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How To Eat Healthily On £1 A Day Challenge

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The costed recipes in the BBC article are contrived, particularly if a single person tried to do it.

For example:

1/4 red/yellow pepper. (6p worth) £1.51 for 6 Sainsburys.

A fresh pepper will not last for more than about 4 days even in a fridge. So if you used 4 1/4ths over 4 days, you would be throwing out 5 unused mushy peppers. So costed properly, those peppers would cost 38p a day, including the wasted ones.

Remember that the Government is telling people they can live cheaply on benefits, and also criticising people for wasting food and throwing it away. The BBC figures understate how much food costs foor single people.

Of course, one can buy single peppers, but you do not then enjoy quantity discounts, so it is still more expensive/

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The costed recipes in the BBC article are contrived, particularly if a single person tried to do it.

For example:

1/4 red/yellow pepper. (6p worth) £1.51 for 6 Sainsburys.

A fresh pepper will not last for more than about 4 days even in a fridge. So if you used 4 1/4ths over 4 days, you would be throwing out 5 unused mushy peppers. So costed properly, those peppers would cost 38p a day, including the wasted ones.

Remember that the Government is telling people they can live cheaply on benefits, and also criticising people for wasting food and throwing it away. The BBC figures understate how much food costs foor single people.

Of course, one can buy single peppers, but you do not then enjoy quantity discounts, so it is still more expensive/

http://www.mysupermarket.co.uk/Shopping/FindProducts.aspx?Query=pepper

80p for single pepper. The rest is ******** too.

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How utterly uncomprehending of the situation of some one fifth of the worlds population is this crass and simplistic article from the official mouthpiece of the UK.

It must be very hard indeed, for those whose very existence depends on being able to fund a healthy gastronomic lifestyle on no more than a pound a day, not to lose sight of the fact that eating should be a pleasure and not just a necessity, I dont think. I am sure that the poverty stricken of the world will welcome this article as insightful and sympathetic, as they put the the meagre minimun of calories into their bodies, and wonder if their children will survive. They will no doubt find eating a pleasure, but not in the same way that mindless BBC reporters do, as they slurp on their non life sustaining haut cuisine.

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The costed recipes in the BBC article are contrived, particularly if a single person tried to do it.

For example:

1/4 red/yellow pepper. (6p worth) £1.51 for 6 Sainsburys.

A fresh pepper will not last for more than about 4 days even in a fridge. So if you used 4 1/4ths over 4 days, you would be throwing out 5 unused mushy peppers. So costed properly, those peppers would cost 38p a day, including the wasted ones.

Remember that the Government is telling people they can live cheaply on benefits, and also criticising people for wasting food and throwing it away. The BBC figures understate how much food costs foor single people.

Of course, one can buy single peppers, but you do not then enjoy quantity discounts, so it is still more expensive/

Tosh. I buy them commonly in packs of two or three, and they last plenty of time for me to eat them.

In my two years of eating on much less than £1/day, peppers were a rare luxury.

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Remember that the Government is telling people they can live cheaply on benefits, and also criticising people for wasting food and throwing it away. The BBC figures understate how much food costs for single people.

+1

This is from the sponsor's website:

https://www.livebelowtheline.com/uk-en-thecause

By living off just £1 per day for food for 5 days, you will be bringing to life the direct experiences of the 1.4 billion people currently living in extreme poverty and helping to make real change.

Utter rubbish. The cost of food in most developing countries is far lower than here in the UK so it is not a good comparison. It would be better to do it as a percentage of income. Also, as we import our food from these poorer countries won't we be hurting their economies in the process? Agriculture makes up around 60% on the Indian economy and 70% of China's.

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yeah, lets all do it.

crash supermarkets, crash the GDP and crash the prices of everything above £1.

It would work too as demand plummetted from £80 per week to £7 per week.

corse, that would leve another £73 per week to add to your mortgage.....hussah!

Edited by Bloo Loo

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The costed recipes in the BBC article are contrived, particularly if a single person tried to do it.

For example:

1/4 red/yellow pepper. (6p worth) £1.51 for 6 Sainsburys.

A fresh pepper will not last for more than about 4 days even in a fridge. So if you used 4 1/4ths over 4 days, you would be throwing out 5 unused mushy peppers. So costed properly, those peppers would cost 38p a day, including the wasted ones.

Remember that the Government is telling people they can live cheaply on benefits, and also criticising people for wasting food and throwing it away. The BBC figures understate how much food costs foor single people.

Of course, one can buy single peppers, but you do not then enjoy quantity discounts, so it is still more expensive/

I buy peppers in bulk when they are cheap, slice into strips and put them in the freezer. I add them to sauces, curries and so on as required.

