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SarahBell

Ignoring Medical Advice

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Man1 had epidural for back pain (think it was a steroid injection but not sure) - told to do nothing for a couple of days and then take it easy for 3 weeks. Its worked and he's not fit as a fiddle but overdoing it like mad doing all sorts of outdoor activities.

Man2 had lump removed from stomach. Told not to do anything like drive for 3 weeks. 6 days after is also driving and doing strenuous outdoor activities.

Does no one listen to advice?

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I think there is a general lack of trust in much medical opinion.

And some people are just stupid too.

Listening to your body is generally sound advice up to a point.

I find that with boozing. My body definitely lets me know when i am overdoing it.

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Man1 had epidural for back pain (think it was a steroid injection but not sure) - told to do nothing for a couple of days and then take it easy for 3 weeks. Its worked and he's not fit as a fiddle but overdoing it like mad doing all sorts of outdoor activities.

Man2 had lump removed from stomach. Told not to do anything like drive for 3 weeks. 6 days after is also driving and doing strenuous outdoor activities.

Does no one listen to advice?

I've been visiting the physio lately, last time I could hear the conversation in the next booth between the physio and an elderly gent who it turned out had recently had a hip replacement.

Physio: So, have you been observing the notes on limiting your activity we discussed the last time you were here?

Man: Oh yes.

Physio, excellent, let's go through them to remind ourselves. So, have you been elevating your leg in a resting position for several hours a day to allow fluid to drain out?

Man: I've been sitting in my chair a lot.

Physio: Well that's not quite what we meant, it has to be elevated like we discussed- sit in bed with a pillow or two under it.

Man: Oh.

Physio: Have you been avoiding twisting your leg to prevent straining the new joint while it heals?

Man: Oh yes, but I have started tying my own laces again and find it tricky to reach(gives demonstration).

Physio (aghast): You're not supposed to twist your leg like that, it strains the joint.

Man: Oh.

Physio: Have you been avoiding lifting your knee up too high?

Man: Yes, although it makes it hard to get onto my motorcycle. I can just about manage it but the kickstart (on the side of the replaced hip) is hard to use.

Physio: <hugely frustrated, discharges him after a dressing down>

--------------------------

Is there a case for keeping people like that in for an enforced convalescence rather than letting them loose on themselves?

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Is there a case for keeping people like that in for an enforced convalescence rather than letting them loose on themselves?

Possibly.I just don't want to find dead bodies. I know the first is only likely to hobble himself.

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Is there a case for keeping people like that in for an enforced convalescence rather than letting them loose on themselves?

Any such action should result in an immediate writ of Habeus Corpus.

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There is also, I suspect, an element of the medical profession covering its back. The chances are that both patients will be fine, but if (for example) the bloke who had the lump removed had been the one in a million cases who tore a muscle and died from massive internal bleeding 10 days later, and the doctor had told him that he was OK to resume extreme sports after a week, that doctor would be looking at a lawsuit, being struck off, etc. etc.

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Any such action should result in an immediate writ of Habeus Corpus.

Yes, 'enforced' is too strong a word. Maybe 'strongly recommended' is better. I get the impression the NHS are keen to get people out the door ASAP, perhaps before they ought to be, clinically. The last thing anyone wants is complications brought about by poor habits during recovery.

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There is too much advice, and people do not know enough to filter out what is rubbish and what is good. If you are taking pills for some ailment, have a look at the little sheet that comes with them. Side effects include death, rashes, madness and you shouldn't drive, drink, or do anything. That is quite a broad range of advice, which bit is relevant to you? Actually it is the manufacturer covering their backside rather than trying to be useful to the patient.

So the bloke with the lump out of his stomach....why can't he drive? The anaesthetic will be long gone, so that isn't an issue. Is it that the seatbelt will open him up in an accident? That would apply whether he is the driver or the passenger. You don't need strong stomach muscles to drive, so what is the problem? I can see why he is not allowed to go weightlifting, but that is about it. When you give someone advice that does not make sense, they will not obey it.

Ditto for the old guy with the hip. He needs to tie his shoelaces, otherwise he will trip up. Give him a way of doing it that doesn't involve stressing the joint.

