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SarahBell

Let Them Eat Porridge

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Guest eight

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22345958

" I also run a car, pay all of my other bills and go out at least twice a week with the money left over. The last week of the month is "porridge week". It's 99p for 500g of porridge and I eat it for breakfast, lunch and tea in the seven days before I get paid again."

But doesn't everybody do something like this, only probably to a less dramatic extent? For probably bizarre psychological reasons we always make big purchases early in the month and then tail off our spending later on. And periodically tea is what I call "chuck and cook" whereby all the odd bits of meat and vegetables in the fridge are made into pasta or risotto or something in anticipation of the "big shop".

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-22345958

" I also run a car, pay all of my other bills and go out at least twice a week with the money left over. The last week of the month is "porridge week". It's 99p for 500g of porridge and I eat it for breakfast, lunch and tea in the seven days before I get paid again."

I have porridge every morning, unsweetened about two thirds water/one third milk and usually a couple of slices of toast , bread from the freezer of course that was bought on its sell buy for 20p as any self respecting housepricecrasher does. The monthly shop came in at £28.88 (two of us) last week for just under 100 items.

Edited by crashmonitor

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Overall a good balanced article I think but some of that stuff makes me laugh. Living in London and owning a car? What planet is she on?

James in Turkey put his finger on the problem: Living on a low income is only a problem when you choose to live in an environment which requires you to have large amounts of money. People choose to live a life in which they live in a house, drive a car, and go to the pub, then they complain that they don't have enough money to survive.

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I have porridge every morning, unsweetened about two thirds water/one third milk and usually a couple of slices of toast , bread from the freezer of course that was bought on its sell buy for 20p as any self respecting housepricecrasher does. The monthly shop came in at £28.88 (two of us) last week for just under 100 items.

I am a believer in deflation, but struggle to believe you could do that. Do you mean £128?

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But doesn't everybody do something like this, only probably to a less dramatic extent? For probably bizarre psychological reasons we always make big purchases early in the month and then tail off our spending later on. And periodically tea is what I call "chuck and cook" whereby all the odd bits of meat and vegetables in the fridge are made into pasta or risotto or something in anticipation of the "big shop".

Strangely, NO, I have always done exactly the opposite.

If I want something I will see if I have enough left over at the end of the month, and if necessary economise beforehand.

Applies to everything.

I would never banquet the day after payday,

I might 'banquet' the day before payday, but only then if I had saved, could afford it, and really needed to.

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In January I moved to London from Darlington. Since then I have lived on £1,242 a month after tax. Half of this goes on rent"

WTF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And therein lies the problem. The rentiers absorb the disposable income.

Apologies for the Eric Pebble font sizes

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WTF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And therein lies the problem. The rentiers absorb the disposable income.

Apologies for the Eric Pebble font sizes

£600 p.m for rent is not bad, especially in London? The monthly "income" is benefits I presume?

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£600 p.m for rent is not bad, especially in London? The monthly "income" is benefits I presume?

Is Darlington in London? Thought it was in the NE blink.gif

For London rent £600 isn't so bad, but Darlington?

Seems to me that moving benefit people out from London has kept the BTL bubble pumped in the regions, which was probably the real purpose of it.

Edited by Secure Tenant

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I am a believer in deflation, but struggle to believe you could do that. Do you mean £128?

Its not the only spend in the month on groceries. We do one big shop each month when we know the reductions will be on and fill a big trolley to the brim for under thirty quid usually and have small shops in between for bits. The reductions tend to be vegetables (that do surprisingly well in the fridge weeks after the sell buy, bread (which is freezable) and fruit.

If we can get away with buying groceries low we will. We don't eat much meat which helps.

But we do eat out about twice a week and I do have at least a bottle of red wine each week to myself which I buy separately. Spending on these would dwarf the grocery shop.

Edited by crashmonitor

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Its not the only spend in the month on groceries. We do one big shop each month when we know the reductions will be on and fill a big trolley to the brim for under thrity quid usually and have small shops in between for bits. The reductions tend to be vegetables (that do surprisingly well in the fridge weeks after the sell buy, bread (which is freezable) and fruit.

I do pretty similar, but cook up the concoctions of veg and meat in the slow cooker. Also Sainsburys basic mince at £1.26 a pack is a staple, as are eggs.

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Guest eight

WTF!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

And therein lies the problem. The rentiers absorb the disposable income.

Apologies for the Eric Pebble font sizes

Well worth it to get away from Darlington though.

Cheap at twice the price.

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But doesn't everybody do something like this, only probably to a less dramatic extent? For probably bizarre psychological reasons we always make big purchases early in the month and then tail off our spending later on. And periodically tea is what I call "chuck and cook" whereby all the odd bits of meat and vegetables in the fridge are made into pasta or risotto or something in anticipation of the "big shop".

