I only use it when it's really bad (usually because I've been lazy with my diet and hygiene). Consequently it's lasted me a year. Now I could get this cream over the counter elsewhere in the World for pennies but because it's a prescribed drug here I will need to visit the GP to get a prescription and then pay through the nose for it.

What is it? Sorry if I'm teaching granny to suck eggs here, but Hydrocortisone cream (the standard treatment for mild Eczema) is an over-the-counter medicine. My doc wrote me a prescription for it last time I went to see him (TBH I'm not quite as hardcore as many on here, probably done 8 visits in the last 10 years), but rather than pay £8.50 I found that I could just buy it for about £3. I haven't needed to use it since I figured out for myself that the Eczema was a result of being sensitive to latex :rolleyes: .

Edit: sorry, I see this has been asked and partly answered already. You have to get it from behind the pharmacy counter. HC45 is a widely available brand.

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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