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Valuing Housing At A County Level

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For anyone interested in looking at Property Values at a more granular level this post presents a detailed table showing the earnings, house prices and values of property at a County level. It uses the Land Registry and ASHE datasets as its basis.

The regional variations are quite stark with their being nearly a fourfold difference between "undervalued" and "overvalued" County's.

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For anyone interested in looking at Property Values at a more granular level this post presents a detailed table showing the earnings, house prices and values of property at a County level. It uses the Land Registry and ASHE datasets as its basis.

The regional variations are quite stark with their being nearly a fourfold difference between "undervalued" and "overvalued" County's.

Very important data. Thanks for posting it.

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Good data, there will be some huge variations within some counties too. A house in Cambridge, compared to one in the northern bit of the fens for example, or the coastal bits of Kent around Dover (low house prices) compared to places like sevenoaks (high)

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Very important data. Thanks for posting it.

No problem. It took me quite a while to pull together so would be wasted if just kept to myself.

Good data, there will be some huge variations within some counties too. A house in Cambridge, compared to one in the northern bit of the fens for example, or the coastal bits of Kent around Dover (low house prices) compared to places like sevenoaks (high)

Agreed. I think I have the data to go one level deeper but given what you see presented took me half a day to pull together I can only imagine how long it would take at the next level for all the County's. I'll probably do it soon for just the areas I'm monitoring idc.

Interesting.....the variation of wages across the counties is as striking as the house price differentials. ;)

I noticed that as well. For average earnings there is a 2.3 times difference between the lowest and highest County.

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No problem. It took me quite a while to pull together so would be wasted if just kept to myself.

Agreed. I think I have the data to go one level deeper but given what you see presented took me half a day to pull together I can only imagine how long it would take at the next level for all the County's. I'll probably do it soon for just the areas I'm monitoring idc.

I noticed that as well. For average earnings there is a 2.3 times difference between the lowest and highest County.

You did this? Well done!

be interested to know what level down you are thinking of doing. Also if you are lacking the resource to do it, maybe break out your sources/data to the hpc massive.

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You did this? Well done!

be interested to know what level down you are thinking of doing. Also if you are lacking the resource to do it, maybe break out your sources/data to the hpc massive.

Thanks. I'm not out looking at over priced property so have some time to soak up some sun while running a bit of analysis. Looking at London as an example I could calculate Earnings, House Prices and Value down to this level:

- Barking and Dagenham

- Barnet

- Bexley

- Brent

- Bromley

- Camden

- City of London

- City of Westminster

- Croydon

- Ealing

- Enfield

- Greenwich

- Hackney

- Hammersmith and Fulham

- Haringey

- Harrow

- Havering

- Hillingdon

- Hounslow

- Islington

- Kensington and Chelsea

- Kingston upon Thames

- Lambeth

- Lewisham

- Merton

- Newham

- Redbridge

- Richmond upon Thames

- Southwark

- Sutton

- Tower Hamlets

- Waltham Forest

- Wandsworth

All the data is freely available from Land Registry and ONS. It's just time.

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Like companies, P/Es which are low, tend to stay low, and go lower for much longer than one could think and it would be the same with high P/Es.

The best house on the best street in the best city in the best county will tend to be a high P/E, and be high and go higher in most parts of the economic cycle. If someone loses their job and gets repossessed the location of the house will attract a similar person of similar earnings, and credit rating into that house. It harks back to location location location; think schools, crime, jobs, etc. It would appear, in London, there is no end to the people who can sustain these high P/Es. But in Ireland, the number of people dried up quickly in their housing bubble.

Structural changes take a long time to impact P/Es, I would think about centres of industrial power in the North of England of the past.

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The data set alone makes this thread worth pinning- Mods?

I try and write a couple of posts of this quality per week. Typically I'm covering:

- UK housing including Real Pricing, Value and Affordability

- UK and US stock market valuations

- Gold valuations

- UK Earnings

- UK Mortgage and Savings Rates

- plus how I'm on an accelerated journey to financial independence and the odd rant for good measure

If you're interested in the top right corner of my site you can subscribe to receive my posts via RSS, Email or Twitter. All gratis of course.

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Thanks

fascinating.

Interesting to see my county, Herefordshire, the reddest in its region with both the lowest incomes and the highest house prices. There are currently campaigns against new housing developments in most of the towns.

I wonder if there is anywhere with a lower average income that still elects an old Etonian Tory MP.

I suspect one of the smaller scale effects is the number of pensioners who wont be on the ASHE data, and farmers who are good at having a low taxable income.

It would be great if the local rag picked this up, but unfortunately they would trumpet the high house prices as a positive thing.

Thanks again

Y

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Agreed. I think I have the data to go one level deeper but given what you see presented took me half a day to pull together I can only imagine how long it would take at the next level for all the County's. I'll probably do it soon for just the areas I'm monitoring idc.

