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Gigantic Purple Slug

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This is a new concept (to me anyway).

When you buy your ticket you sometimes get to bid on upgrades. I presume the highest bids secure the seats.

Anyway just managed to secure a bargin upgrade on a very long flight. Very happy bunny.

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This is a new concept (to me anyway).

When you buy your ticket you sometimes get to bid on upgrades. I presume the highest bids secure the seats.

Anyway just managed to secure a bargin upgrade on a very long flight. Very happy bunny.

Well done... I tried last month for a trip to Vegas. ... No luck for me. :)

Yep, the highest bid secures the seats but if they have a few spare then you obviously stand more of a chance. Even the minimum bid for me was an extra £265 on top of my standard ticket.

I will try again next time though.

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Do these auctioned upgrades take precedence over passengers who would normally get one by virtue of their frequent flyer status? If so, that's going to p!ss off a lot of gold and platinum level flyers who routinely buy full price, flexible economy tickets on the same airline. As things stand they expect these upgrades in exchange for their loyalty, and if they're going to be bumped from them by sealed bid cash buyers, the airlines are going to lose a lot of high value customers.

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Time for upgrades has gone I think. When I started out I would get upgraded all the time, but then even as the flight frequency increased (I was doing 2 a week on average) the ugrades got fewer. The golden age was pre 2005 where an upgrade to first class was not uncommon from economy and I swanned across the Atlantic sampling the finest wines. My guess is that in the brave new world you need to be doing some serious mileage and occassionally in the higher cabins in order to be a regular beneficiary of upgrades.

Do these auctioned upgrades take precedence over passengers who would normally get one by virtue of their frequent flyer status? If so, that's going to p!ss off a lot of gold and platinum level flyers who routinely buy full price, flexible economy tickets on the same airline. As things stand they expect these upgrades in exchange for their loyalty, and if they're going to be bumped from them by sealed bid cash buyers, the airlines are going to lose a lot of high value customers.

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Time for upgrades has gone I think. When I started out I would get upgraded all the time, but then even as the flight frequency increased (I was doing 2 a week on average) the ugrades got fewer. The golden age was pre 2005 where an upgrade to first class was not uncommon from economy and I swanned across the Atlantic sampling the finest wines. My guess is that in the brave new world you need to be doing some serious mileage and occassionally in the higher cabins in order to be a regular beneficiary of upgrades.

IMO this is a poor idea as i believe it devalues premium cabins and will put off many people from buying premium cabins outright.

It would be interesting to see how much money they would make off 'chancers' bidding for upgrades versus those who buy premium cabins. I'd hazard a guess that they won't actually make that much more £ from doing this and are quite likely to p off quite a few of their high level frequent flyers, who will get pretty p'd off with Mr & Mrs Economy who bid £201 each for business class seats.

If I was a Virgin Gold / Platinum (or whatever there system is) i'd be pretty annoyed by this. I'm a BA Gold card holder and if they start doing this I'll be off somewhere else.

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I do around 5-7 return transatlantic journeys on KLM/Delta (Teesside to Fairbanks, usually via Amsterdam and Minneapolis or Seattle), most of them on not the bargain basement cheapest economy tickets, but not the most expensive ones either. I usually get the tickets that will allow you to change a flight, but at a hefty fee, because occasionally my plans have to change after booking. I make gold level on KLM's scheme in most years, and in the decade or so I've been doing these trips, made platinum once. I quite frequently get upgraded on the US internal legs, but have only once been on a transatlantic one, and that was during the platinum year. To stand a good chance of getting these upgrades, you need to be both a platinum level and to have a fully flex ticket, which costs about the same as a restricted, advance purchase business class ticket (£2.5-3k) anyway.

and are quite likely to p off quite a few of their high level frequent flyers, who will get pretty p'd off with Mr & Mrs Economy who bid £201 each for business class seats.

Especially as Mr. and Mrs. Economy are likely to be there because they want to get blind drunk, play around with the gadgets and make noisy idiots of themselves, whereas most actual business class travellers are there because they want to work and/or sleep in peace.

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Do these auctioned upgrades take precedence over passengers who would normally get one by virtue of their frequent flyer status? If so, that's going to p!ss off a lot of gold and platinum level flyers who routinely buy full price, flexible economy tickets on the same airline. As things stand they expect these upgrades in exchange for their loyalty, and if they're going to be bumped from them by sealed bid cash buyers, the airlines are going to lose a lot of high value customers.