I don't think I've ever done something like that.

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I don't think I've ever done something like that.

Me neither. Maybe when I first started work and got my first 'real' pay packets. Other than that I'm not sure what kind of cognitive dissonance you have to have going on to think spending money right after pay day will somehow make the rest of the month easier to manage.

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Guest eight

Me neither. Maybe when I first started work and got my first 'real' pay packets. Other than that I'm not sure what kind of cognitive dissonance you have to have going on to think spending money right after pay day will somehow make the rest of the month easier to manage.

I didn't mean blow all your cash in one go then live like a hermit for three weeks!

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Is Darlington in London? Thought it was in the NE blink.gif

For London rent £600 isn't so bad, but Darlington?

Seems to me that moving benefit people out from London has kept the BTL bubble pumped in the regions, which was probably the real purpose of it.

The quote says moved from Darlington to London, living on 1200 a month? The monthly income and rent seems too low for London?

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I didn't mean blow all your cash in one go then live like a hermit for three weeks!

I know what you mean and tend to agree with you. I'll even resort to some end month penny-pinching tactics if I've had some unforeseen costs in the costs even if there's money I could spend just because I like to keep my spending around a controlled level.

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Its not the only spend in the month on groceries. We do one big shop each month when we know the reductions will be on and fill a big trolley to the brim for under thirty quid usually and have small shops in between for bits. The reductions tend to be vegetables (that do surprisingly well in the fridge weeks after the sell buy, bread (which is freezable) and fruit.

If we can get away with buying groceries low we will. We don't eat much meat which helps.

But we do eat out about twice a week and I do have at least a bottle of red wine each week to myself which I buy separately. Spending on these would dwarf the grocery shop.

So about £200 p.m all in? For me there is a point at which it is not worth scrimping and saving, fruit and veg for example, I just buy organic because it seems better quality. Getting lowest possible rent does help with living costs though. In the past I have found that booze and take-away, if not carefully monitored can lead to ballooning monthly costs into the hundreds of £, and with discipline these things can be cut or substituted.

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So about £200 p.m all in? For me there is a point at which it is not worth scrimping and saving, fruit and veg for example, I just buy organic because it seems better quality. Getting lowest possible rent does help with living costs though. In the past I have found that booze and take-away, if not carefully monitored can lead to ballooning monthly costs into the hundreds of £, and with discipline these things can be cut or substituted.

The good news is that making your own booze is easy and dirt cheap!

I agree though a cult of takeaways seems to have boomed over the last 20 years or so. People in Britain rarely bought takeaway food unless it was fish and chips and that was usually not much more expensive than buying the raw materials and cooking it yourself.

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£600 p.m for rent is not bad, especially in London? The monthly "income" is benefits I presume?

How about that for long term mindset psychology.

£600 a month - shoebox - not bad!!!

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Overall a good balanced article I think but some of that stuff makes me laugh. Living in London and owning a car? What planet is she on?

I never fail to be surprised by how many people insist on owning a car in London. A lot of people that come down from the North tend to have one for a few months because it was totally standard up there and then realise it is not worth it, but an amazing number keep one long term.

I live in outer London on a road that is under half a mile from the mainline station to the city centre, less than that to supermarkets and other facilities and about a 15 minute walk from a major shopping centre.

You would not believe the amount of cars parked on the road that just never move. A lot are brand new (company) cars and some are weekend-type sports cars, but quite a few are old bangers that whilst costing nothing in depreciation must be costing £1k a year to run even if they are hardly driven. It seems unbelievable that people keep them if it literally means they are eating porridge to survive rather than give up a car they don't use, or certainly don't need to use.

I can't believe that the 'Zipcar' style schemes have not taken off more in London. I have five of their cars within 0.5 mile of my house and if I hire one I can drive a brand new VW for £6 per hour with no worries about fuel or other costs. Surely a better alternative than having a 15 year old banger sitting outside your house, costing money whether or not you use it and probably not starting when you need it because it hasn't been used for so long!

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I have porridge every morning, unsweetened about two thirds water/one third milk and usually a couple of slices of toast , bread from the freezer of course that was bought on its sell buy for 20p as any self respecting housepricecrasher does. The monthly shop came in at £28.88 (two of us) last week for just under 100 items.

Best way to make porridge with water bit of salt so it sets and some sugar and milk on top.

approx 100 items costing approx 30p per item.....what do you buy? interested. ;)

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But doesn't everybody do something like this, only probably to a less dramatic extent? For probably bizarre psychological reasons we always make big purchases early in the month...

Some of us never make big purchases!

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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