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thecrashingisles

Relief For Shoppers As Prices Start To Fall

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2320402/Relief-shoppers-prices-start-fall-clothes-shoes-products-cheaper-year-ago.html

Clothes, shoes and many other products are cheaper than a year ago – and there is even hope of an end to spiralling food prices.

Figures today from high street retailers offer some relief to struggling families who have endured the longest cost of living squeeze in a century.

The average amount charged for all goods other than food – items such as furniture and electrical products – was down by 1 per cent in April compared to a year ago.

Fashion chains have cut the price of clothes and shoes by an average of 4.7 per cent in a desperate attempt to boost sales of spring ranges that suffered because of the cold weather.

The annual rate of food price increases is put at 2.9 per cent, which is higher than the typical rise in pay and pensions but is the lowest level since November 2009.

As a result, the net change to all shop prices is put at an increase of just 0.4 per cent for April compared to a year ago, according to the figures published by the British Retail Consortium (BRC).

The figures reflect the fact that stores have been forced to cap prices and launch a raft of special sale days in order to tempt people through the doors.

But while shop price rises appear to have been tamed, householders are still struggling to cope with the impact of big increases in gas and electricity bills.

BRC director general Helen Dickinson said: ‘Household finances are still under pressure but it’s clear that isn’t coming from the shops.

It's good to see a positive spin on deflation for once.

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The thing is if there is nothing that has been deflated you want to buy you can't benefit from it......stuff you have to buy deflating, then you are talking business. ;)

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Of course the fact food is still going up is the important one. Unless you've worked out how to avoid eating.

Food is incredibly cheap at the checkout*.

The real price of food is paid through your taxes.

* I also don't understand why people moan so much about the price of household food, it's as if paying for food takes away from the real enjoyments in life, such as a designer label.

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The thing is if there is nothing that has been deflated you want to buy you can't benefit from it......stuff you have to buy deflating, then you are talking business. ;)

Everything I am buying for my work is deflating significantly if I pay cash and has been for about 6 months. I am seeing nice discounts for cash on personal purchases too, both goods and services.

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Everything I am buying for my work is deflating significantly if I pay cash and has been for about 6 months. I am seeing nice discounts for cash on personal purchases too, both goods and services.

...falling price of services does make a big difference.....but what about growth? ;)

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...falling price of services does make a big difference.....but what about growth? ;)

Ironically, I am being much more productive as the cost of items that 'releases' my productivity has fallen.

So I think there will be growth, one day

and then it might be distributed differently, or more evenly perhaps

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Ironically, I am being much more productive as the cost of items that 'releases' my productivity has fallen.

So I think there will be growth, one day

and then it might be distributed differently, or more evenly perhaps

Price of kleenex coming down then?

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Price of kleenex coming down then?

Yes, funnily enough, one of my smaller costs.

But I've also made purchases of ~60k for 3 items that last year I was quoted ~ £120k.

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Are these clothes, shoes etc the same quality though? Are they exactly the same product or have they been made smaller or with cheaper ingredients etc etc.

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Are these clothes, shoes etc the same quality though? Are they exactly the same product or have they been made smaller or with cheaper ingredients etc etc.

...I think it is more rise the prices to then reduce them.....the bargain you never had but thought you did. ;)

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Are these clothes, shoes etc the same quality though? Are they exactly the same product or have they been made smaller or with cheaper ingredients etc etc.

I particularly admire the technique employed by Greggs: keep the weight of the pastries about the same but lower the protein content!

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/money/bills/article-2319424/Products-getting-smaller-price-pay-stays-same.html

article-2319424-199DBCB0000005DC-582_634x433.jpg

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Of course the fact food is still going up is the important one. Unless you've worked out how to avoid eating.

We've just worked out how not to pay the price with recourse to a freezer and the reductions counter. I think we hit 100 items for £28 for our once monthly mega main shop. Things like warburtons bread (7 loaves at 36p) vegetables down to 25p from £2 etc. etc.

Edited by crashmonitor

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Ironically, I am being much more productive as the cost of items that 'releases' my productivity has fallen.

Its not ironic at all, its how capitalism is supposed to work - lower costs increases productivity, which lowers costs further, which further increases productivity, which .... etc etc. Unfortunately a long time ago TPTB invented this thing called "inflation" which legitimizes money creation by a select few allowing them to steal the fruits of the increased productivity for themselves.