There is a table with this info, see "Table 577", here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/live-tables-on-housing-market-and-house-prices

Direct link to table (MSExcel) : https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/85872/table577.xls

I made a chart from it last year (per region, local median house prices / local median earnings), but I couldn't update it this year because for some strange reason they've stopped publishing the regional average. I've explained it here: http://www.housepricecrash.co.uk/forum/index.php?showtopic=117772&view=findpost&p=909267539

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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For anyone interested in looking at Property Values at a more granular level this post presents a detailed table showing the earnings, house prices and values of property at a County level. It uses the Land Registry and ASHE datasets as its basis.

The regional variations are quite stark with their being nearly a fourfold difference between "undervalued" and "overvalued" County's.

Data P0rn - I like it.

Seriously - thanks for posting.

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Thanks

fascinating.

Interesting to see my county, Herefordshire, the reddest in its region with both the lowest incomes and the highest house prices. There are currently campaigns against new housing developments in most of the towns.

I wonder if there is anywhere with a lower average income that still elects an old Etonian Tory MP.

I suspect one of the smaller scale effects is the number of pensioners who wont be on the ASHE data, and farmers who are good at having a low taxable income.

It would be great if the local rag picked this up, but unfortunately they would trumpet the high house prices as a positive thing.

Thanks again

Y

....with a place like Hertfordshire being within the commuter belt, I would imagine most who own there travel into town to work for the higher wages hence why prices are higher.

Looking at the south west for example, places like Devon and Dorset where does the money come from to keep the prices so high when the local wages are so low?

Answers on a postcard. ;)

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Thanks

fascinating.

Interesting to see my county, Herefordshire, the reddest in its region with both the lowest incomes and the highest house prices. There are currently campaigns against new housing developments in most of the towns.

I wonder if there is anywhere with a lower average income that still elects an old Etonian Tory MP.

I suspect one of the smaller scale effects is the number of pensioners who wont be on the ASHE data, and farmers who are good at having a low taxable income.

It would be great if the local rag picked this up, but unfortunately they would trumpet the high house prices as a positive thing.

Thanks again

Y

People selling in London and other expensive places then going to Herefordshire to retire? + second homes.

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Thanks

fascinating.

Interesting to see my county, Herefordshire, the reddest in its region with both the lowest incomes and the highest house prices. There are currently campaigns against new housing developments in most of the towns.

I wonder if there is anywhere with a lower average income that still elects an old Etonian Tory MP.

I suspect one of the smaller scale effects is the number of pensioners who wont be on the ASHE data, and farmers who are good at having a low taxable income.

It would be great if the local rag picked this up, but unfortunately they would trumpet the high house prices as a positive thing.

Thanks again

Y

+ 1

Good post.

Retired NIMBYs in power ... same story, all over the South: fvcking the working / younger locals. Despicable. Alas, typical too.

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....with a place like Hertfordshire being within the commuter belt, I would imagine most who own there travel into town to work for the higher wages hence why prices are higher.

Looking at the south west for example, places like Devon and Dorset where does the money come from to keep the prices so high when the local wages are so low?

Answers on a postcard. ;)

Well off retirees, usually after a career in London. And they are also very active politically, extremist NIMBYs. Many become local and County Councillors themselves.

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Well off retirees, usually after a career in London. And they are also very active politically, extremist NIMBYs. Many become local and County Councillors themselves.

Where would you like to live given the choice? ;)

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Where would you like to live given the choice? ;)

London. But that is besides the point.

But back to the issue, if these retirees want to live in or near small villages and towns in the South, fine, by all means! But why do they have to be so fvcking selfish, insensitive, cruel, always opposing any sort of development anyfvckingwhere?

They've even opposed (successfully) new Eco Towns, planned for brownfields, in the middle of nofvckingwhere, and far from their own homes. Selfish, insensitive, cruel.

(Google Ford Eco Town for instance.) ;)

.

Edited by Tired of Waiting

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London. But that is besides the point.

But back to the issue, if these retirees want to live in or near small villages and towns in the South, fine, by all means! But why do they have to be so fvcking selfish, insensitive, cruel, always opposing any sort of development anyfvckingwhere?

They've even opposed (successfully) new Eco Towns, planned for brownfields, in the middle of nofvckingwhere, and far from their own homes?

(Google Ford Eco Town for instance.) ;)

.

I can't speak for people that oppose certain projects, all I do know is that local people being able to speak out and able to raise objections, able to make a protests if they want to is a good thing that this country should be proud about......when living in London a four story block of flats was built at the end of a row of houses with short back gardens despite the residents objections, blocking both light and sky the owner did not live there, they didn't have to look at it every day, they were a property developer only in it for the money, they lived in a posh detached in Surrey somewhere......can you imagine their reaction if a block of flats was put at the end of their garden. ;)

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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