You can do the same with many vegetables, and its OK with mushrooms too.

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I buy peppers in bulk when they are cheap, slice into strips and put them in the freezer. I add them to sauces, curries and so on as required.

You can do the same with many vegetables, and its OK with mushrooms too.

That's always supposing one has a freezer and can afford the lecky to run it.

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This time next year it will called onepoundfiftymeals.blog.com ;)

No, they'll do the pound shop trick, the portion sizes and quality will just gradually decline until the £1 meal is a spoonful of dried yellow split peas soaked in a muddy puddle on the road.

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The supermarkets are the problem. The cost of food has no relation to the prices they charge.

For example, farmgate price for wheat is 10-20p per kg. 'Value' flour at Tesco's is 80p/kg, next to it they sell dumpling mixture (with 1p worth of added fat). £7.60p per kg.

Potatoes, average price for farmers 15p/kg (on a bad year 2p/kg..) Tescos' sell for £1 or £2 per kg. And it goes on

Imagine if Mercedes or Airbus could sell a lump of metal for 10 or 100 times it cost by putting it in a plastic bag with their name on it, instead of the 10-20% profit they get through decades of development and investment.

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Tosh. I buy them commonly in packs of two or three, and they last plenty of time for me to eat them.

In my two years of eating on much less than £1/day, peppers were a rare luxury.

Indeed. They are not a regular purchase here either as they're pricey. Occaisionally aldi have some on their 6 veg deal and thats worth getting them.

You can buy frozen peppers though. And tons of other veg frozen. That probably makes more sense than buying fresh and wasting it.

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Indeed. They are not a regular purchase here either as they're pricey. Occaisionally aldi have some on their 6 veg deal and thats worth getting them.

You can buy frozen peppers though. And tons of other veg frozen. That probably makes more sense than buying fresh and wasting it.

Imported peppers were a luxury, hardly anyone ate them let alone could buy them whenever they wanted at any price years ago......there will always be an alternative. ;)

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Tosh. I buy them commonly in packs of two or three, and they last plenty of time for me to eat them.

In my two years of eating on much less than £1/day, peppers were a rare luxury.

Hmmm. Well, when they are cut, they start to go soft almost immediately. I don't keep them for more than a few days anyway.

If you are going to be rude, I shall add pork to my recipes. ;)

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The supermarkets are the problem. The cost of food has no relation to the prices they charge.

For example, farmgate price for wheat is 10-20p per kg. 'Value' flour at Tesco's is 80p/kg, next to it they sell dumpling mixture (with 1p worth of added fat). £7.60p per kg.

Potatoes, average price for farmers 15p/kg (on a bad year 2p/kg..) Tescos' sell for £1 or £2 per kg. And it goes on

Imagine if Mercedes or Airbus could sell a lump of metal for 10 or 100 times it cost by putting it in a plastic bag with their name on it, instead of the 10-20% profit they get through decades of development and investment.

Tescos profit margin is currently 2.18%. And they (along with other UK supermarkets) are as efficient as anyone in the world. It's an extremely competitive sector, and you don't appreciate quite how great they are until you've lived somewhere without them.

They of course have to meet lots of costs, from land, distribution and energy through to staff and training. And lots of tax on top of that. Not those juicy subsidies and relaxed (or blind-eye-turned) food safety/hygiene standards you accept from your farm shop.

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Hmmm. Well, when they are cut, they start to go soft almost immediately. I don't keep them for more than a few days anyway.

Oh, right. Well, I'll sometimes eat a whole one (e.g. as chief ingredient in a stirfry), or else two halves on nearby days. Whole peppers last quite a while.

If you are going to be rude, I shall add pork to my recipes. ;)

:ph34r: :angry: :unsure::wacko:

OK, time to figure out a recipe for roast tenant.

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What about growing your own and using save seeds etc, live for nothing

Growing your own does not cost nothing......sometimes it is cheaper to buy certain foods.......all be it less so now than before....costs include: Land, water, soil, tools the cost of insects/pests, weather and disease and of course the time cost. ;)

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A fresh pepper will not last for more than about 4 days even in a fridge. So if you used 4 1/4ths over 4 days, you would be throwing out 5 unused mushy peppers. So costed properly, those peppers would cost 38p a day, including the wasted ones.

Not add them into a stew/mince/curry/chile in the slow cooker and freeze the surplus or at least in the fridge (implies you have a freezer and a fridge and a slow cooker for that matter).

Bulk food cooking is part of the key to the process of saving money. Most people only think one meal ahead. Thinking a week ahead is essential IMO.

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  • 244 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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