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There is too much advice, and people do not know enough to filter out what is rubbish and what is good. If you are taking pills for some ailment, have a look at the little sheet that comes with them. Side effects include death, rashes, madness and you shouldn't drive, drink, or do anything. That is quite a broad range of advice, which bit is relevant to you? Actually it is the manufacturer covering their backside rather than trying to be useful to the patient.

So the bloke with the lump out of his stomach....why can't he drive? The anaesthetic will be long gone, so that isn't an issue. Is it that the seatbelt will open him up in an accident? That would apply whether he is the driver or the passenger. You don't need strong stomach muscles to drive, so what is the problem? I can see why he is not allowed to go weightlifting, but that is about it. When you give someone advice that does not make sense, they will not obey it.

Ditto for the old guy with the hip. He needs to tie his shoelaces, otherwise he will trip up. Give him a way of doing it that doesn't involve stressing the joint.

Stomach muscles do come into play with driving, hence why women who have undergone caesarean sections are banned advised not to for (six?) weeks or so- applying sufficient brake pedal pressure in an emergency situation can be impossible and stress the wound (apparently).

The old guy- I summarised, every piece of advice he was given was roundly ignored. He was(IIRC) given a means to tie his laces safely, turn while walking safely without twisting the joint etc but all to no avail.

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Stomach muscles do come into play with driving, hence why women who have undergone caesarian sections are banned advised not to for (six?) weeks or so- applying sufficient brake pedal pressure in an emergency situation can be impossible and stress the wound (apparently).

That's the theory, and if you are driving an unservoed car from the 60s, it is true. In a modern car, you hardly need any pressure to lock the wheels up. Strangely, you are likely to "hit the brakes" whether you are a passenger or the driver - it is instinctive.

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That's the theory, and if you are driving an unservoed car from the 60s, it is true. In a modern car, you hardly need any pressure to lock the wheels up. Strangely, you are likely to "hit the brakes" whether you are a passenger or the driver - it is instinctive.

It's ok its the guy with dodgy eyesight anyway so he's not likely to see anything coming to need to brake.

He needed the car cos he couldn't push the rotavator to the site... :)

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That's the theory, and if you are driving an unservoed car from the 60s, it is true. In a modern car, you hardly need any pressure to lock the wheels up. Strangely, you are likely to "hit the brakes" whether you are a passenger or the driver - it is instinctive.

Not true, in my experience. Pedal requires significant pressure to lock wheels. My model of is car is noted for having decent brakes, as far as road cars of the time go. Thankfully I've never had to step on it, but I've never locked up in the dry, and that's with what felt like some pretty strong braking force and applied pedal pressure on a few occasions.

I'd be horrified if a friend or loved one were to inadvertently step in front of a car which required an emergency stop if the driver were someone I was aware had very recently undergone abdominal surgery and had no doctor's certificate to confirm they were fit to drive again.

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Have to say that I'd be probably ignore any advice that didn't seem to be anything more than ridiculously over-cautious. There's too much crying wolf these days.

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Various dentists in different countries have been telling me a tooth of mine needs to be taken out, for the last 28 years in fact, my guess is that one day they'll be right.

For the last 3 years I should have been taking blood pressure meds, but I knew the long term prognosis of starting down that road so have taken my own measures (5:2 fasting diet and beetroot juice) and now don't need them.

Medical advice is often poor, not necessarily because a doctor or dentist is bad at their job, they are forced to give advice which has the best chance of success for the majority of people, they simply don't have enough specific knowledge of each individual they see.

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My model of is car is noted for having decent brakes, as far as road cars of the time go.

So how old? My 2001 car stops on a sixpence with minimal force. I get out of an older car and generally the first few stops are violent as I get used to the pedal pressure needed. I remember what I was capable of when I had my appendix done - and I could exert a hell of a lot more force than my 82 year old mother can - and she has no problem driving at all, legal or otherwise. Well, she is sodding terrifying to drive with, but the brakes aren't the problem....

It is about scale and common sense. Would I drive a Land Rover 400 miles, a week after having my appendix done? No. Would I drive a Micra to the shops? Yes.

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Here's yet another reason to listen to your body and not to (previous) medical advice.

Granted, I'm not a freckly white-skinned redhead, for them the previous advice is perhaps still valid.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-22433359

Nope even makes sense for us with fair skin. Its just common sense. Don't stay in it too long to get you burnt.

This could maybe be added to that huge vit D thread - wherever it is.

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  • 238 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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