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Best Way To Cut A Bath Panel

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What's the best way to cut a plastic bath panel down to size?

So far I've had suggestions from a saw to a Stanley knife.

How about sticking some masking tape down the line you want to cut and cut through it with a jig-saw. ;)

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So far I've had suggestions from a saw to a Stanley knife.

*cold shudder runs up spine*

Please don't use a Stanley knife, you're asking for a trip to A&E in my opinion! Fine toothed saw is best, but obviously depends on size of panel/saw. Jigsaw would be ideal, but not everyone has these lying around!

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Guest eight

*cold shudder runs up spine*

Please don't use a Stanley knife, you're asking for a trip to A&E in my opinion! Fine toothed saw is best, but obviously depends on size of panel/saw. Jigsaw would be ideal, but not everyone has these lying around!

If you do insist on the Stanley knife, make light, repeated cuts along a guide. Don't cut directly towards your thigh!

I know it goes against HPC frugality but can't you get a jigsaw from Wilkos for about twenty quid? Clamp on a bit of angle for a guide, use copious amounts of masking tape to avoid scratching it, and away you go....

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*cold shudder runs up spine*

Please don't use a Stanley knife, you're asking for a trip to A&E in my opinion! Fine toothed saw is best, but obviously depends on size of panel/saw. Jigsaw would be ideal, but not everyone has these lying around!

Id go with a jigsaw.

BTW - invest in a P2 facemask as the particulate dust from fibreglass is not very nice.

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Try using a pair of shears, like those used for leather or sheet steel.

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A friend of mine in Canada is a renovator, and I recall he cuts them using a chop saw, with a plain old blade (not carbide tipped) installed backwards. Says it does a great job, if we are talking about plastic panels.

He uses the same for tin.

Trial first though!

Or you can take it to the local tin-whacker and use their shear press.

Jig saw is safest but you'll need to brace the panel or it will resonate like a royal mofo.

Stanley knife is best left for sparkies to strip wires, painters and plasterers to trim tape, and Saudi's to hijack airplanes.

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A friend of mine in Canada is a renovator, and I recall he cuts them using a chop saw, with a plain old blade (not carbide tipped) installed backwards. Says it does a great job, if we are talking about plastic panels.

Yep it's a plastic panel I'm installing.

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Yep it's a plastic panel I'm installing.

Well, if you are brave enough give it a shot. Test a section first.

I suppose the question is are you cutting an edge that will be visible on installation, or is it nipped/clicked into another section and raggedy won't much matter?

Should add, my pal is also the master of compound mitring for cabinet installations, an art of which I have sadly failed in on many attempts...and I'm an engineer!

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To cut it down to size, simply stand in front of it and tell it, in a sneering voice, that it is a very ordinary bath panel and that it has an over-inflated idea of it's own worth as bathroom decor.

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If it's the sort of material I think you won't get zero distortion or quality of finish with anything but a stanley knife. Use the snap off type blades with a good bit of blade protruding. Just wear leather gloves if you don't think you can do it without cutting yourself.

These thicker trade type quality are best for the job really.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/40-STANLEY-18mm-Snap-off-Plaster-Board-Blades-/271196771357

Slitting disc in an angle grinder will also cut cleanly but getting a straight cut is another matter. As already mentioned, unless you can sandwich between two pieces of waste wood any reciprocating saw will catch the material.

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Most Homebase's do a wood cutting service (I'm sure that would extend to a plastic panel), if you've got one nearby and a car to fit it in then job done.

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I think you need to stand back and re-evaluate your priorities and values calmly.

Every day, you will be there, in the privacy of your bathroom, naked as the day you were born. Yet you want the bath, it's legs, it's body, covered? Is this not a little prudish for the 21st century?

Set your bath free. Let it be what it is, proud in it's naked glory.

Panels are for prudes. Celebrate it's nakedness

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Got a jig saw, I just thought using that might have split it.

Do I use a standard wood blade to cut it with?

Yes ,any fine toothed general purpose blade will do . Then gently sand the cut edge with a fine sanding block to smooth it up. Its easy

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If it's the sort of material I think you won't get zero distortion or quality of finish with anything but a stanley knife. Use the snap off type blades with a good bit of blade protruding. Just wear leather gloves if you don't think you can do it without cutting yourself.

These thicker trade type quality are best for the job really.

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/40-STANLEY-18mm-Snap-off-Plaster-Board-Blades-/271196771357

Slitting disc in an angle grinder will also cut cleanly but getting a straight cut is another matter. As already mentioned, unless you can sandwich between two pieces of waste wood any reciprocating saw will catch the material.

Since posting this, the gods of irony have struck, and I've accidentally slashed a new-ish jumper with a box cutter type knife so you may want to consider the addition of either a leather apron or chainmail vest to the operation.

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I'd set to work on it with a Dremel. That's my preferred solution for most of Life's problems.

The Dremel circular saw max product is probably great for straight cuts on this sort of material and it's good on tiles too. Not nearly as useful as you might think though and I've rarely used mine. I had it as a free sample and I seem to recall I thought the market for it would be limited at the time.

The sort of tool that would be better than the commonly used ones for some applications but not enough that you'd be bothered to get it out or you've done the job before remembering you have it.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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