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Its not ironic at all, its how capitalism is supposed to work - lower costs increases productivity, which lowers costs further, which further increases productivity, which .... etc etc. Unfortunately a long time ago TPTB invented this thing called "inflation" which legitimizes money creation by a select few allowing them to steal the fruits of the increased productivity for themselves.

Yes,

those that commanded inflated prices are finding they can no longer do so - they will become leaner - and, once the phoney money has gone, real money may circulate and productivity may increase. Who'd a thunk it ?

If it's allowed to happen

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Yes,

those that commanded inflated prices are finding they can no longer do so - they will become leaner - and, once the phoney money has gone, real money may circulate and productivity may increase. Who'd a thunk it ?

If it's allowed to happen

People that pay high rents, have high debt and pay high taxes have to charge more......therefore those with low outgoings and debt can undercut them. ;)

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Yes,

those that commanded inflated prices are finding they can no longer do so - they will become leaner - and, once the phoney money has gone, real money may circulate and productivity may increase. Who'd a thunk it ?

If it's allowed to happen

The problem is that there is no such thing as 'phoney money vs real money'. It's all fungible - a pound created by the BoE magicking it onto their balance sheet when they buy Gilts is the same as a pound that someone earns for working their nuts off.

What's happening is that all the newly created pounds are going to the people at the top, whereas everyone else is finding themselves comparatively worse off as the price of the essentials of life go up. Hence the squeeze that people are feeling and the general lack of disposable income amongst the proles to spend on discretionary items - nothing to do with austerity, everything to do with economic repression.

Don't hold your breath waiting for the printing and cheap central bank liquidity to stop. The economy is now hooked into the intravenous drip of cheap money and will go into spasms at any hint of withdrawal of the drug.

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I particularly admire the technique employed by Greggs: keep the weight of the pastries about the same but lower the protein content!

http://www.dailymail...stays-same.html

article-2319424-199DBCB0000005DC-582_634x433.jpg

I wouldn't call any of those products 'food'.

Just branded sludge made in a factory.

Stop eating cr4p.

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The problem is that there is no such thing as 'phoney money vs real money'. It's all fungible - a pound created by the BoE magicking it onto their balance sheet when they buy Gilts is the same as a pound that someone earns for working their nuts off.

What's happening is that all the newly created pounds are going to the people at the top, whereas everyone else is finding themselves comparatively worse off as the price of the essentials of life go up. Hence the squeeze that people are feeling and the general lack of disposable income amongst the proles to spend on discretionary items - nothing to do with austerity, everything to do with economic repression.

Don't hold your breath waiting for the printing and cheap central bank liquidity to stop. The economy is now hooked into the intravenous drip of cheap money and will go into spasms at any hint of withdrawal of the drug.

I was thinking more of the 'old' inflationary money created by the banks, before the BoE came to the rescue so helpfully.

But I agree with your point and prediction.

Although i would argue that the spasms we're witnessing are akin to those seen when pouring salt onto a dead fish.

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I wouldn't call any of those products 'food'.

Just branded sludge made in a factory.

Stop eating cr4p.

Prices for 'real' food are rising at a shocking rate. Have you visited a Butcher recently?

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The problem is that there is no such thing as 'phoney money vs real money'. It's all fungible - a pound created by the BoE magicking it onto their balance sheet when they buy Gilts is the same as a pound that someone earns for working their nuts off.

What's happening is that all the newly created pounds are going to the people at the top, whereas everyone else is finding themselves comparatively worse off as the price of the essentials of life go up. Hence the squeeze that people are feeling and the general lack of disposable income amongst the proles to spend on discretionary items - nothing to do with austerity, everything to do with economic repression.

Don't hold your breath waiting for the printing and cheap central bank liquidity to stop. The economy is now hooked into the intravenous drip of cheap money and will go into spasms at any hint of withdrawal of the drug.

I'm inclined to disagree.

I think that money has been ending up at the top for a long time.

It has only been new debt money entering at the bottom that has kept things going.

QE+deficit spending has been employed since new debt money entering the bottom has stopped.

QE+deficit spending goes on benefits teachers wages ect but eventual gets hoarded at the top.

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Falling prices as demand is being destroyed. How are margins holding? Interesting that bank profits arr improving as loan provisions shrink. Heard an article on radio that diy spending is tanking.

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  • 245 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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