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Petrol Sales Slump To 23-Year Low

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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2316288/Petrol-sales-slump-23-year-low-drivers-suffer-sky-high-prices-forecourts.html

Petrol sales have fallen to their lowest level since records began, due to soaring prices.

Consumption at forecourts across the country fell to a new low of 1.37billion litres last month, according to the AA.

This represents a drop of 56million litres since February and marks the lowest level of consumption since January 1990.

As cars get more economical this decline would appear permanent.

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Most people I know who’ve bought a car recently bought diesels…

I've been using a scooter for the last 9 months. You can get 120 mpg plus out of 125cc . . .

The UK climate isn't wonderful for two wheels, but you'll save the cost easily just using one as shopping transport. (No congestion charges, often no parking charges, £16 a year road tax.)

In warmer climes, there's a big move to two wheels: more sold in Italy than cars last year.

Loading taxes onto motorists had to be self-defeating in the end.

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Most people I know who’ve bought a car recently bought diesels…

I suspect that is the truth! I'm still doing my bit to waste the Earth's resources though! ;)

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Petrol sales have fallen to their lowest level since records began, due to soaring prices. taxes

The data from the US, which is similar, seems to suggest it's mostly due to demographic changes and changes in youth preferences.

There's no actual data or evidence in the Daily Hate article so they're little help.

It's hard to believe it's down to fuel efficiency if one looks at the volume of massively overweight 4x4s on the roads ferrying a 5'2" woman to the nail boutique.

20 years ago you could get fiat's with 500cc engines for instance.

Something else is going on.................

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Where are these soaring prices?

18Apr11 130.9p

22Apr13 130.9p

From my weekly petrolprices.com emails

Perhaps it's something other that petrol which is too expensive.

This

I know a lot of people in the motor trade (repair/service) most seem to be of the opinion that the two car family is all but a luxury

But to confirm the above ,It would be interesting to see how many cars are on the road now compared to 5 years ago

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The article is right about petrol surplus in Europe, to say we are swimming in it is an understatement.

Changing fuel duty from volumetric to energy basis for petrol and diesel europe would see a bit of a swing back to petrol in market share (petrol is "taxed" much higher on an energy basis.) This would also allow the refinereis to operate more efficiently overall.

More fuel efficient petrol engines are having a big impact (successive rule changes have been pushing in this direction for nearly 20 years now)

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The data from the US, which is similar, seems to suggest it's mostly due to demographic changes and changes in youth preferences.

There's no actual data or evidence in the Daily Hate article so they're little help.

It's hard to believe it's down to fuel efficiency if one looks at the volume of massively overweight 4x4s on the roads ferrying a 5'2" woman to the nail boutique.

20 years ago you could get fiat's with 500cc engines for instance.

Something else is going on.................

The massive 4x4 uses diesel unlike the fiat 500 equivalent using petrol.

There has been a continuing shift from petrol to diesel in terms of market share.

The article is talking about petrol (not total fuel or diesel) usage falling - it has been since the mid 1990s however diesel usage (in litres, but diesel has~11.5% more energy per litre than petrol) has been rising for decades. Total road fuel volume peaked in November 2007, with petrol falling but diesel still rising slowly.

(search for "HMRC hydrocarbon oil bulletin" for monthly and time series data spreadsheet)

Edited by koala_bear

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Approximately half of all new car sales are diesels these days, nudged slightly over that in 2011 (can't find 2012 figs but reasonable to expect the trend to continue) from a very low base, in 2004 the fraction was around 27%, and even then the uptrend was well established.

article-0-0F5B1C9500000578-781_468x286.jpg

Old top gear from 1991 talking about diesel as a niche market, probably no more than a few % of sales back then (strange seeing a Top Gear report that actually contains useful information):

It's reasonable to expect petrol sales to continue to decline since cars from 2004 and earlier will be scrapped and many replaced with diesels over the next few years.

Much is made of increasing efficiency, but I don't buy that to the extent is is pumped in the press. People might be buying replacing bigger engines with smaller ones for a definite gain, but I think a buyer of a similar engined replacement won't see a great deal of change in consumption.

Edited by cheeznbreed

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In that top gear video above they say 70,000 miles pa to break even with petrol, nowadays I would say its still around half that, especially when you factor in that diesels today are so much more complex and fragile, iirc your meant to drive a modern diesel hard at least once a week for the regen I went to a scrapyard last month and was surprised at the amount of reasonably modern dielsels that were being broken for parts.

its 38p a litre in 91.

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Approximately half of all new car sales are diesels these days, nudged slightly over that in 2011 (can't find 2012 figs but reasonable to expect the trend to continue) from a very low base, in 2004 the fraction was around 27%, and even then the uptrend was well established.

article-0-0F5B1C9500000578-781_468x286.jpg

Old top gear from 1991 talking about diesel as a niche market, probably no more than a few % of sales back then (strange seeing a Top Gear report that actually contains useful information):

..//..

Did I see 48p per litre there!?!? :unsure:

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Something else is going on.................

