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Michael Gove - Nimby's Are "enemies Of Social Mobility"

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One for Tired of Waiting :)

One problem with his argument, is that most new builds have no "soul" or character...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/hands-off-our-land/10062759/Michael-Gove-People-fighting-planning-reforms-are-against-aspiration-family-and-social-mobility.html

Michael Gove, the Education Secretary, said the countryside should not be considered sacred when it comes to building new homes and suggested that the Coalition’s reforms to the planning system would have been approved by Margaret Thatcher. He criticised people who are fighting development in rural areas, which has been made easier by the Government’s relaxation of planning rules earlier this year. He also claimed that building more homes in the countryside could add to its beauty.

“These planning reforms have not been without their critics but no one who believes in social mobility, in aspiration, in pro-family policies, in thrift and in freedom can be anything other than delighted by the release of more land for housing,” he said.

Mr Gove continued: “We cannot think of our built environment without thinking of beauty. Many of the most beautiful vistas in the United Kingdom are beautiful because of building. Whether it’s Chatsworth or the Nash terraces of Regent’s Park, Edinburgh’s New Town or Salisbury Cathedral, the man-made environment is as capable of inspiring awe as anything in nature.

“So when we think of new building we should not think only of losing some undeveloped land – we should also think of the potential to create something of grace and beauty, to ravish the eye and lift up the soul.”

Ministers introduced reforms that cut 1,400 pages of planning guidance to 52, written with a bias for “sustainable development”. The changes were strongly opposed by campaigners and readers of The Daily Telegraph through its “Hands Off Our Land” campaign.

In his speech today to mark the legacy of Sir Keith Joseph, a former Cabinet minister who served three prime ministers including Lady Thatcher, Mr Gove said the fact that “too few modern buildings can aspire to real beauty is a challenge to the architectural profession”. The lack of house building over “generations” had been partly responsible for the chaotic housing market and had “contributed to the growth and bursting of property bubbles”, he said. Owning a home had “become the preserve of those with family wealth” and the many “cramped” ones built in the past two decades had made it “more difficult to raise and support a family”.

Mr Gove saluted “the political courage and policy clarity of Eric Pickles, Greg Clark and Nick Boles” who were ensuring that “things are changing”.

The speech, to the Centre for Policy Studies in the City of London, will be welcomed by the Chancellor, George Osborne, who has backed the planning reforms. It was unclear why Mr Gove chose to enter the highly-charged debate over planning reforms. He also set out a strong defence of the City from excessive regulation by Brussels.

He said the Industrial Revolution had depended on “financial innovation” and that “clumsy and ill-thought-out interventions” from either the EU or the Labour Party “would impair the power of the City to innovate, attract talent and generate wealth and opportunity for our nation”.

Mr Gove highlighted government action to tackle the “cycle of deprivation” across a range of policy areas, including crime, welfare and education, insisting that it went to the heart of the Prime Minister’s leadership.

Nick Clegg, the Deputy Prime Minister, had earlier hinted at Mr Gove’s reported intentions to lead the Tories during his weekly phone-in programme on LBC, a commercial radio station. He said: “Michael, who I think is a perfectly nice chap, doesn’t know the first thing about the [Lib Dems] ... of course, he knows a thing or two about leadership ambitions, but that’s a different matter.”

Shaun Spiers, the chief executive of the Campaign to Protect Rural England, said there was “nothing shameful” about fighting development and trying to preserve the countryside and that people who did so were “community heroes”.

He said Margaret Thatcher had told the campaign in 1986 that it was “vital to protect an inheritance of such unparalleled beauty and variety as our British countryside”.

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Thats because they are new ?

I'm sure you can build new housing with a bit more character than the type of identikit Barratt housing that we have at the moment...

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I'm sure you can build new housing with a bit more character than the type of identikit Barratt housing that we have at the moment...

If you put it that way - fair enough.

We do have a horrible, horrible way of procuring new houses - the vast majority of new homes are built by a handful of companies, operating under the risk and efficiency pressures of large volumes: who also have little vested interest beyond the initial sale...

...while the population sits meekly and impotently back watching Grand Designs and Homes Under the Hammer.

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If you put it that way - fair enough.

We do have a horrible, horrible way of procuring new houses - the vast majority of new homes are built by a handful of companies, operating under the risk and efficiency pressures of large volumes: who also have little vested interest beyond the initial sale...

...while the population sits meekly and impotently back watching Grand Designs and Homes Under the Hammer.

...and the trouble with these identikit housing is that they really aren't fit for purpose - we produce some of the smallest houses in Europe, yet people still lap them up...

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Generally 'leafyness' makes most places look 'nice'

Given practically all new builds have no front garden space, this is impossible. Its just canyons of concrete.