Maybe this is a sign of how dire the economy is - business class passengers down considerably I would assume if they have introduced this scheme.

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I do around 5-7 return transatlantic journeys on KLM/Delta (Teesside to Fairbanks, usually via Amsterdam and Minneapolis or Seattle), most of them on not the bargain basement cheapest economy tickets, but not the most expensive ones either. I usually get the tickets that will allow you to change a flight, but at a hefty fee, because occasionally my plans have to change after booking. I make gold level on KLM's scheme in most years, and in the decade or so I've been doing these trips, made platinum once. I quite frequently get upgraded on the US internal legs, but have only once been on a transatlantic one, and that was during the platinum year. To stand a good chance of getting these upgrades, you need to be both a platinum level and to have a fully flex ticket, which costs about the same as a restricted, advance purchase business class ticket (£2.5-3k) anyway.

Especially as Mr. and Mrs. Economy are likely to be there because they want to get blind drunk, play around with the gadgets and make noisy idiots of themselves, whereas most actual business class travellers are there because they want to work and/or sleep in peace.

:lol: and you know it would be Mr and Mrs Daily Express who's be falling over themselves to boast about how their BTLs have paid for their fourth holiday of the year, having retired at 55.

I'm literally about to board a plane from Sydney to London and I can guarantee that I'll put in an 8 hour stint of work. I'd be right annoyed by some chancer chortling away whilst knocking back the free booze. (god don't I sound like a right @sshole :P )

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You place your bid and you only find out if you have been upgraded up until 98 hours before scheduled departure time)

I just checked and I bid an extra £285 on top of my original ticket for an upgrade from economy to Premium economy... This was the lowest possible bid that put me in the `Fair` chance category... It goes from fair to excellent... This is for a single journey, Obviously you can bid lots more and get into the excellent category but you are probably nearer the original price to fly Premium economy return in the first place.

Dear Bosh

This email is to confirm that we have received your offer(s) to be upgraded on your upcoming Virgin Atlantic flight(s). If your upgrade offer is accepted you'll be informed via email before departure.

What happens if I'm upgraded?

* We will notify you via email and your credit card will be billed the amount that you offered below.

* When you checkin for your flight as you normally would, you'll receive your new upgraded boarding pass!

If you are not upgraded, you will keep the original ticket that you already have. You will not be charged for any additional amounts.

Summary of your offer(s):

Virgin Atlantic Confirmation Number: '''''''''''''Date Flight Origin Destination Bid

08 Apr 2013 VS 44 Las Vegas (LAS) London (LGW) £285 GBP per passenger (2) modify / cancel (up until 98 hours before scheduled departure time)

Good luck and we're looking forward to welcoming you onboard. Please remember that each flight leg is considered its own offer and is considered independently of one another. You may only be upgraded for some of the legs.

Virgin Atlantic

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I just checked and I bid an extra £285 on top of my original ticket for an upgrade from economy to Premium economy...

:o

Depending on your frequent flyer status and the length of the flight, it costs between £35 and £90 simply to buy an economy to premium economy upgrade outright on Delta, without faffing around with blind auctions!

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:o

Depending on your frequent flyer status and the length of the flight, it costs between £35 and £90 simply to buy an economy to premium economy upgrade outright on Delta, without faffing around with blind auctions!

It used to be the same on Virgin so I am shocked to see this £285 one way just to have a chance of a premium seat - which just means more leg room.

I have not been on Virgin for years but it sounds as if they have gone to the dogs. Don't Virgin fly a lot of Delta passengers anyhow?

Edit:

Imagine being on a Virgin flight where one person paid £90 to upgrade to premium via Delta and someone else bid £300 or more for such a seat with Virgin.

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I'm taking a baby on a international flight in the next 6 months. Have booked business class. Looking forward to some suitbunnies going mental when the crying starts....

:lol:

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you would probably just be better off booking late and wasting the odd ticket. That said I don't know for sure as I always fly direct rather than get bumped round the houses. When I was a kid I used to do the klm flights but the extra stop plus the hundred odd mile drive to site at the end of it isn't exactly fun.

I,m kind of suprised that they will upgrade you to gold on such a small number of ta flights. These days you need to put in a serious amount of mileage to get these benefits on other airlines. Maybe they use the lower qualifying points to try to pull people in.

The ta upgrade is of course a much bigger benefit that the internal us or european upgrade which is often a matter of curtain moving and slightly better grub. Hardly worth anything to me on a 2 hour flight.