Article does mention drop in sales from forecourts. Maybe there's been a drop in the number of forecourts ;)

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I've had a license for 7 years+, never drove since passing my test due to prohibitive insurance costs. The private taxes I must legally pay to the insurance cartels of London so that I can legally drive without harassment, fines, bans and the threat of imprisonment from the state have priced me out of driving in the first place. Thus I am in position, nor do I have any desire to pay taxes to the state for petrol.

If the state didn't enforce me to pay private taxes for insurance, then I'd drive and pay taxes to the state by buying petrol.

I can occasionally be seen pushing my wheelbarrow around town nowadays.

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I've had a license for 7 years+, never drove since passing my test due to prohibitive insurance costs. The private taxes I must legally pay to the insurance cartels of London so that I can legally drive without harassment, fines, bans and the threat of imprisonment from the state have priced me out of driving in the first place. Thus I am in position, nor do I have any desire to pay taxes to the state for petrol.

If the state didn't enforce me to pay private taxes for insurance, then I'd drive and pay taxes to the state by buying petrol.

I can occasionally be seen pushing my wheelbarrow around town nowadays.

...as seen on 'TOP soil GEAR' ;)

http://metro.co.uk/2011/05/26/teen-chris-berry-resorts-to-driving-old-tractor-after-17k-car-insurance-quote-23829/

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The massive 4x4 uses diesel unlike the fiat 500 equivalent using petrol.

There has been a continuing shift from petrol to diesel in terms of market share.

The article is talking about petrol (not total fuel or diesel) usage falling - it has been since the mid 1990s however diesel usage (in litres, but diesel has~11.5% more energy per litre than petrol) has been rising for decades. Total road fuel volume peaked in November 2007, with petrol falling but diesel still rising slowly.

(search for "HMRC hydrocarbon oil bulletin" for monthly and time series data spreadsheet)

Thanks.

'Miles driven' would be a better measure then, or miles driven per capita.

US shows that has been falling since 2005. I'd be surprised if UK was different.

Diesel v petrol seems to (mostly) be a red herring. The real life mpg's are roughly 20% lower than manufacturer's claim in any event.

US per capita gasoline sales peaked in 1989

http://advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/Gasoline-Sales.php

US Vehicle miles driven (and per capita) peaked in 2005.

http://advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/DOT-Miles-Driven.php

Interestingly the US has low taxation on petrol/diesel compared to UK's high taxes, so you'd expect US sales to be more price sensitive. Culturally obviously they're different to UK in terms of car/public transport use and practicality due to suburbanisation and sheer distances compared to our (fortunately) tiny, compact land.

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Interestingly the US has low taxation on petrol/diesel compared to UK's high taxes, so you'd expect US sales to be more price sensitive. Culturally obviously they're different to UK in terms of car/public transport use and practicality due to suburbanisation and sheer distances compared to our (fortunately) tiny, compact land.

Can't remember where now, but I recall reading that the average mileage per year done by an American driver is about the same as that of a British one - about 11-12k miles a year.

As a general rule, Americans don't use their cars for journeys of more than 200-300 miles or so: for those trips they fly.

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Thanks.

'Miles driven' would be a better measure then, or miles driven per capita.

US shows that has been falling since 2005. I'd be surprised if UK was different.

Diesel v petrol seems to (mostly) be a red herring. The real life mpg's are roughly 20% lower than manufacturer's claim in any event.

US per capita gasoline sales peaked in 1989

http://advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/Gasoline-Sales.php

US Vehicle miles driven (and per capita) peaked in 2005.

http://advisorperspectives.com/dshort/updates/DOT-Miles-Driven.php

Interestingly the US has low taxation on petrol/diesel compared to UK's high taxes, so you'd expect US sales to be more price sensitive. Culturally obviously they're different to UK in terms of car/public transport use and practicality due to suburbanisation and sheer distances compared to our (fortunately) tiny, compact land.

real life mpg's/wild claims would be the same 1990's or 2010's though. although the figures can be over 60mpg on a long run for modern big diesel cars weighing 1.5 ton or so (if driven smoothly and at or below motorway limits) I'd doubt if many old 2.0L petrol vauxhall cavaliers would of averaged more than half that.

edited to add: I'd wonder what an old 1 ton car would average mpg if a 2010's super economical turbo diesel engine was professionally put into it.

Edited by motch

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Can't remember where now, but I recall reading that the average mileage per year done by an American driver is about the same as that of a British one - about 11-12k miles a year.

As a general rule, Americans don't use their cars for journeys of more than 200-300 miles or so: for those trips they fly.

Yes, it's a common myth that average driving distances in the UK and US are vastly different.

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could there be a unofficial business there ?

It's all cash in hand, got to supplement your pension/pension credit.

People over 35 on the dole can generally afford to run a car. Working people under 30 struggle to run a car and pay bus/train fairs.

It's due to variations in the cost of insurance.

And car insurance in the UK is a dirty joke. A family member of mine yielded in compensation to her sons after death (from the insurance companies), what I am quoted for a couple of years driving.

Yet when somebody is injured it's the NHS and welfare state that picks up the pieces.

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  • 276 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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