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Cameron Smack Down In Brussels

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David Cameron's attempts to rein in EU spending suffered a major defeat after Europe's finance ministers outnumbered Britain to impose an extra £770 million in "unjustified" contributions the Treasury must pay to Brussels this year.

The setback for the Prime Minister will add to Conservative turmoil over the question of EU membership as well as putting pressure on Labour and the Liberal Democrats to back a referendum on Europe.

Cash-strapped European governments must now find an additional £6.2 billion for the Brussels budget, a 5.5 per cent increase, at a time of deep cuts to national public spending and EU-imposed austerity in the eurozone.

The raid to pay unpaid bills and to meet a budget shortfall will take Britain's contributions to £14.7 billion this year, meaning that the cost to average British household of belonging to the EU will be £581.

"When countries and citizens across Europe are having to make difficult decisions with their budgets, Europe itself should practice what it preaches with its own budget," said a Treasury spokesman.

"This amendment was unjustified, which is why Britain opposed it."

How much of that goes directly into Hannan and Farage's pockets?

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:lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol::lol:

And Cameron thinks he's going to negotiate a 'new relationship' with the EU (Havent the tories been saying that since 1993, when they realized what a **** up they made on Maastricht?)

Cameron cant even negotiate a minor concession on the budget...of course there will be no 'new relationship', just more globalist insanity.

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I went into Sainsburys the other day...I didnt want to pay £7/kilo for my beef, but the management outvoted me.

Disaster?...setback?

no...I went to my local butcher and and paid £6.90/kilo.

Cameron....just say no....what are they going to do about it? the begger always has the weak hand.....we have the cash, WE decide how to pay it out.

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A lot of the eu's negotiating position has been to do with the eu will eventually be big and strong.

As it's turned out it just seems to be getting weaker economically (and politically) along with most of its constituent members so there's a case for no more contributions until it's sorted out (that's quite apart from the case for leaving).

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Guest eight

Given the way things are going, isn't the EU being a bit foolish here? Either that or they actually want us to leave the EU...

Seems like it with everything possible being done in this country to assist the rise of UKIP, even by supposedly competing parties. Looks to me that it has been decided from somewhere that, whereas the meme of the last fifty years was harmony and consolidation, the meme for the next fifty is fragmentation and confrontation.

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Given the way things are going, isn't the EU being a bit foolish here? Either that or they actually want us to leave the EU...

If you mean "Why is the EU forcing politically-sensitive increases at a time of fauxsterity without considering the political ramifications of doing so", I think the answer is plain: they don't care, and they've scarcely had to worry much about the odd budget wrangle in the past- people pay up without issue and it is forgotten about after a few weeks, even if there is political grandstanding.

However, like Cameron, the mood in the UK for continuing to take this sort of stuff is changing rapidly now people feel they have a viable outlet for their frustrations.

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Given the way things are going, isn't the EU being a bit foolish here? Either that or they actually want us to leave the EU...

If you're a member of a club, then you have to pay the mutually agreed (by the EU Parliament - a democratically elected body) fees. That's all there is to it. Obviously the other EU member states would rather the UK remained a member of the club, but they can hardly be expected to make special allowance for one prima donna, no matter how must fuss and bluster is forthcoming.

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If you're a member of a club, then you have to pay the mutually agreed (by the EU Parliament - a democratically elected body) fees. That's all there is to it. Obviously the other EU member states would rather the UK remained a member of the club, but they can hardly be expected to make special allowance for one prima donna, no matter how must fuss and bluster is forthcoming.

To extend the simile, if you don't like the fee increases in your club because you have strong suspicions the directors and trustees are lining their own pockets, whilst the drinks bill is being used by freeloading criminals, you leave.

Oh, wait a minute, you can't do that with the EU.

A better simile may therefore be a criminal protection racket - once you are in, you are never allowed to leave and they ramp up the extortion with threats and violence

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To extend the simile, if you don't like the fee increases in your club because you have strong suspicions the directors and trustees are lining their own pockets, whilst the drinks bill is being used by freeloading criminals, you leave.

Oh, wait a minute, you can't do that with the EU.

A better simile may therefore be a criminal protection racket - once you are in, you are never allowed to leave and they ramp up the extortion with threats and violence

Nobody's threatening the UK with violence. If the UK chooses to leave the EU, it's free to do so. It would, in my opinion, be a daft thing to do and isn't going to win us any friends, but nobody's going to stop us.

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Nobody's threatening the UK with violence. If the UK chooses to leave the EU, it's free to do so. It would, in my opinion, be a daft thing to do and isn't going to win us any friends, but nobody's going to stop us.

The political class at pretty much every level within the UK and beyond is attempting to stop the question of whether to remain in the EU ever being asked in the first place though. Cameron has backtracked once and is well on his way to attempting the same stunt again by concocting a plan to hold a non-binding referendum after the next General Election, as if he'll be anywhere near No10, and Clegg has previously pulled an in-considered stunt calling for an in/out referendum which haunts him regularly now.

It may be the case that no-one will stop the UK leaving if a mandate to do so is obtained, but it seems obtaining the mandate is proving hard enough.

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  • 261 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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