Er...no. Its canyons of mind-numbing brick smeared with traditional pastiche because we fear the new and rather curl up in Victoriana's lap.

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...and the trouble with these identikit housing is that they really aren't fit for purpose - we produce some of the smallest houses in Europe, yet people still lap them up...

What choice do we have ?

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What choice do we have ?

I personally like the timber type homes that you might find in Scandinavia or Germany...I doubt these would ever be built on a mass scale though...

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Generally 'leafyness' makes most places look 'nice'

Given practically all new builds have no front garden space, this is impossible. Its just canyons of concrete.

..it takes about ten years for a new build area to start settling down with shrubs, trees and hedges....it's the people who give a place character ...not the bricks and mortar...if the people lack character, this will be mirrored in the development or area ..or part of the area.... :rolleyes:

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..it takes about ten years for a new build area to start settling down with shrubs, trees and hedges....it's the people who give a place character ...not the bricks and mortar...if the people lack character, this will be mirrored in the development or area ..or part of the area.... :rolleyes:

How many people know their next door neighbours (be it in a new development or not)...not as many as it once was...

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I guess you could have this...:

http://www.galliford...mmunity-village

But the Big House Builder's marketing department know you really want this:

http://www.crewechro...00252-24043097/

Just what is it with builders putting in a window sill, but then brick it up? See it all the time with new houses...

I find the huff haus idea really interesting...

http://www.huf-haus.com/en/home.html

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This is a significant play by Gove, because there is a strong chance he will be next leader of the Conservatives, and he is setting out his agenda. They need to chuck Dave and George to have any realistic hope of winning in 2015 and senior figures realise this.

He does not have the power base from Education to shape any change in this area, but his support for Boles comes at a vital time when he is under heavy fire from those resisting development all along the line (including inside his own party), and other senior colleagues have remained silent. We are seeing the next generation of Tory leaders take shape and I am sure this will not be forgotten.

The namecheck of Pickles is rather bizarre, given that he has promised to defend the greenbelt to the last. Perhaps Gove did not want to risk embarrassing him by praising his subordinate while failing to mention his boss.

The crack in the dam just widened an extra few millimetres.

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He does not have the power base from Education to shape any change in this area

It does impact his area though because free schools are the target of Nimby protests.

I've posted this in the other thread but it's an example of the kind of thing he would have seen as Education Secretary - http://propertyspotter.blogspot.com/2013/05/nimby-nation.html

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Just what is it with builders putting in a window sill, but then brick it up? See it all the time with new houses...

I find the huff haus idea really interesting...

http://www.huf-haus.com/en/home.html

Smacks of design on the cheap with an internal design team...

Confident people being genuinely creative about housing and construction do tend to be from Germany...

Problem with this one for the planners is light spill on the left elevation so it needs to be bricked up.

The local vernacular has a proper pitched roof so none of that split pitched roof nonsense let alone all those windows and lack of brick.

The neighbours like the neighbourhood the way it is, not being parochial mind, it is perfectly acceptable somewhere else. And if they allow this building, other people might want to do the same.

There is a spotted unicorn-newts nest on the right elevation so this won't be built for another decade while they all figure out what to do.

Best sell the plot to Barratfs...

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Just what is it with builders putting in a window sill, but then brick it up? See it all the time with new houses...

It's because there is a wall behind it. Without the window though, the house would look odd.

A better solution would be to just make the windows above the doors much bigger, but then they would need a more expensive window and lintel.

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Er...no. Its canyons of mind-numbing brick smeared with traditional pastiche because we fear the new and rather curl up in Victoriana's lap.

So traditional pastiche is bad but "modern" pastiche (i.e. a lame copy of soon-to-be 100 year old bauhaus/corbusier/stalinist work camp) is alright?

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One for Tired of Waiting :)

One problem with his argument, is that most new builds have no "soul" or character...

Neither do most people who live in them.

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"One problem with his argument, is that most new builds have no "soul" or character..."

Neither do most people who live in them.

The question is: which is the chicken and which is the egg?

As with the question of why otherwise sensible people take on stupid debt levels to have the simple luxury of being able to choose the colour of the wallpaper in the box the spend the majority of their existence, unfortunately there is only one world and it's rather hard not to live in it!

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Mr Gove continued: "We cannot think of our built environment without thinking of beauty. Many of the most beautiful vistas in the United Kingdom are beautiful because of building. Whether it's Chatsworth or the Nash terraces of Regent's Park, Edinburgh's New Town or Salisbury Cathedral, the man-made environment is as capable of inspiring awe as anything in nature

I'll have a Chatsworth for £200k then please Mr Gove. In fact, I'll take two.

Ta.

chatsworth2.jpg

Edited by R K

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  • 241 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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