Airlines I believe continue to make little money out of economy passengers, even if they do fly frequently and the compromises I have seen made on the food over the years are beginning to become extreme.

I am sure they have looked at the drawbacks and benefits of ticket auctions and what they might result in. For example maybe they will only offer them on tourist style flights rather than on routes where there is a lot of real fee paying business. I also think that the peon many airlines is nowhere near the business class on others, so by moving into pe you are not exactly moving into the place where the business guys inhabit

I do around 5-7 return transatlantic journeys on KLM/Delta (Teesside to Fairbanks, usually via Amsterdam and Minneapolis or Seattle), most of them on not the bargain basement cheapest economy tickets, but not the most expensive ones either. I usually get the tickets that will allow you to change a flight, but at a hefty fee, because occasionally my plans have to change after booking. I make gold level on KLM's scheme in most years, and in the decade or so I've been doing these trips, made platinum once. I quite frequently get upgraded on the US internal legs, but have only once been on a transatlantic one, and that was during the platinum year. To stand a good chance of getting these upgrades, you need to be both a platinum level and to have a fully flex ticket, which costs about the same as a restricted, advance purchase business class ticket (£2.5-3k) anyway.

Especially as Mr. and Mrs. Economy are likely to be there because they want to get blind drunk, play around with the gadgets and make noisy idiots of themselves, whereas most actual business class travellers are there because they want to work and/or sleep in peace.

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I,m kind of suprised that they will upgrade you to gold on such a small number of ta flights.

KLM do it by the number of flights or the number of miles, and by flights they mean actual takeoffs and landings, not A to B trips. So one return trip usually equals six flight points for me (sometimes 7 or 8 if one of the journeys involves four flights, which it occasionally does). 15 gets you to silver level, 30 to gold and I can't remember the figure for platinum, but I think it's 50.

Silver and gold level are worth having, because they get you a better chance of an exit row seat, access to the lounge during transfers and a free checked suitcase (quite expensive otherwise).

I presume they do this to encourage people to use their hub to spoke flights, especially those who live near spoke airports where KLM offers the only long haul connections, and who might otherwise decide to travel overland to another airport in search of a cheaper fare (which is me, basically).

I spend about £8-10k a year on air tickets, which I would have thought is enough for an airline alliance to want to give me at least a bit of a carrot to encourage loyalty.

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to me the quality on va has steadily eroded over the years and this is across all the classes.

The imagine you've paid more scenario happens all the time as people rarely book tickets under similar circumstances.

It used to be the same on Virgin so I am shocked to see this £285 one way just to have a chance of a premium seat - which just means more leg room.

I have not been on Virgin for years but it sounds as if they have gone to the dogs. Don't Virgin fly a lot of Delta passengers anyhow?

Edit:

Imagine being on a Virgin flight where one person paid £90 to upgrade to premium via Delta and someone else bid £300 or more for such a seat with Virgin.

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bag, no margin for them in economy class.

They've got your number. They know by now that you will not buy higher class tickets so they don't care.

For them the money is in selling higher class tickets on a regular basis.

They would rather use upgrade potential to try to hook in new passengers rather than give it to people who will only ever buy economy. The evidence I have for this is that by experience, the first time you travel with an airline the probability of being upgraded is much higher.

8-10k might sound like a lot but it is small beer in the business world. My sister only makes a couple of flights a year on business but my guess is they make more money out of her flights than all of yours. The upside to them is if they can get her to take one more with them it would be like you taking another 5.

KLM do it by the number of flights or the number of miles, and by flights they mean actual takeoffs and landings, not A to B trips. So one return trip usually equals six flight points for me (sometimes 7 or 8 if one of the journeys involves four flights, which it occasionally does). 15 gets you to silver level, 30 to gold and I can't remember the figure for platinum, but I think it's 50.

Silver and gold level are worth having, because they get you a better chance of an exit row seat, access to the lounge during transfers and a free checked suitcase (quite expensive otherwise).

I presume they do this to encourage people to use their hub to spoke flights, especially those who live near spoke airports where KLM offers the only long haul connections, and who might otherwise decide to travel overland to another airport in search of a cheaper fare (which is me, basically).

I spend about £8-10k a year on air tickets, which I would have thought is enough for an airline alliance to want to give me at least a bit of a carrot to encourage loyalty.

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bag, no margin for them in economy class.

They've got your number. They know by now that you will not buy higher class tickets so they don't care.

For them the money is in selling higher class tickets on a regular basis.

They would rather use upgrade potential to try to hook in new passengers rather than give it to people who will only ever buy economy. The evidence I have for this is that by experience, the first time you travel with an airline the probability of being upgraded is much higher.

8-10k might sound like a lot but it is small beer in the business world. My sister only makes a couple of flights a year on business but my guess is they make more money out of her flights than all of yours. The upside to them is if they can get her to take one more with them it would be like you taking another 5.

Agree, airlines are not stupid, BA use a thing called a CIV score (I believe) and this basically determines how valuable you are to them.

You have to be spending serious £ and flying Premium / Business regularly to get upgraded. I book all my business travel myself on my own card and probably spend at least £40k per year on BA and have quite a good upgrade success rate. The trick is to fly solo, make no special meal requests, complain when device is bad and commend when service is good.

Everytime I've been upgraded from Premium to Business and Business to First has been when they've oversold the cabin, or I've selected both Economy exit rows for free and they've then sold them to someone else. The old suit and tie or "it's my honeymoon" tricks don't work

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bag, no margin for them in economy class.

So why do they bother offering an economy class service at all?

Why don't they just get rid of all their economy cabins and run planes full of business class seats, so that you're looking at a bare minimum of £3k a ticket if you want to fly at all, and if you can't afford that, then tough, go by boat?

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So why do they bother offering an economy class service at all?

Why don't they just get rid of all their economy cabins and run planes full of business class seats, so that you're looking at a bare minimum of £3k a ticket if you want to fly at all, and if you can't afford that, then tough, go by boat?

Judging by the number of airlines in financial difficulty (do any of them actually make a profit?) the answer to that question isn't entirely obvious to anyone, even those in the industry.

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So why do they bother offering an economy class service at all?

Why don't they just get rid of all their economy cabins and run planes full of business class seats, so that you're looking at a bare minimum of £3k a ticket if you want to fly at all, and if you can't afford that, then tough, go by boat?

Look up Silverjet, Maxjet, Eos...

Business class might account for "all the profit" but without the economy cabin covering all the fixed costs that profit is ephemeral....

In every business the profit is made from a smallish subset of your customers.

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I really dont get this obsession with flight 'classes' - our sales monkeys at work are always banging on about it like its really important

So you sit in a pressurised tube for a few hours , so f***ing what if you are nearer the front or you have 5.5 cm more leg room

i understand crash survival rates are better at the back anyway

get over yourselves

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I really dont get this obsession with flight 'classes' - our sales monkeys at work are always banging on about it like its really important

So you sit in a pressurised tube for a few hours , so f***ing what if you are nearer the front or you have 5.5 cm more leg room

i understand crash survival rates are better at the back anyway

get over yourselves

You don't travel for work much, do you?

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I can imagine that's the sort of level where you get some respect.

I do half that and never any evidence that they consider me any better than your bog standard tourist. It would probably help my case if I threw them a bone occasionally.

My loyalty to va is solely down to the fact that I have a pile of miles with them from the glory days. But after I have blown them on a few upper class flights which will not take too long now I'm going to go back to switching around between airlines. At least there is a chance then that I might get something, although tbh they all share so much data these days that they probably all have my profile anyway.

Someone once said to me that if you are the kind of passenger they want to upgrade, the odds are you are sitting in business class already.

Agree, airlines are not stupid, BA use a thing called a CIV score (I believe) and this basically determines how valuable you are to them.

You have to be spending serious £ and flying Premium / Business regularly to get upgraded. I book all my business travel myself on my own card and probably spend at least £40k per year on BA and have quite a good upgrade success rate. The trick is to fly solo, make no special meal requests, complain when device is bad and commend when service is good.

Everytime I've been upgraded from Premium to Business and Business to First has been when they've oversold the cabin, or I've selected both Economy exit rows for free and they've then sold them to someone else. The old suit and tie or "it's my honeymoon" tricks don't work ?

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for some people economy is really unpleasant. You don't even have to be tall, some medium sized people have a lot of their body length in their legs. Seeing them cramped up in economy is painful. I am short, which is why I don't care.

There is also the effect of arriving after a long flight refreshed and ready to go. No use flying someone to a meeting if they arrive half frazzled and are sub par, especially if it's to a customer and they are going to get some heat.

I really dont get this obsession with flight 'classes' - our sales monkeys at work are always banging on about it like its really important

So you sit in a pressurised tube for a few hours , so f***ing what if you are nearer the front or you have 5.5 cm more leg room

i understand crash survival rates are better at the back anyway

get over yourselves

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  • 246 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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